Limits...
Towards whole body fatigue assessment of human movement: a fatigue-tracking system based on combined sEMG and accelerometer signals.

Dong H, Ugalde I, Figueroa N, El Saddik A - Sensors (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: This assumption is verified with a rigorous statistical analysis.Based on this proven linearity, localized muscular fatigue is simplified as a linear model.The developed fatigue-tracking system is evaluated with two fatigue experiments (in which 10 male subjects and seven female subjects participated), including holding self-weight (dip start position training) and lifting weight with one arm (arm curl training).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Ottawa, 800 King Edward, K1N 6N5, Ottawa, ON, Canada. hdong@uottawa.ca.

ABSTRACT
This paper proposes a method to assess the overall fatigue of human body movement. First of all, according to previous research regarding localized muscular fatigue, a linear relation is assumed between the mean frequency and the muscular working time when the muscle is experiencing fatigue. This assumption is verified with a rigorous statistical analysis. Based on this proven linearity, localized muscular fatigue is simplified as a linear model. Furthermore, localized muscular fatigue is considered a dynamic process and, hence, the localized fatigue levels are tracked by updating the parameters with the most current surface electromyogram (sEMG) measurements. Finally, an overall fatigue level is computed by fusing localized muscular fatigue levels. The developed fatigue-tracking system is evaluated with two fatigue experiments (in which 10 male subjects and seven female subjects participated), including holding self-weight (dip start position training) and lifting weight with one arm (arm curl training).

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Fatigue experiment settings. (a) In Experiment 1, the subject was asked to hold their self-body weight by arms (dip start position training). (b) In Experiment 2, the subject was asked to repeatedly lift up the weight with their right arm (arm curl training). (c) The experiment equipment included a video camera, a wireless communication station, and a central processing PC.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3958247&req=5

f3-sensors-14-02052: Fatigue experiment settings. (a) In Experiment 1, the subject was asked to hold their self-body weight by arms (dip start position training). (b) In Experiment 2, the subject was asked to repeatedly lift up the weight with their right arm (arm curl training). (c) The experiment equipment included a video camera, a wireless communication station, and a central processing PC.

Mentions: We conducted two experiments for the verification of our method (Figure 3). The experiment procedures have been approved by the university's committee. In Experiment 1, the subjects are asked to hold their self-body weight with both arms for a period of time (dip start position training); in Experiment 2, the subjects were asked to periodically lift a weight (10 kg for males, and 6 kg for females) with their right arm (arm curl training). In total, 17 subjects, including 10 males and 7 females, were studied (mean ± SD): age 30.47 ± 6 years; body mass 71.71 ± 16.81 kg; body height 172.82 ± 11.25 cm; and body mass index (BMI) 23.86 ± 4.03 kg/m2. Before initiating the experiment, the subjects were briefed with the experiment's purpose and procedures. The subjects were asked to attach the sEMG sensors on the following muscle groups: biceps brachii, anterior deltoids, and triceps brachii. Taking into account the muscles measured in the experiments, shaving body hair were not necessary. The skin of each subject was cleaned with 90% alcohol and then the sensors were attached using double faced adhesive tape (based on the instructions of the Delsys sensors).


Towards whole body fatigue assessment of human movement: a fatigue-tracking system based on combined sEMG and accelerometer signals.

Dong H, Ugalde I, Figueroa N, El Saddik A - Sensors (Basel) (2014)

Fatigue experiment settings. (a) In Experiment 1, the subject was asked to hold their self-body weight by arms (dip start position training). (b) In Experiment 2, the subject was asked to repeatedly lift up the weight with their right arm (arm curl training). (c) The experiment equipment included a video camera, a wireless communication station, and a central processing PC.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3958247&req=5

f3-sensors-14-02052: Fatigue experiment settings. (a) In Experiment 1, the subject was asked to hold their self-body weight by arms (dip start position training). (b) In Experiment 2, the subject was asked to repeatedly lift up the weight with their right arm (arm curl training). (c) The experiment equipment included a video camera, a wireless communication station, and a central processing PC.
Mentions: We conducted two experiments for the verification of our method (Figure 3). The experiment procedures have been approved by the university's committee. In Experiment 1, the subjects are asked to hold their self-body weight with both arms for a period of time (dip start position training); in Experiment 2, the subjects were asked to periodically lift a weight (10 kg for males, and 6 kg for females) with their right arm (arm curl training). In total, 17 subjects, including 10 males and 7 females, were studied (mean ± SD): age 30.47 ± 6 years; body mass 71.71 ± 16.81 kg; body height 172.82 ± 11.25 cm; and body mass index (BMI) 23.86 ± 4.03 kg/m2. Before initiating the experiment, the subjects were briefed with the experiment's purpose and procedures. The subjects were asked to attach the sEMG sensors on the following muscle groups: biceps brachii, anterior deltoids, and triceps brachii. Taking into account the muscles measured in the experiments, shaving body hair were not necessary. The skin of each subject was cleaned with 90% alcohol and then the sensors were attached using double faced adhesive tape (based on the instructions of the Delsys sensors).

Bottom Line: This assumption is verified with a rigorous statistical analysis.Based on this proven linearity, localized muscular fatigue is simplified as a linear model.The developed fatigue-tracking system is evaluated with two fatigue experiments (in which 10 male subjects and seven female subjects participated), including holding self-weight (dip start position training) and lifting weight with one arm (arm curl training).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Ottawa, 800 King Edward, K1N 6N5, Ottawa, ON, Canada. hdong@uottawa.ca.

ABSTRACT
This paper proposes a method to assess the overall fatigue of human body movement. First of all, according to previous research regarding localized muscular fatigue, a linear relation is assumed between the mean frequency and the muscular working time when the muscle is experiencing fatigue. This assumption is verified with a rigorous statistical analysis. Based on this proven linearity, localized muscular fatigue is simplified as a linear model. Furthermore, localized muscular fatigue is considered a dynamic process and, hence, the localized fatigue levels are tracked by updating the parameters with the most current surface electromyogram (sEMG) measurements. Finally, an overall fatigue level is computed by fusing localized muscular fatigue levels. The developed fatigue-tracking system is evaluated with two fatigue experiments (in which 10 male subjects and seven female subjects participated), including holding self-weight (dip start position training) and lifting weight with one arm (arm curl training).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus