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Functional assessment for congenital heart disease.

Cheung YF - Korean Circ J (2014)

Bottom Line: Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease.Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern.Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Paediatric Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

ABSTRACT
Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease. Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern. Despite corrective or palliative repair of congenital heart lesions, the right ventricle, which may be the subpulmonary or systemic ventricular chamber, and the functional single ventricle are particularly vulnerable to functional impairment. Regular assessment of cardiac function constitutes an important aspect in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Echocardiography remains the most useful imaging modality for longitudinal monitoring of cardiac function. Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles. Advances in echocardiographic technologies including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography have enabled direct interrogation of myocardial deformation. In this review, the issues of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease, conventional echocardiographic and novel myocardial deformation imaging techniques, and clinical applications of these techniques in the functional assessment of congenital heart disease are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tissue Doppler imaging with the curser at the right ventricular free wall-tricuspid annular junction. a: late diastolic myocardial velocity, e: early diastolic myocardial velocity, IVA: isovolumic acceleration, s: systolic myocardial velocity, Δt: time difference, Δv: velocity change.
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Figure 3: Tissue Doppler imaging with the curser at the right ventricular free wall-tricuspid annular junction. a: late diastolic myocardial velocity, e: early diastolic myocardial velocity, IVA: isovolumic acceleration, s: systolic myocardial velocity, Δt: time difference, Δv: velocity change.

Mentions: From the spectral or colour tissue Doppler tracings, the peak systolic and two diastolic peak velocities can be measured (Fig. 3). The positive systolic peak represents annular motion towards the apex and reflects ventricular systolic function. The early negative diastolic annular velocity (e') reflects ventricular recoil from the contracted state. The late negative diastolic peak represents annular motion during atrial contraction and is affected by ventricular diastolic and atrial systolic function.


Functional assessment for congenital heart disease.

Cheung YF - Korean Circ J (2014)

Tissue Doppler imaging with the curser at the right ventricular free wall-tricuspid annular junction. a: late diastolic myocardial velocity, e: early diastolic myocardial velocity, IVA: isovolumic acceleration, s: systolic myocardial velocity, Δt: time difference, Δv: velocity change.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3958610&req=5

Figure 3: Tissue Doppler imaging with the curser at the right ventricular free wall-tricuspid annular junction. a: late diastolic myocardial velocity, e: early diastolic myocardial velocity, IVA: isovolumic acceleration, s: systolic myocardial velocity, Δt: time difference, Δv: velocity change.
Mentions: From the spectral or colour tissue Doppler tracings, the peak systolic and two diastolic peak velocities can be measured (Fig. 3). The positive systolic peak represents annular motion towards the apex and reflects ventricular systolic function. The early negative diastolic annular velocity (e') reflects ventricular recoil from the contracted state. The late negative diastolic peak represents annular motion during atrial contraction and is affected by ventricular diastolic and atrial systolic function.

Bottom Line: Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease.Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern.Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Paediatric Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

ABSTRACT
Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease. Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern. Despite corrective or palliative repair of congenital heart lesions, the right ventricle, which may be the subpulmonary or systemic ventricular chamber, and the functional single ventricle are particularly vulnerable to functional impairment. Regular assessment of cardiac function constitutes an important aspect in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Echocardiography remains the most useful imaging modality for longitudinal monitoring of cardiac function. Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles. Advances in echocardiographic technologies including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography have enabled direct interrogation of myocardial deformation. In this review, the issues of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease, conventional echocardiographic and novel myocardial deformation imaging techniques, and clinical applications of these techniques in the functional assessment of congenital heart disease are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus