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Implementation and performance of a GPS/INS tightly coupled assisted PLL architecture using MEMS inertial sensors.

Tawk Y, Tomé P, Botteron C, Stebler Y, Farine PA - Sensors (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: The use of global navigation satellite system receivers for navigation still presents many challenges in urban canyon and indoor environments, where satellite availability is typically reduced and received signals are attenuated.In particular, we propose a GPS/INS Tightly Coupled Assisted PLL (TCAPLL) architecture, and present most of the associated challenges that need to be addressed when dealing with very-low-performance MEMS inertial sensors.Finally, the architecture is evaluated through a test campaign using a vehicle that is driven in urban environments, with the purpose of highlighting the pros and cons of combining MEMS inertial sensors with GPS over GPS alone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Electronics and Signal Processing Laboratory, Neuchâtel, Switzerland. youssef.tawk@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The use of global navigation satellite system receivers for navigation still presents many challenges in urban canyon and indoor environments, where satellite availability is typically reduced and received signals are attenuated. To improve the navigation performance in such environments, several enhancement methods can be implemented. For instance, external aid provided through coupling with other sensors has proven to contribute substantially to enhancing navigation performance and robustness. Within this context, coupling a very simple GPS receiver with an Inertial Navigation System (INS) based on low-cost micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) inertial sensors is considered in this paper. In particular, we propose a GPS/INS Tightly Coupled Assisted PLL (TCAPLL) architecture, and present most of the associated challenges that need to be addressed when dealing with very-low-performance MEMS inertial sensors. In addition, we propose a data monitoring system in charge of checking the quality of the measurement flow in the architecture. The implementation of the TCAPLL is discussed in detail, and its performance under different scenarios is assessed. Finally, the architecture is evaluated through a test campaign using a vehicle that is driven in urban environments, with the purpose of highlighting the pros and cons of combining MEMS inertial sensors with GPS over GPS alone.

No MeSH data available.


Setup used for the field vehicle test measurements.
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f24-sensors-14-03768: Setup used for the field vehicle test measurements.

Mentions: The objective of the measurement campaign is to validate the simulation results obtained in the previous section, and to evaluate the TCAPLL architecture under realistic conditions. The campaign consists of driving a vehicle in urban canyon environments, while capturing GPS signals using an RF front-end, logging IMU measurements using MEMS inertial sensors, and computing a reference trajectory using a tactical grade IMU. The acquired data are post-processed in the laboratory using the TCAPLL architecture to derive a navigation solution. The instrumental setup used is shown in Figure 24 and it is composed of the following parts. The AIRINS navigation grade Georeferencing and Orientation System from IXSEA [27]. The MTi-G Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS) from Xsens [28] that contains a MEMS-based IMU, magnetometers, an integrated GPS receiver, a static pressure sensor and a temperature sensor. The Alpha GNSS RTK receiver from JAVAD [29]. The Stereo RF Front-End from NSL [30], which is used to acquire GPS signals in view, then down-convert, digitize and save them on a PC. In addition, multiple GNSS antennas covering the L1/L2 bands are also used. Figure 25 shows the test vehicle mounted with the measurement platform.


Implementation and performance of a GPS/INS tightly coupled assisted PLL architecture using MEMS inertial sensors.

Tawk Y, Tomé P, Botteron C, Stebler Y, Farine PA - Sensors (Basel) (2014)

Setup used for the field vehicle test measurements.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3958239&req=5

f24-sensors-14-03768: Setup used for the field vehicle test measurements.
Mentions: The objective of the measurement campaign is to validate the simulation results obtained in the previous section, and to evaluate the TCAPLL architecture under realistic conditions. The campaign consists of driving a vehicle in urban canyon environments, while capturing GPS signals using an RF front-end, logging IMU measurements using MEMS inertial sensors, and computing a reference trajectory using a tactical grade IMU. The acquired data are post-processed in the laboratory using the TCAPLL architecture to derive a navigation solution. The instrumental setup used is shown in Figure 24 and it is composed of the following parts. The AIRINS navigation grade Georeferencing and Orientation System from IXSEA [27]. The MTi-G Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS) from Xsens [28] that contains a MEMS-based IMU, magnetometers, an integrated GPS receiver, a static pressure sensor and a temperature sensor. The Alpha GNSS RTK receiver from JAVAD [29]. The Stereo RF Front-End from NSL [30], which is used to acquire GPS signals in view, then down-convert, digitize and save them on a PC. In addition, multiple GNSS antennas covering the L1/L2 bands are also used. Figure 25 shows the test vehicle mounted with the measurement platform.

Bottom Line: The use of global navigation satellite system receivers for navigation still presents many challenges in urban canyon and indoor environments, where satellite availability is typically reduced and received signals are attenuated.In particular, we propose a GPS/INS Tightly Coupled Assisted PLL (TCAPLL) architecture, and present most of the associated challenges that need to be addressed when dealing with very-low-performance MEMS inertial sensors.Finally, the architecture is evaluated through a test campaign using a vehicle that is driven in urban environments, with the purpose of highlighting the pros and cons of combining MEMS inertial sensors with GPS over GPS alone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Electronics and Signal Processing Laboratory, Neuchâtel, Switzerland. youssef.tawk@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The use of global navigation satellite system receivers for navigation still presents many challenges in urban canyon and indoor environments, where satellite availability is typically reduced and received signals are attenuated. To improve the navigation performance in such environments, several enhancement methods can be implemented. For instance, external aid provided through coupling with other sensors has proven to contribute substantially to enhancing navigation performance and robustness. Within this context, coupling a very simple GPS receiver with an Inertial Navigation System (INS) based on low-cost micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) inertial sensors is considered in this paper. In particular, we propose a GPS/INS Tightly Coupled Assisted PLL (TCAPLL) architecture, and present most of the associated challenges that need to be addressed when dealing with very-low-performance MEMS inertial sensors. In addition, we propose a data monitoring system in charge of checking the quality of the measurement flow in the architecture. The implementation of the TCAPLL is discussed in detail, and its performance under different scenarios is assessed. Finally, the architecture is evaluated through a test campaign using a vehicle that is driven in urban environments, with the purpose of highlighting the pros and cons of combining MEMS inertial sensors with GPS over GPS alone.

No MeSH data available.