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A comparative study of pathways to care for children with specific learning disability and mental retardation.

Chakraborty S, Kommu JV, Srinath S, Seshadri SP, Girimaji SC - Indian J Psychol Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The groups were divided into early contact (up to three carers) and late contact (more than three carers) and compared.While comparing both groups on the basis of early and late contact, mother's education was found to be significant in early contact group (P = 0.036) and having comorbidity was significant among late contacts (P = 0.038).Both the groups visit multiple carers including traditional healers substantiating the strong belief for supernatural causation of developmental disorders in India.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HAL Hospital, Bangalore, India.

ABSTRACT

Context: Early intervention in specific learning disability (SpLD) results in better outcome and prevents comorbidity. Understanding the pathways is therefore important.

Aims: To study and compare the pathways to care for children with SpLD and mental retardation (MR) before reaching a tertiary care center.

Settings and design material and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted for pathways to care of two groups: SpLD and MR with 50 children in each group from 8 to 16 years. MINI-KID for comorbidity and Goldberg's pathway to care instrument was used. The groups were divided into early contact (up to three carers) and late contact (more than three carers) and compared.

Statistical analysis: Data were analyzed using Statistical Packages for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 10.0 software.

Results: Majority (n = 24 or 48%) of SpLD children visited "others" (teachers, neighbors, relatives, and guardians of fellow classmates) as first carer. Allopathic practitioners were the first choice for MR children (n = 31 or 62%). Six children (12%) in SpLD group and 10 of MR (20%) group have seen either traditional practitioner or healer as first carer. Maximum referral to the tertiary center in both groups was done by others (62% in SpLD and 56% in MR group). Early contacts in SpLD group belonged to younger age group (P = 0.01). While comparing both groups on the basis of early and late contact, mother's education was found to be significant in early contact group (P = 0.036) and having comorbidity was significant among late contacts (P = 0.038).

Conclusions: The pathways to care for SpLD children are more or less similar to MR children whose parents recognize MR late. Both the groups visit multiple carers including traditional healers substantiating the strong belief for supernatural causation of developmental disorders in India.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Specific learning disability (SpLD) pathways
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Figure 1: Specific learning disability (SpLD) pathways

Mentions: The pathways followed by the SpLD and MR children have been depicted in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. Most of SpLD children's parents (n= 24 or 48%) consulted “others” (which include teachers, neighbors, relatives, and guardians of fellow classmates) as first contact and this group referred the maximum cases to our tertiary center (n = 31 or 62%). Next source of referral were the allopathic practitioners whom 20 (40%) children contacted first. Traditional healers (religious and faith healers) were favorites for four (8%) children and nine (18%) children consulted them after seeing others. For two children (4%), traditional practitioners (which include homeopathic, ayurvedic or unani practitioner) were the first carer. Fourteen children (28%) sought consultation from others after visiting allopathic practitioners while nine (18%) did the opposite [Figure 1].


A comparative study of pathways to care for children with specific learning disability and mental retardation.

Chakraborty S, Kommu JV, Srinath S, Seshadri SP, Girimaji SC - Indian J Psychol Med (2014)

Specific learning disability (SpLD) pathways
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3959014&req=5

Figure 1: Specific learning disability (SpLD) pathways
Mentions: The pathways followed by the SpLD and MR children have been depicted in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. Most of SpLD children's parents (n= 24 or 48%) consulted “others” (which include teachers, neighbors, relatives, and guardians of fellow classmates) as first contact and this group referred the maximum cases to our tertiary center (n = 31 or 62%). Next source of referral were the allopathic practitioners whom 20 (40%) children contacted first. Traditional healers (religious and faith healers) were favorites for four (8%) children and nine (18%) children consulted them after seeing others. For two children (4%), traditional practitioners (which include homeopathic, ayurvedic or unani practitioner) were the first carer. Fourteen children (28%) sought consultation from others after visiting allopathic practitioners while nine (18%) did the opposite [Figure 1].

Bottom Line: The groups were divided into early contact (up to three carers) and late contact (more than three carers) and compared.While comparing both groups on the basis of early and late contact, mother's education was found to be significant in early contact group (P = 0.036) and having comorbidity was significant among late contacts (P = 0.038).Both the groups visit multiple carers including traditional healers substantiating the strong belief for supernatural causation of developmental disorders in India.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HAL Hospital, Bangalore, India.

ABSTRACT

Context: Early intervention in specific learning disability (SpLD) results in better outcome and prevents comorbidity. Understanding the pathways is therefore important.

Aims: To study and compare the pathways to care for children with SpLD and mental retardation (MR) before reaching a tertiary care center.

Settings and design material and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted for pathways to care of two groups: SpLD and MR with 50 children in each group from 8 to 16 years. MINI-KID for comorbidity and Goldberg's pathway to care instrument was used. The groups were divided into early contact (up to three carers) and late contact (more than three carers) and compared.

Statistical analysis: Data were analyzed using Statistical Packages for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 10.0 software.

Results: Majority (n = 24 or 48%) of SpLD children visited "others" (teachers, neighbors, relatives, and guardians of fellow classmates) as first carer. Allopathic practitioners were the first choice for MR children (n = 31 or 62%). Six children (12%) in SpLD group and 10 of MR (20%) group have seen either traditional practitioner or healer as first carer. Maximum referral to the tertiary center in both groups was done by others (62% in SpLD and 56% in MR group). Early contacts in SpLD group belonged to younger age group (P = 0.01). While comparing both groups on the basis of early and late contact, mother's education was found to be significant in early contact group (P = 0.036) and having comorbidity was significant among late contacts (P = 0.038).

Conclusions: The pathways to care for SpLD children are more or less similar to MR children whose parents recognize MR late. Both the groups visit multiple carers including traditional healers substantiating the strong belief for supernatural causation of developmental disorders in India.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus