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Dysphagia Lusoria with atrial septal defect: Simultaneous repair through midline.

Rathnakar R, Agarwal S, Datt V, Satsangi DK - Ann Pediatr Cardiol (2014)

Bottom Line: An aberrant right subclavian artery from the descending aorta is almost always reported as an isolated anomaly.We believe that median sternotomy is the optimal surgical approach for the management of these lesions.Other operative approaches are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of CTVS, GB Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
An aberrant right subclavian artery from the descending aorta is almost always reported as an isolated anomaly. We present the case of a four-year-old child with an anomalous origin of the right subclavian artery from the descending aorta, associated with an ostium secundum atrial septal defect. The patient underwent simultaneous repair of both the anomalies through median sternotomy, with implantation of the subclavian artery into the right common carotid artery. We believe that median sternotomy is the optimal surgical approach for the management of these lesions. Other operative approaches are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CECT Chest (coronal cuts) showing posterior compression of the esophagus by the aberrant right subclavian artery
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Figure 1: CECT Chest (coronal cuts) showing posterior compression of the esophagus by the aberrant right subclavian artery

Mentions: A four-year-old female child presented to us with complaints of dysphagia and regurgitation of solid food. A contrast-enhanced CT scan (CECT) of the chest done elsewhere revealed an aberrant right subclavian artery [Figure 1]. A 256 slice CECT scan was ordered in our hospital for the exact anatomical characterization of the aberrant vessel. The scan showed an aberrant origin of the right subclavian artery from the medial wall of the descending thoracic aorta, just distal to the origin of the left subclavian artery [Figures 2 and 3]. The artery crossed to the right side at the level of the fourth thoracic vertebra, causing posterior compression of the esophagus. An additional finding that was noted was the common origin of the right and left common carotid arteries. The arch was left-sided, with a left descending thoracic aorta. An echocardiogram done showed a large ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) of 20 mm, with a dilated right atrium and right ventricle.


Dysphagia Lusoria with atrial septal defect: Simultaneous repair through midline.

Rathnakar R, Agarwal S, Datt V, Satsangi DK - Ann Pediatr Cardiol (2014)

CECT Chest (coronal cuts) showing posterior compression of the esophagus by the aberrant right subclavian artery
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3959066&req=5

Figure 1: CECT Chest (coronal cuts) showing posterior compression of the esophagus by the aberrant right subclavian artery
Mentions: A four-year-old female child presented to us with complaints of dysphagia and regurgitation of solid food. A contrast-enhanced CT scan (CECT) of the chest done elsewhere revealed an aberrant right subclavian artery [Figure 1]. A 256 slice CECT scan was ordered in our hospital for the exact anatomical characterization of the aberrant vessel. The scan showed an aberrant origin of the right subclavian artery from the medial wall of the descending thoracic aorta, just distal to the origin of the left subclavian artery [Figures 2 and 3]. The artery crossed to the right side at the level of the fourth thoracic vertebra, causing posterior compression of the esophagus. An additional finding that was noted was the common origin of the right and left common carotid arteries. The arch was left-sided, with a left descending thoracic aorta. An echocardiogram done showed a large ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) of 20 mm, with a dilated right atrium and right ventricle.

Bottom Line: An aberrant right subclavian artery from the descending aorta is almost always reported as an isolated anomaly.We believe that median sternotomy is the optimal surgical approach for the management of these lesions.Other operative approaches are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of CTVS, GB Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
An aberrant right subclavian artery from the descending aorta is almost always reported as an isolated anomaly. We present the case of a four-year-old child with an anomalous origin of the right subclavian artery from the descending aorta, associated with an ostium secundum atrial septal defect. The patient underwent simultaneous repair of both the anomalies through median sternotomy, with implantation of the subclavian artery into the right common carotid artery. We believe that median sternotomy is the optimal surgical approach for the management of these lesions. Other operative approaches are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus