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Sperm storage in the female reproductive tract in birds.

Sasanami T, Matsuzaki M, Mizushima S, Hiyama G - J. Reprod. Dev. (2013)

Bottom Line: The ability to store sperm in the female genital tract is frequently observed in vertebrates as well as in invertebrates.Because of the presence of a system that maintains the ejaculated sperm alive in the female reproductive tract in a variety of animals, this strategy appears to be advantageous for animal reproduction.In avian species, the specialized simple tubular invaginations referred to as sperm storage tubules (SSTs) are found in the oviduct as a sperm storage organ.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The ability to store sperm in the female genital tract is frequently observed in vertebrates as well as in invertebrates. Because of the presence of a system that maintains the ejaculated sperm alive in the female reproductive tract in a variety of animals, this strategy appears to be advantageous for animal reproduction. Although the occurrence and physiological reasons for sperm storage have been reported extensively in many species, the mechanism of sperm storage in the female reproductive tract has been poorly understood until recently. In avian species, the specialized simple tubular invaginations referred to as sperm storage tubules (SSTs) are found in the oviduct as a sperm storage organ. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanism of sperm uptake into the SSTs, maintenance within it, and controlled release of the sperm from the SSTs. Since sperm storage in avian species occurs at high body temperatures (i.e., 41 C), elucidation of the mechanism for sperm storage may lead to the development of new strategies for sperm preservation at ambient temperatures, and these could be used in a myriad of applications in the field of reproduction.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic drawing of an avian oviduct. After ovulation, the oocyte is incorporatedinto the infundibulum part of the oviduct, and the sperm ascending the oviductfertilizes the oocyte within 15 min of ovulation. After fertilization, the surface ofthe zygote is enveloped by several egg envelopes (i.e., albumen, shell membrane, eggshell and cuticle) through the passage of the oviduct, and is oviposited outside of thebody. The position of the utero-vaginal junction is indicated by an arrow. Theapproximate time of zygote residency within each part of the oviduct is alsoindicated.
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fig_001: Schematic drawing of an avian oviduct. After ovulation, the oocyte is incorporatedinto the infundibulum part of the oviduct, and the sperm ascending the oviductfertilizes the oocyte within 15 min of ovulation. After fertilization, the surface ofthe zygote is enveloped by several egg envelopes (i.e., albumen, shell membrane, eggshell and cuticle) through the passage of the oviduct, and is oviposited outside of thebody. The position of the utero-vaginal junction is indicated by an arrow. Theapproximate time of zygote residency within each part of the oviduct is alsoindicated.

Mentions: In avian species, specialized simple tubular invaginations referred to as sperm storagetubules (SSTs) are found in the oviduct [10,11,12,13]. Because of the presence of this structure, onceejaculated sperm have entered the female reproductive tract, they can survive up to 2–15 weeksin domestic birds, including chickens, turkeys, quails and ducks, depending on the species[14, 15] incontrast to the relatively short life span of mammalian spermatozoa (i.e., several days). SSTsare located in the lamina propria of mucosal folds in the utero-vaginal junction (UVJ) (Fig. 1Fig. 1.


Sperm storage in the female reproductive tract in birds.

Sasanami T, Matsuzaki M, Mizushima S, Hiyama G - J. Reprod. Dev. (2013)

Schematic drawing of an avian oviduct. After ovulation, the oocyte is incorporatedinto the infundibulum part of the oviduct, and the sperm ascending the oviductfertilizes the oocyte within 15 min of ovulation. After fertilization, the surface ofthe zygote is enveloped by several egg envelopes (i.e., albumen, shell membrane, eggshell and cuticle) through the passage of the oviduct, and is oviposited outside of thebody. The position of the utero-vaginal junction is indicated by an arrow. Theapproximate time of zygote residency within each part of the oviduct is alsoindicated.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3944358&req=5

fig_001: Schematic drawing of an avian oviduct. After ovulation, the oocyte is incorporatedinto the infundibulum part of the oviduct, and the sperm ascending the oviductfertilizes the oocyte within 15 min of ovulation. After fertilization, the surface ofthe zygote is enveloped by several egg envelopes (i.e., albumen, shell membrane, eggshell and cuticle) through the passage of the oviduct, and is oviposited outside of thebody. The position of the utero-vaginal junction is indicated by an arrow. Theapproximate time of zygote residency within each part of the oviduct is alsoindicated.
Mentions: In avian species, specialized simple tubular invaginations referred to as sperm storagetubules (SSTs) are found in the oviduct [10,11,12,13]. Because of the presence of this structure, onceejaculated sperm have entered the female reproductive tract, they can survive up to 2–15 weeksin domestic birds, including chickens, turkeys, quails and ducks, depending on the species[14, 15] incontrast to the relatively short life span of mammalian spermatozoa (i.e., several days). SSTsare located in the lamina propria of mucosal folds in the utero-vaginal junction (UVJ) (Fig. 1Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: The ability to store sperm in the female genital tract is frequently observed in vertebrates as well as in invertebrates.Because of the presence of a system that maintains the ejaculated sperm alive in the female reproductive tract in a variety of animals, this strategy appears to be advantageous for animal reproduction.In avian species, the specialized simple tubular invaginations referred to as sperm storage tubules (SSTs) are found in the oviduct as a sperm storage organ.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The ability to store sperm in the female genital tract is frequently observed in vertebrates as well as in invertebrates. Because of the presence of a system that maintains the ejaculated sperm alive in the female reproductive tract in a variety of animals, this strategy appears to be advantageous for animal reproduction. Although the occurrence and physiological reasons for sperm storage have been reported extensively in many species, the mechanism of sperm storage in the female reproductive tract has been poorly understood until recently. In avian species, the specialized simple tubular invaginations referred to as sperm storage tubules (SSTs) are found in the oviduct as a sperm storage organ. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanism of sperm uptake into the SSTs, maintenance within it, and controlled release of the sperm from the SSTs. Since sperm storage in avian species occurs at high body temperatures (i.e., 41 C), elucidation of the mechanism for sperm storage may lead to the development of new strategies for sperm preservation at ambient temperatures, and these could be used in a myriad of applications in the field of reproduction.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus