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A schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder secondary to an arachnoid cyst remitted with neurosurgical treatment of the cyst.

Baquero GA, Molero P, Pla J, Ortuño F - Open Neuroimag J (2014)

Bottom Line: The patient was suffering his first psychotic episode and had symptoms typical of schizophrenia.In addition, the case highlights the importance of doing a structural imaging test when confronted with a first episode of psychosis, especially if the episode is relatively late in appearance.Such imaging may lead to a diagnosis that in turn can enable a definitive neurosurgical resolution of the psychosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
We describe a case of delusional psychosis that was terminated by neurosurgical removal of a large arachnoid cyst. The patient was suffering his first psychotic episode and had symptoms typical of schizophrenia. The case underscores the importance of considering that an arachnoid cyst can induce psychopathological symptoms, even those of schizophrenia. Indeed, such symptoms may be the cyst's only clinical manifestation. In addition, the case highlights the importance of doing a structural imaging test when confronted with a first episode of psychosis, especially if the episode is relatively late in appearance. Such imaging may lead to a diagnosis that in turn can enable a definitive neurosurgical resolution of the psychosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cerebral magnetic resonance image showing an arachnoid cyst in and displacing the right hemisphere.
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Figure 1: Cerebral magnetic resonance image showing an arachnoid cyst in and displacing the right hemisphere.

Mentions: After psychiatric evaluation the patient was hospitalized. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging was undertaken and revealed a large arachnoid cyst in the right hemisphere (Fig. 1). Study of the parietal calvarial region and brain stem showed relative thinning adjacent to the cyst, a finding suggestive of a congenital anomaly (Fig. 1).


A schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder secondary to an arachnoid cyst remitted with neurosurgical treatment of the cyst.

Baquero GA, Molero P, Pla J, Ortuño F - Open Neuroimag J (2014)

Cerebral magnetic resonance image showing an arachnoid cyst in and displacing the right hemisphere.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3959176&req=5

Figure 1: Cerebral magnetic resonance image showing an arachnoid cyst in and displacing the right hemisphere.
Mentions: After psychiatric evaluation the patient was hospitalized. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging was undertaken and revealed a large arachnoid cyst in the right hemisphere (Fig. 1). Study of the parietal calvarial region and brain stem showed relative thinning adjacent to the cyst, a finding suggestive of a congenital anomaly (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: The patient was suffering his first psychotic episode and had symptoms typical of schizophrenia.In addition, the case highlights the importance of doing a structural imaging test when confronted with a first episode of psychosis, especially if the episode is relatively late in appearance.Such imaging may lead to a diagnosis that in turn can enable a definitive neurosurgical resolution of the psychosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
We describe a case of delusional psychosis that was terminated by neurosurgical removal of a large arachnoid cyst. The patient was suffering his first psychotic episode and had symptoms typical of schizophrenia. The case underscores the importance of considering that an arachnoid cyst can induce psychopathological symptoms, even those of schizophrenia. Indeed, such symptoms may be the cyst's only clinical manifestation. In addition, the case highlights the importance of doing a structural imaging test when confronted with a first episode of psychosis, especially if the episode is relatively late in appearance. Such imaging may lead to a diagnosis that in turn can enable a definitive neurosurgical resolution of the psychosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus