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Umbilical venous catheter retrieval in a 970 gm neonate by a novel technique.

Nigam A, Trehan V, Mehta V - Ann Pediatr Cardiol (2014)

Bottom Line: Fractured and retained catheter fragments are one of them.Endoluminal retrieval of such a catheter is an uncommon and challenging procedure for the interventionist.Various techniques have been described for retrieval of such foreign bodies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, GB Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Umbilical venous catheterization is a necessity for the advanced care of very low birth weight neonates. Even with utmost care, few complications cannot be avoided. Fractured and retained catheter fragments are one of them. Endoluminal retrieval of such a catheter is an uncommon and challenging procedure for the interventionist. The only alternative is an open exploration of these patients. Various techniques have been described for retrieval of such foreign bodies. We describe a novel technique for percutaneous retrieval of an embolized umbilical venous catheter from a very low birth weight neonate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

UVC extending from IVC to pulmonary artery
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Figure 1: UVC extending from IVC to pulmonary artery

Mentions: A three-day-old 970-g infant born at 28 weeks' gestation had placement of an umbilical venous catheter (UVC) at the time of birth. Because there was no free flow of fluids through this UVC, removal of the catheter was attempted. During manipulation, the catheter got accidentally transected and embolized into the pulmonary artery with its one end still remaining in the inferior vena cava (IVC) [Figure 1]. We decided to retrieve the catheter percutaneously in view of extreme surgical risk involved.


Umbilical venous catheter retrieval in a 970 gm neonate by a novel technique.

Nigam A, Trehan V, Mehta V - Ann Pediatr Cardiol (2014)

UVC extending from IVC to pulmonary artery
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3959064&req=5

Figure 1: UVC extending from IVC to pulmonary artery
Mentions: A three-day-old 970-g infant born at 28 weeks' gestation had placement of an umbilical venous catheter (UVC) at the time of birth. Because there was no free flow of fluids through this UVC, removal of the catheter was attempted. During manipulation, the catheter got accidentally transected and embolized into the pulmonary artery with its one end still remaining in the inferior vena cava (IVC) [Figure 1]. We decided to retrieve the catheter percutaneously in view of extreme surgical risk involved.

Bottom Line: Fractured and retained catheter fragments are one of them.Endoluminal retrieval of such a catheter is an uncommon and challenging procedure for the interventionist.Various techniques have been described for retrieval of such foreign bodies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, GB Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Umbilical venous catheterization is a necessity for the advanced care of very low birth weight neonates. Even with utmost care, few complications cannot be avoided. Fractured and retained catheter fragments are one of them. Endoluminal retrieval of such a catheter is an uncommon and challenging procedure for the interventionist. The only alternative is an open exploration of these patients. Various techniques have been described for retrieval of such foreign bodies. We describe a novel technique for percutaneous retrieval of an embolized umbilical venous catheter from a very low birth weight neonate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus