Limits...
Management of cutaneous disorders related to inflammatory bowel disease.

Pellicer Z, Santiago JM, Rodriguez A, Alonso V, Antón R, Bosca MM - Ann Gastroenterol (2012)

Bottom Line: Almost one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develop skin lesions.Cutaneous disorders associated with IBD may be divided into 5 groups based on the nature of the association: specific manifestations (orofacial and metastatic IBD), reactive disorders (erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyodermatitis-pyostomatitis vegetans, Sweet's syndrome and cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), miscellaneous (epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid, linear IgA bullous disease, squamous cell carcinoma-Bowen's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, secondary amyloidosis and psoriasis), manifestations secondary to malnutrition and malabsorption (zinc, vitamins and iron deficiency), and manifestations secondary to drug therapy (salicylates, immunosupressors, biological agents, antibiotics and steroids).The aim of this review includes the description of clinical manifestations, course, work-up and, most importantly, management of these disorders, providing an assessment of the literature on the topic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dermatology Department of the University Clinic Hospital of Valencia (Zaira Pellicer, Vicent Alonso).

ABSTRACT
Almost one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develop skin lesions. Cutaneous disorders associated with IBD may be divided into 5 groups based on the nature of the association: specific manifestations (orofacial and metastatic IBD), reactive disorders (erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyodermatitis-pyostomatitis vegetans, Sweet's syndrome and cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), miscellaneous (epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid, linear IgA bullous disease, squamous cell carcinoma-Bowen's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, secondary amyloidosis and psoriasis), manifestations secondary to malnutrition and malabsorption (zinc, vitamins and iron deficiency), and manifestations secondary to drug therapy (salicylates, immunosupressors, biological agents, antibiotics and steroids). Treatment should be individualized and directed to treating the underlying IBD as well as the specific dermatologic condition. The aim of this review includes the description of clinical manifestations, course, work-up and, most importantly, management of these disorders, providing an assessment of the literature on the topic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Metastatic Crohn’s disease. Ulcerative and crusting lesion
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3959344&req=5

Figure 1: Metastatic Crohn’s disease. Ulcerative and crusting lesion

Mentions: Lesions are most frequently located in flexures, genitalia and extremities, although lesions may appear in any other area of the skin, either alone or in groups (Fig. 1) [20-22].


Management of cutaneous disorders related to inflammatory bowel disease.

Pellicer Z, Santiago JM, Rodriguez A, Alonso V, Antón R, Bosca MM - Ann Gastroenterol (2012)

Metastatic Crohn’s disease. Ulcerative and crusting lesion
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3959344&req=5

Figure 1: Metastatic Crohn’s disease. Ulcerative and crusting lesion
Mentions: Lesions are most frequently located in flexures, genitalia and extremities, although lesions may appear in any other area of the skin, either alone or in groups (Fig. 1) [20-22].

Bottom Line: Almost one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develop skin lesions.Cutaneous disorders associated with IBD may be divided into 5 groups based on the nature of the association: specific manifestations (orofacial and metastatic IBD), reactive disorders (erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyodermatitis-pyostomatitis vegetans, Sweet's syndrome and cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), miscellaneous (epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid, linear IgA bullous disease, squamous cell carcinoma-Bowen's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, secondary amyloidosis and psoriasis), manifestations secondary to malnutrition and malabsorption (zinc, vitamins and iron deficiency), and manifestations secondary to drug therapy (salicylates, immunosupressors, biological agents, antibiotics and steroids).The aim of this review includes the description of clinical manifestations, course, work-up and, most importantly, management of these disorders, providing an assessment of the literature on the topic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dermatology Department of the University Clinic Hospital of Valencia (Zaira Pellicer, Vicent Alonso).

ABSTRACT
Almost one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develop skin lesions. Cutaneous disorders associated with IBD may be divided into 5 groups based on the nature of the association: specific manifestations (orofacial and metastatic IBD), reactive disorders (erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyodermatitis-pyostomatitis vegetans, Sweet's syndrome and cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), miscellaneous (epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid, linear IgA bullous disease, squamous cell carcinoma-Bowen's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, secondary amyloidosis and psoriasis), manifestations secondary to malnutrition and malabsorption (zinc, vitamins and iron deficiency), and manifestations secondary to drug therapy (salicylates, immunosupressors, biological agents, antibiotics and steroids). Treatment should be individualized and directed to treating the underlying IBD as well as the specific dermatologic condition. The aim of this review includes the description of clinical manifestations, course, work-up and, most importantly, management of these disorders, providing an assessment of the literature on the topic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus