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Whole body vibration training--improving balance control and muscle endurance.

Ritzmann R, Kramer A, Bernhardt S, Gollhofer A - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The statistical analysis revealed significant interaction effects of group×time for balance and local static muscle endurance (p<0.05).The effect on jump height remained insignificant (pre vs. post VIB +3%, p = 0.25 and CON ±0%, p = 0.82).As far as balance and muscle endurance of the lower leg are concerned, a training program that includes WBV can provide supplementary benefits in young and well-trained adults compared to an equivalent program that does not include WBV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Sport and Sport Science, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Exercise combined with whole body vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular, although additional effects of WBV in comparison to conventional exercises are still discussed controversially in literature. Heterogeneous findings are attributed to large differences in the training designs between WBV and "control" groups in regard to training volume, load and type. In order to separate the additional effects of WBV from the overall adaptations due to the intervention, in this study, a four-week WBV training setup was compared to a matched intervention program with identical training parameters in both training settings except for the exposure to WBV. In a repeated-measures matched-subject design, 38 participants were assigned to either the WBV group (VIB) or the equivalent training group (CON). Training duration, number of sets, rest periods and task-specific instructions were matched between the groups. Balance, jump height and local static muscle endurance were assessed before and after the training period. The statistical analysis revealed significant interaction effects of group×time for balance and local static muscle endurance (p<0.05). Hence, WBV caused an additional effect on balance control (pre vs. post VIB +13%, p<0.05 and CON +6%, p = 0.33) and local static muscle endurance (pre vs. post VIB +36%, p<0.05 and CON +11%, p = 0.49). The effect on jump height remained insignificant (pre vs. post VIB +3%, p = 0.25 and CON ±0%, p = 0.82). This study provides evidence for the additional effects of WBV above conventional exercise alone. As far as balance and muscle endurance of the lower leg are concerned, a training program that includes WBV can provide supplementary benefits in young and well-trained adults compared to an equivalent program that does not include WBV.

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Reduction in COP displacement in two representative subjects of the VIB and CON group.Centre of pressure (COP) displacement of one subject of the whole body vibration (VIB) group (A and B) and one subject of the equivalent training (CON) group (C and D) in anterior-posterior (a–p) and medio-lateral (m-l) direction before and after the training interventions. The participants of both training groups trained in an upright standing position with a knee flexion of 10° in the forefoot stance.
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pone-0089905-g001: Reduction in COP displacement in two representative subjects of the VIB and CON group.Centre of pressure (COP) displacement of one subject of the whole body vibration (VIB) group (A and B) and one subject of the equivalent training (CON) group (C and D) in anterior-posterior (a–p) and medio-lateral (m-l) direction before and after the training interventions. The participants of both training groups trained in an upright standing position with a knee flexion of 10° in the forefoot stance.

Mentions: All participants trained for a period of four weeks with three training sessions per week and at least one day of rest between two sessions. All sessions were documented, surveyed, and supervised by the authors of the study. In order to separate the WBV effects from the overall adaptations due to plain intervention, the training of the CON group was matched with the training of the WBV group, i.e. training duration, number of sets, rest periods and task-specific instructions were identical for both groups (Table 1). For all subjects, one training session consisted of two sets. The duration of the first set was established at 3 min in the first week, 5 min in the second and 8 min in the third and fourth week, respectively. For the second set the subjects trained until exhaustion, however, duration was limited to 20 min. A subject was considered to be exhausted when it was impossible for him or her to stand on the vibration device. The sets were separated by a 3 min rest period with the subjects sitting on a chair. During training the subjects of both groups maintained an upright body position, stood on their forefoot with their heels off the ground and the knee joints flexed at an angle of 10° (Fig. 1). They placed their hands on their hips, directed their head and eyes forward and distributed their weight equally on both feet with a foot-to-foot distance of 42 cm.


Whole body vibration training--improving balance control and muscle endurance.

Ritzmann R, Kramer A, Bernhardt S, Gollhofer A - PLoS ONE (2014)

Reduction in COP displacement in two representative subjects of the VIB and CON group.Centre of pressure (COP) displacement of one subject of the whole body vibration (VIB) group (A and B) and one subject of the equivalent training (CON) group (C and D) in anterior-posterior (a–p) and medio-lateral (m-l) direction before and after the training interventions. The participants of both training groups trained in an upright standing position with a knee flexion of 10° in the forefoot stance.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3935964&req=5

pone-0089905-g001: Reduction in COP displacement in two representative subjects of the VIB and CON group.Centre of pressure (COP) displacement of one subject of the whole body vibration (VIB) group (A and B) and one subject of the equivalent training (CON) group (C and D) in anterior-posterior (a–p) and medio-lateral (m-l) direction before and after the training interventions. The participants of both training groups trained in an upright standing position with a knee flexion of 10° in the forefoot stance.
Mentions: All participants trained for a period of four weeks with three training sessions per week and at least one day of rest between two sessions. All sessions were documented, surveyed, and supervised by the authors of the study. In order to separate the WBV effects from the overall adaptations due to plain intervention, the training of the CON group was matched with the training of the WBV group, i.e. training duration, number of sets, rest periods and task-specific instructions were identical for both groups (Table 1). For all subjects, one training session consisted of two sets. The duration of the first set was established at 3 min in the first week, 5 min in the second and 8 min in the third and fourth week, respectively. For the second set the subjects trained until exhaustion, however, duration was limited to 20 min. A subject was considered to be exhausted when it was impossible for him or her to stand on the vibration device. The sets were separated by a 3 min rest period with the subjects sitting on a chair. During training the subjects of both groups maintained an upright body position, stood on their forefoot with their heels off the ground and the knee joints flexed at an angle of 10° (Fig. 1). They placed their hands on their hips, directed their head and eyes forward and distributed their weight equally on both feet with a foot-to-foot distance of 42 cm.

Bottom Line: The statistical analysis revealed significant interaction effects of group×time for balance and local static muscle endurance (p<0.05).The effect on jump height remained insignificant (pre vs. post VIB +3%, p = 0.25 and CON ±0%, p = 0.82).As far as balance and muscle endurance of the lower leg are concerned, a training program that includes WBV can provide supplementary benefits in young and well-trained adults compared to an equivalent program that does not include WBV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Sport and Sport Science, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Exercise combined with whole body vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular, although additional effects of WBV in comparison to conventional exercises are still discussed controversially in literature. Heterogeneous findings are attributed to large differences in the training designs between WBV and "control" groups in regard to training volume, load and type. In order to separate the additional effects of WBV from the overall adaptations due to the intervention, in this study, a four-week WBV training setup was compared to a matched intervention program with identical training parameters in both training settings except for the exposure to WBV. In a repeated-measures matched-subject design, 38 participants were assigned to either the WBV group (VIB) or the equivalent training group (CON). Training duration, number of sets, rest periods and task-specific instructions were matched between the groups. Balance, jump height and local static muscle endurance were assessed before and after the training period. The statistical analysis revealed significant interaction effects of group×time for balance and local static muscle endurance (p<0.05). Hence, WBV caused an additional effect on balance control (pre vs. post VIB +13%, p<0.05 and CON +6%, p = 0.33) and local static muscle endurance (pre vs. post VIB +36%, p<0.05 and CON +11%, p = 0.49). The effect on jump height remained insignificant (pre vs. post VIB +3%, p = 0.25 and CON ±0%, p = 0.82). This study provides evidence for the additional effects of WBV above conventional exercise alone. As far as balance and muscle endurance of the lower leg are concerned, a training program that includes WBV can provide supplementary benefits in young and well-trained adults compared to an equivalent program that does not include WBV.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus