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Simple and sure methodology for massive hepatectomy in the mouse.

Hori T, Ohashi N, Chen F, Baine AM, Gardner LB, Jermanus S, Nguyen JH - Ann Gastroenterol (2011)

Bottom Line: The impact of various factors in the different models was also analyzed, including learning curves, operative time, survival curves and histopathological findings.According to anatomical results, murine models with 75%, 80% and 90% of liver resection produced massive hepatectomy.Learning curves and operative times were most optimal with the clip technique.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA (Tomohide Hori, Norifumi Ohashi, Feng Chen, Ann-Marie T. Baine, Lindsay B. Gardner, Sura Jermanus).

ABSTRACT

Background: Reliable models for massive hepatectomy in the mouse are required for experimental liver research.

Methods: We analyzed anatomical findings in 100 mice following massive hepatectomy induced by liver reduction >70%. The impact of various factors in the different models was also analyzed, including learning curves, operative time, survival curves and histopathological findings.

Results: According to anatomical results, murine models with 75%, 80% and 90% of liver resection produced massive hepatectomy. Learning curves and operative times were most optimal with the clip technique. Each hepatectomy performed using the clip technique produced a reasonable survival curve, and there were no differences in histopathological findings between the suture and clip techniques.

Conclusion: Massive hepatectomy by the clip technique is simple and can provide reliable and relevant data.

No MeSH data available.


Actual survival curves after massive hepatectomy. A. Actual survival curves of each hepatectomy by suture technique are shown. In each hepatectomy, twenty cases were observed. B. Actual survival curves of each hepatectomy by clip technique are shown. In each hepatectomy, twenty cases were observed. C. A total of 9.0±1.6% of the liver remains in OS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. A total of 11.5±2.1% of liver remains in the RMS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. There were no differences in survival curves after 90% hepatectomy by clip technique between the OS-remnant (n=10) and the RMS-remnant (n=10) (p = 0.3784). D. A total of 9.0±1.6% of the liver remains in OS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. A total of 11.5±2.1% of liver remains in the RMS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. There were no differences in survival curves after 90% hepatectomy by clip technique between the OS-remnant (n=10) and the RMS-remnant (n=10) (p = 0.3588).RMS, right middle segment; OS, omental segment.
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Figure 7: Actual survival curves after massive hepatectomy. A. Actual survival curves of each hepatectomy by suture technique are shown. In each hepatectomy, twenty cases were observed. B. Actual survival curves of each hepatectomy by clip technique are shown. In each hepatectomy, twenty cases were observed. C. A total of 9.0±1.6% of the liver remains in OS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. A total of 11.5±2.1% of liver remains in the RMS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. There were no differences in survival curves after 90% hepatectomy by clip technique between the OS-remnant (n=10) and the RMS-remnant (n=10) (p = 0.3784). D. A total of 9.0±1.6% of the liver remains in OS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. A total of 11.5±2.1% of liver remains in the RMS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. There were no differences in survival curves after 90% hepatectomy by clip technique between the OS-remnant (n=10) and the RMS-remnant (n=10) (p = 0.3588).RMS, right middle segment; OS, omental segment.

Mentions: In massive hepatectomy, actual survival curves of each hepatectomy are shown in Fig. 7A and 7B. Twenty cases were followed for each of the following conditions. In the 90% hepatectomy, two types of hepatectomy were available; OS-remnant 90% hepatectomy (Fig. 4C) and RMS-remnant 90% hepatectomy (Fig. 4D). Ten cases were followed in each of the 90% hepatectomy models by the suture technique, and there were no significant differences in survival curves between the OS-remnant and the RMS-remnant (p = 0.3784) (Fig. 7C). Ten cases were followed in each of the 90% hepatectomy models by the clip technique, and there were no significant differences in survival curves between the OS-remnant and the RMS-remnant (p = 0.3588) (Fig. 7D).


Simple and sure methodology for massive hepatectomy in the mouse.

Hori T, Ohashi N, Chen F, Baine AM, Gardner LB, Jermanus S, Nguyen JH - Ann Gastroenterol (2011)

Actual survival curves after massive hepatectomy. A. Actual survival curves of each hepatectomy by suture technique are shown. In each hepatectomy, twenty cases were observed. B. Actual survival curves of each hepatectomy by clip technique are shown. In each hepatectomy, twenty cases were observed. C. A total of 9.0±1.6% of the liver remains in OS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. A total of 11.5±2.1% of liver remains in the RMS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. There were no differences in survival curves after 90% hepatectomy by clip technique between the OS-remnant (n=10) and the RMS-remnant (n=10) (p = 0.3784). D. A total of 9.0±1.6% of the liver remains in OS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. A total of 11.5±2.1% of liver remains in the RMS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. There were no differences in survival curves after 90% hepatectomy by clip technique between the OS-remnant (n=10) and the RMS-remnant (n=10) (p = 0.3588).RMS, right middle segment; OS, omental segment.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 7: Actual survival curves after massive hepatectomy. A. Actual survival curves of each hepatectomy by suture technique are shown. In each hepatectomy, twenty cases were observed. B. Actual survival curves of each hepatectomy by clip technique are shown. In each hepatectomy, twenty cases were observed. C. A total of 9.0±1.6% of the liver remains in OS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. A total of 11.5±2.1% of liver remains in the RMS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. There were no differences in survival curves after 90% hepatectomy by clip technique between the OS-remnant (n=10) and the RMS-remnant (n=10) (p = 0.3784). D. A total of 9.0±1.6% of the liver remains in OS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. A total of 11.5±2.1% of liver remains in the RMS-remnant 90% hepatectomy. There were no differences in survival curves after 90% hepatectomy by clip technique between the OS-remnant (n=10) and the RMS-remnant (n=10) (p = 0.3588).RMS, right middle segment; OS, omental segment.
Mentions: In massive hepatectomy, actual survival curves of each hepatectomy are shown in Fig. 7A and 7B. Twenty cases were followed for each of the following conditions. In the 90% hepatectomy, two types of hepatectomy were available; OS-remnant 90% hepatectomy (Fig. 4C) and RMS-remnant 90% hepatectomy (Fig. 4D). Ten cases were followed in each of the 90% hepatectomy models by the suture technique, and there were no significant differences in survival curves between the OS-remnant and the RMS-remnant (p = 0.3784) (Fig. 7C). Ten cases were followed in each of the 90% hepatectomy models by the clip technique, and there were no significant differences in survival curves between the OS-remnant and the RMS-remnant (p = 0.3588) (Fig. 7D).

Bottom Line: The impact of various factors in the different models was also analyzed, including learning curves, operative time, survival curves and histopathological findings.According to anatomical results, murine models with 75%, 80% and 90% of liver resection produced massive hepatectomy.Learning curves and operative times were most optimal with the clip technique.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA (Tomohide Hori, Norifumi Ohashi, Feng Chen, Ann-Marie T. Baine, Lindsay B. Gardner, Sura Jermanus).

ABSTRACT

Background: Reliable models for massive hepatectomy in the mouse are required for experimental liver research.

Methods: We analyzed anatomical findings in 100 mice following massive hepatectomy induced by liver reduction >70%. The impact of various factors in the different models was also analyzed, including learning curves, operative time, survival curves and histopathological findings.

Results: According to anatomical results, murine models with 75%, 80% and 90% of liver resection produced massive hepatectomy. Learning curves and operative times were most optimal with the clip technique. Each hepatectomy performed using the clip technique produced a reasonable survival curve, and there were no differences in histopathological findings between the suture and clip techniques.

Conclusion: Massive hepatectomy by the clip technique is simple and can provide reliable and relevant data.

No MeSH data available.