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Using stochastic gradient boosting to infer stopover habitat selection and distribution of Hooded Cranes Grus monacha during spring migration in Lindian, Northeast China.

Cai T, Huettmann F, Guo Y - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Our field work in 2013 using systematic ground-truthing confirmed that this prediction was accurate.Based on this study, we suggest that Lindian plays an important role for migratory birds and that cultivation practices should be adjusted locally.Furthermore, public education programs to promote the concept of the harmonious coexistence of humans and cranes can help successfully protect this species in the long term and eventually lead to its delisting by the IUCN.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Nature Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
The Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) is a globally vulnerable species, and habitat loss is the primary cause of its decline. To date, little is known regarding the specific habitat needs, and stopover habitat selection in particular, of the Hooded Crane. In this study we used stochastic gradient boosting (TreeNet) to develop three specific habitat selection models for roosting, daytime resting, and feeding site selection. In addition, we used a geographic information system (GIS) combined with TreeNet to develop a species distribution model. We also generated a digital map of the relative occurrence index (ROI) of this species at daytime resting sites in the study area. Our study indicated that the water depth, distance to village, coverage of deciduous leaves, open water area, and density of plants were the major predictors of roosting site selection. For daytime resting site selection, the distance to wetland, distance to farmland, and distance to road were the primary predictors. For feeding site selection, the distance to road, quantity of food, plant coverage, distance to village, plant density, distance to wetland, and distance to river were contributing factors, and the distance to road and quantity of food were the most important predictors. The predictive map showed that there were two consistent multi-year daytime resting sites in our study area. Our field work in 2013 using systematic ground-truthing confirmed that this prediction was accurate. Based on this study, we suggest that Lindian plays an important role for migratory birds and that cultivation practices should be adjusted locally. Furthermore, public education programs to promote the concept of the harmonious coexistence of humans and cranes can help successfully protect this species in the long term and eventually lead to its delisting by the IUCN.

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Map of Hooded Cranes distribution and migration routes.Data from The cranes: status survey and conservation action plan[9], Threatened birds of Asia[10], and field work in recent years.
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pone-0089913-g001: Map of Hooded Cranes distribution and migration routes.Data from The cranes: status survey and conservation action plan[9], Threatened birds of Asia[10], and field work in recent years.

Mentions: The Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) occurs in northeast Asia and breeds in an area spanning from eastern Siberia to the Chinese Lesser Khingan Range. Its wintering grounds are located in Izumi and Yashiro in Japan, South Korea, and the Yangtze River area in China [9], [10] (Figure 1). Only approximately 11,600 individuals remain throughout the world, and the population is declining [11]. Therefore, the Hooded Crane is recognized as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List and is listed in Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). The population status of this species does currently not warrant a delisting and requires further attention.


Using stochastic gradient boosting to infer stopover habitat selection and distribution of Hooded Cranes Grus monacha during spring migration in Lindian, Northeast China.

Cai T, Huettmann F, Guo Y - PLoS ONE (2014)

Map of Hooded Cranes distribution and migration routes.Data from The cranes: status survey and conservation action plan[9], Threatened birds of Asia[10], and field work in recent years.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3935961&req=5

pone-0089913-g001: Map of Hooded Cranes distribution and migration routes.Data from The cranes: status survey and conservation action plan[9], Threatened birds of Asia[10], and field work in recent years.
Mentions: The Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) occurs in northeast Asia and breeds in an area spanning from eastern Siberia to the Chinese Lesser Khingan Range. Its wintering grounds are located in Izumi and Yashiro in Japan, South Korea, and the Yangtze River area in China [9], [10] (Figure 1). Only approximately 11,600 individuals remain throughout the world, and the population is declining [11]. Therefore, the Hooded Crane is recognized as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List and is listed in Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). The population status of this species does currently not warrant a delisting and requires further attention.

Bottom Line: Our field work in 2013 using systematic ground-truthing confirmed that this prediction was accurate.Based on this study, we suggest that Lindian plays an important role for migratory birds and that cultivation practices should be adjusted locally.Furthermore, public education programs to promote the concept of the harmonious coexistence of humans and cranes can help successfully protect this species in the long term and eventually lead to its delisting by the IUCN.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Nature Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
The Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) is a globally vulnerable species, and habitat loss is the primary cause of its decline. To date, little is known regarding the specific habitat needs, and stopover habitat selection in particular, of the Hooded Crane. In this study we used stochastic gradient boosting (TreeNet) to develop three specific habitat selection models for roosting, daytime resting, and feeding site selection. In addition, we used a geographic information system (GIS) combined with TreeNet to develop a species distribution model. We also generated a digital map of the relative occurrence index (ROI) of this species at daytime resting sites in the study area. Our study indicated that the water depth, distance to village, coverage of deciduous leaves, open water area, and density of plants were the major predictors of roosting site selection. For daytime resting site selection, the distance to wetland, distance to farmland, and distance to road were the primary predictors. For feeding site selection, the distance to road, quantity of food, plant coverage, distance to village, plant density, distance to wetland, and distance to river were contributing factors, and the distance to road and quantity of food were the most important predictors. The predictive map showed that there were two consistent multi-year daytime resting sites in our study area. Our field work in 2013 using systematic ground-truthing confirmed that this prediction was accurate. Based on this study, we suggest that Lindian plays an important role for migratory birds and that cultivation practices should be adjusted locally. Furthermore, public education programs to promote the concept of the harmonious coexistence of humans and cranes can help successfully protect this species in the long term and eventually lead to its delisting by the IUCN.

Show MeSH