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Genetic inheritance of female and male morphotypes in giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

Dinh H, Nguyen NH - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The low and significantly different from one genetic correlations between the expressions of body weight in male morphotypes also suggest that these traits should be treated as genetically different traits in selective breeding programs.Body weight showed negative genetic associations with SM (-0.96), whereas those of body weight with other male morphotypes were positive (0.25 to 0.76).Our results showed that there is existence of heritable (additive genetic) component for male morphotypes, giving prospects for genetic selection to change population structure of GFP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Aquaculture No.2, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

ABSTRACT
Giant freshwater prawn (GFP) Macrobrachium rosenbergii is unique with males categorized in five different morphotypes (small claw, orange claw, blue claw, old blue claw and no claw males) and females in three reproductive statuses (mature ovary, berried and spawned females). In the present study we examined genetic inheritance of female and male morphotypes, their body weights and genetic associations between morphotypes and body traits. Restricted maximum likelihood fitting a multi-trait animal model was performed on a total of 21,459 body records collected over five generations in a GFP population selected for high growth rate. The estimates of variance components showed that there were substantial differences in additive genetic variance in body weight between male morphotypes. The low and significantly different from one genetic correlations between the expressions of body weight in male morphotypes also suggest that these traits should be treated as genetically different traits in selective breeding programs. By contrast, body weights of female types are essentially the same characters as indicated by the high genetic correlations between homologous trait expressions. In addition to body weight, male morphotypes and female reproductive statuses were treated as traits in themselves and were analysed as binary observations using animal and sire linear mixed models, and logit and probit threshold models. The estimates of heritability back-transformed from the liability scale were in good agreement with those obtained from linear mixed models, ranging from 0.02 to 0.43 for male morphotypes and 0.06 to 0.10 for female types. The genetic correlations among male morphoptypes were generally favourable. Body weight showed negative genetic associations with SM (-0.96), whereas those of body weight with other male morphotypes were positive (0.25 to 0.76). Our results showed that there is existence of heritable (additive genetic) component for male morphotypes, giving prospects for genetic selection to change population structure of GFP.

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Mature ovary female.
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pone-0090142-g006: Mature ovary female.

Mentions: Proportions of male morphotypes, females groups categorised according to their reproduction statuses and their body weights are given in Table 2. For males, orange claw morphotype (OM) accounted for the largest proportion (54%), followed by blue (18%) and small claw males (16%). Both old blue claw (OBC) and no claw (NC) males made up 12% of the total male morphotypes. There was almost no difference in proportion of females categorized according to their reproductive statuses. Variation in proportions of male morphotypes and female reproductive statuses among 576 full- and half-sib families produced between 2008 and 2012 is graphically shown in Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Both Chi-square test and Wald F statistic showed significant differences (P<0.05 to 0.001) in composition of male morphotypes among families within the same pond and generations or across ponds and generations. For example, the proportion of SM, OC, BC, OBC and NC in one grow-out pond in the latest generation (2012) was 17.2, 52.2, 23.1, 1.2 and 6.2%, respectively. Across ponds and generations, there was also a large variation in male morphotype among families, ranging from 1.1 to 100.0% for BC or 1.2 to 98.8% for SM.


Genetic inheritance of female and male morphotypes in giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

Dinh H, Nguyen NH - PLoS ONE (2014)

Mature ovary female.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3935996&req=5

pone-0090142-g006: Mature ovary female.
Mentions: Proportions of male morphotypes, females groups categorised according to their reproduction statuses and their body weights are given in Table 2. For males, orange claw morphotype (OM) accounted for the largest proportion (54%), followed by blue (18%) and small claw males (16%). Both old blue claw (OBC) and no claw (NC) males made up 12% of the total male morphotypes. There was almost no difference in proportion of females categorized according to their reproductive statuses. Variation in proportions of male morphotypes and female reproductive statuses among 576 full- and half-sib families produced between 2008 and 2012 is graphically shown in Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Both Chi-square test and Wald F statistic showed significant differences (P<0.05 to 0.001) in composition of male morphotypes among families within the same pond and generations or across ponds and generations. For example, the proportion of SM, OC, BC, OBC and NC in one grow-out pond in the latest generation (2012) was 17.2, 52.2, 23.1, 1.2 and 6.2%, respectively. Across ponds and generations, there was also a large variation in male morphotype among families, ranging from 1.1 to 100.0% for BC or 1.2 to 98.8% for SM.

Bottom Line: The low and significantly different from one genetic correlations between the expressions of body weight in male morphotypes also suggest that these traits should be treated as genetically different traits in selective breeding programs.Body weight showed negative genetic associations with SM (-0.96), whereas those of body weight with other male morphotypes were positive (0.25 to 0.76).Our results showed that there is existence of heritable (additive genetic) component for male morphotypes, giving prospects for genetic selection to change population structure of GFP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Aquaculture No.2, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

ABSTRACT
Giant freshwater prawn (GFP) Macrobrachium rosenbergii is unique with males categorized in five different morphotypes (small claw, orange claw, blue claw, old blue claw and no claw males) and females in three reproductive statuses (mature ovary, berried and spawned females). In the present study we examined genetic inheritance of female and male morphotypes, their body weights and genetic associations between morphotypes and body traits. Restricted maximum likelihood fitting a multi-trait animal model was performed on a total of 21,459 body records collected over five generations in a GFP population selected for high growth rate. The estimates of variance components showed that there were substantial differences in additive genetic variance in body weight between male morphotypes. The low and significantly different from one genetic correlations between the expressions of body weight in male morphotypes also suggest that these traits should be treated as genetically different traits in selective breeding programs. By contrast, body weights of female types are essentially the same characters as indicated by the high genetic correlations between homologous trait expressions. In addition to body weight, male morphotypes and female reproductive statuses were treated as traits in themselves and were analysed as binary observations using animal and sire linear mixed models, and logit and probit threshold models. The estimates of heritability back-transformed from the liability scale were in good agreement with those obtained from linear mixed models, ranging from 0.02 to 0.43 for male morphotypes and 0.06 to 0.10 for female types. The genetic correlations among male morphoptypes were generally favourable. Body weight showed negative genetic associations with SM (-0.96), whereas those of body weight with other male morphotypes were positive (0.25 to 0.76). Our results showed that there is existence of heritable (additive genetic) component for male morphotypes, giving prospects for genetic selection to change population structure of GFP.

Show MeSH