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Enhanced production of Aspergillus tamarii lipase for recovery of fat from tannery fleshings.

Dayanandan A, Rani SH, Shanmugavel M, Gnanamani A, Rajakumar GS - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2014)

Bottom Line: The enzyme shows maximum activity at pH 7.0, temperature 50 °C and was stable between the pH 5.0-8.0 and temperature up to 60 °C.Crude lipase (3%) applied to tannery fleshing shows 92% fat solubility.The results demonstrate that fat obtained from tannery fleshing, a by-product of the leather industry has a high potential for biodiesel production and the proteinaceous residue obtained can be used as animal feed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Central Leather Research Institute, Tamil Nadu, New Delhi.

ABSTRACT
The influence of various oil cakes has been investigated for high level production of lipase using Aspergillus tamarii MTCC 5152. By solid state fermentation in wheat bran containing 2.5% w/w gingili oil cake at 70% v/w moisture content the fungus produced a maximal yield of lipase (758 ± 3.61 u/g) after 5 days of incubation using 2% v/w inoculum containing 10(6) spores/mL. Wheat bran and gingili oil cake with supplementation of gingili oil (1.0% w/w), glucose (0.5% w/w) and peptone (0.5% w/w) gives an increased enzyme production of 793 ± 6.56 u/g. The enzyme shows maximum activity at pH 7.0, temperature 50 °C and was stable between the pH 5.0-8.0 and temperature up to 60 °C. Crude lipase (3%) applied to tannery fleshing shows 92% fat solubility. The results demonstrate that fat obtained from tannery fleshing, a by-product of the leather industry has a high potential for biodiesel production and the proteinaceous residue obtained can be used as animal feed.

Show MeSH
Effect of temperature on activity and stability of lipase.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f5-bmj-44-4-1089: Effect of temperature on activity and stability of lipase.

Mentions: Lipase activity determined at different temperatures has been presented in Figure 5. The reaction rate increased significantly over the temperature range from 30–50 °C, but then it decreased slightly. The enzyme exhibited maximum activity at 50 °C. The lipase was quite stable at room temperature and the enzyme maintained good stability and was stable up to 50 °C. At 60 °C, 90% activity was retained and above 60 °C the enzyme gradually loses its activity suggesting that the enzyme is thermostable. Moderately thermostable lipases were also reported from P. wortmanii and P. simplicissimum (Costa and Peralta, 1999; Gutarra et al., 2009). These lipases were found to retain 55% and 90%, of their residual activity at 50 °C.


Enhanced production of Aspergillus tamarii lipase for recovery of fat from tannery fleshings.

Dayanandan A, Rani SH, Shanmugavel M, Gnanamani A, Rajakumar GS - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2014)

Effect of temperature on activity and stability of lipase.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3958173&req=5

f5-bmj-44-4-1089: Effect of temperature on activity and stability of lipase.
Mentions: Lipase activity determined at different temperatures has been presented in Figure 5. The reaction rate increased significantly over the temperature range from 30–50 °C, but then it decreased slightly. The enzyme exhibited maximum activity at 50 °C. The lipase was quite stable at room temperature and the enzyme maintained good stability and was stable up to 50 °C. At 60 °C, 90% activity was retained and above 60 °C the enzyme gradually loses its activity suggesting that the enzyme is thermostable. Moderately thermostable lipases were also reported from P. wortmanii and P. simplicissimum (Costa and Peralta, 1999; Gutarra et al., 2009). These lipases were found to retain 55% and 90%, of their residual activity at 50 °C.

Bottom Line: The enzyme shows maximum activity at pH 7.0, temperature 50 °C and was stable between the pH 5.0-8.0 and temperature up to 60 °C.Crude lipase (3%) applied to tannery fleshing shows 92% fat solubility.The results demonstrate that fat obtained from tannery fleshing, a by-product of the leather industry has a high potential for biodiesel production and the proteinaceous residue obtained can be used as animal feed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Central Leather Research Institute, Tamil Nadu, New Delhi.

ABSTRACT
The influence of various oil cakes has been investigated for high level production of lipase using Aspergillus tamarii MTCC 5152. By solid state fermentation in wheat bran containing 2.5% w/w gingili oil cake at 70% v/w moisture content the fungus produced a maximal yield of lipase (758 ± 3.61 u/g) after 5 days of incubation using 2% v/w inoculum containing 10(6) spores/mL. Wheat bran and gingili oil cake with supplementation of gingili oil (1.0% w/w), glucose (0.5% w/w) and peptone (0.5% w/w) gives an increased enzyme production of 793 ± 6.56 u/g. The enzyme shows maximum activity at pH 7.0, temperature 50 °C and was stable between the pH 5.0-8.0 and temperature up to 60 °C. Crude lipase (3%) applied to tannery fleshing shows 92% fat solubility. The results demonstrate that fat obtained from tannery fleshing, a by-product of the leather industry has a high potential for biodiesel production and the proteinaceous residue obtained can be used as animal feed.

Show MeSH