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Driving interface based on tactile sensors for electric wheelchairs or trolleys.

Trujillo-León A, Vidal-Verdú F - Sensors (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: When the user interacts with the handle of the chair or trolley, he or she exerts a pressure pattern that depends on the intention to accelerate, brake or turn to the left or right.These signals are equivalent to those provided by a joystick.This proposal aims to help disabled people and their attendees and prolong the personal autonomy in a context of aging populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electronics, University of Málaga, Málaga 29071, Spain. atrujilloleon@uma.es.

ABSTRACT
This paper introduces a novel device based on a tactile interface to replace the attendant joystick in electric wheelchairs. It can also be used in other vehicles such as shopping trolleys. Its use allows intuitive driving that requires little or no training, so its usability is high. This is achieved by a tactile sensor located on the handlebar of the chair or trolley and the processing of the information provided by it. When the user interacts with the handle of the chair or trolley, he or she exerts a pressure pattern that depends on the intention to accelerate, brake or turn to the left or right. The electronics within the device then perform the signal conditioning and processing of the information received, identifying the intention of the user on the basis of this pattern using an algorithm, and translating it into control signals for the control module of the wheelchair. These signals are equivalent to those provided by a joystick. This proposal aims to help disabled people and their attendees and prolong the personal autonomy in a context of aging populations.

No MeSH data available.


Test path: third user.
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f22-sensors-14-02644: Test path: third user.

Mentions: To see its performance under different conditions, six volunteers were asked to drive the chair following the path shown in Figure 19. Note that this path has tight turns to the left and right. The results can be seen in videos attached to this paper. Moreover, Figures 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25 summarize them by superimposing a few selected frames. The resulting photograph shows the sequence of the movement along the path. In these tests, the user of Figure 20 had experience in driving the chair. The users of Figures 21 and 22 had driven the chair in different contexts a few times, for periods below 15 min in total.


Driving interface based on tactile sensors for electric wheelchairs or trolleys.

Trujillo-León A, Vidal-Verdú F - Sensors (Basel) (2014)

Test path: third user.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3958251&req=5

f22-sensors-14-02644: Test path: third user.
Mentions: To see its performance under different conditions, six volunteers were asked to drive the chair following the path shown in Figure 19. Note that this path has tight turns to the left and right. The results can be seen in videos attached to this paper. Moreover, Figures 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25 summarize them by superimposing a few selected frames. The resulting photograph shows the sequence of the movement along the path. In these tests, the user of Figure 20 had experience in driving the chair. The users of Figures 21 and 22 had driven the chair in different contexts a few times, for periods below 15 min in total.

Bottom Line: When the user interacts with the handle of the chair or trolley, he or she exerts a pressure pattern that depends on the intention to accelerate, brake or turn to the left or right.These signals are equivalent to those provided by a joystick.This proposal aims to help disabled people and their attendees and prolong the personal autonomy in a context of aging populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electronics, University of Málaga, Málaga 29071, Spain. atrujilloleon@uma.es.

ABSTRACT
This paper introduces a novel device based on a tactile interface to replace the attendant joystick in electric wheelchairs. It can also be used in other vehicles such as shopping trolleys. Its use allows intuitive driving that requires little or no training, so its usability is high. This is achieved by a tactile sensor located on the handlebar of the chair or trolley and the processing of the information provided by it. When the user interacts with the handle of the chair or trolley, he or she exerts a pressure pattern that depends on the intention to accelerate, brake or turn to the left or right. The electronics within the device then perform the signal conditioning and processing of the information received, identifying the intention of the user on the basis of this pattern using an algorithm, and translating it into control signals for the control module of the wheelchair. These signals are equivalent to those provided by a joystick. This proposal aims to help disabled people and their attendees and prolong the personal autonomy in a context of aging populations.

No MeSH data available.