Limits...
Socio-ecological risk factors for prime-age adult death in two coastal areas of Vietnam.

Kim DR, Ali M, Thiem VD, Wierzba TF - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Hierarchical spatial models enable the geographic and ecological analysis of health data thereby providing useful information for designing effective health interventions.Our study suggests that lower education of the household head is an important predictor for prime age adult mortality.Variability in socio-ecological risk factors and in risk areas by sex make it challenging to design appropriate intervention strategies aimed at decreasing prime-age adult deaths in Vietnam.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Vaccine Institute, SNU Research Park, Nakseongdae-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hierarchical spatial models enable the geographic and ecological analysis of health data thereby providing useful information for designing effective health interventions. In this study, we used a Bayesian hierarchical spatial model to evaluate mortality data in Vietnam. The model enabled identification of socio-ecological risk factors and generation of risk maps to better understand the causes and geographic implications of prime-age (15 to less than 45 years) adult death.

Methods and findings: The study was conducted in two sites: Nha Trang and Hue in Vietnam. The study areas were split into 500×500 meter cells to define neighborhoods. We first extracted socio-demographic data from population databases of the two sites, and then aggregated the data by neighborhood. We used spatial hierarchical model that borrows strength from neighbors for evaluating risk factors and for creating spatially smoothed risk map after adjusting for neighborhood level covariates. The Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure was used to estimate the parameters. Male mortality was more than twice the female mortality. The rates also varied by age and sex. The most frequent cause of mortality was traffic accidents and drowning for men and traffic accidents and suicide for women. Lower education of household heads in the neighborhood was an important risk factor for increased mortality. The mortality was highly variable in space and the socio-ecological risk factors are sensitive to study site and sex.

Conclusion: Our study suggests that lower education of the household head is an important predictor for prime age adult mortality. Variability in socio-ecological risk factors and in risk areas by sex make it challenging to design appropriate intervention strategies aimed at decreasing prime-age adult deaths in Vietnam.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Spatial variation of risk for prime-age adult men and women mortality in a covariate model, Nha Trang, Vietnam, 2001-2002.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3935940&req=5

pone-0089780-g003: Spatial variation of risk for prime-age adult men and women mortality in a covariate model, Nha Trang, Vietnam, 2001-2002.

Mentions: The SSRR for mortality derived from the covariate model, classified in four groups at 0.50 intervals of risk for better interpretation of data, are shown in figures 3 and 4. The SSRR for mortality derived from the model yielded several risk neighborhoods characterized by: a lower percentage of male household heads in the community, a greater percentage using unsafe water for drinking, a lower number of literate households in the community, living in close proximity to a river, and living far from health care center.


Socio-ecological risk factors for prime-age adult death in two coastal areas of Vietnam.

Kim DR, Ali M, Thiem VD, Wierzba TF - PLoS ONE (2014)

Spatial variation of risk for prime-age adult men and women mortality in a covariate model, Nha Trang, Vietnam, 2001-2002.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3935940&req=5

pone-0089780-g003: Spatial variation of risk for prime-age adult men and women mortality in a covariate model, Nha Trang, Vietnam, 2001-2002.
Mentions: The SSRR for mortality derived from the covariate model, classified in four groups at 0.50 intervals of risk for better interpretation of data, are shown in figures 3 and 4. The SSRR for mortality derived from the model yielded several risk neighborhoods characterized by: a lower percentage of male household heads in the community, a greater percentage using unsafe water for drinking, a lower number of literate households in the community, living in close proximity to a river, and living far from health care center.

Bottom Line: Hierarchical spatial models enable the geographic and ecological analysis of health data thereby providing useful information for designing effective health interventions.Our study suggests that lower education of the household head is an important predictor for prime age adult mortality.Variability in socio-ecological risk factors and in risk areas by sex make it challenging to design appropriate intervention strategies aimed at decreasing prime-age adult deaths in Vietnam.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Vaccine Institute, SNU Research Park, Nakseongdae-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hierarchical spatial models enable the geographic and ecological analysis of health data thereby providing useful information for designing effective health interventions. In this study, we used a Bayesian hierarchical spatial model to evaluate mortality data in Vietnam. The model enabled identification of socio-ecological risk factors and generation of risk maps to better understand the causes and geographic implications of prime-age (15 to less than 45 years) adult death.

Methods and findings: The study was conducted in two sites: Nha Trang and Hue in Vietnam. The study areas were split into 500×500 meter cells to define neighborhoods. We first extracted socio-demographic data from population databases of the two sites, and then aggregated the data by neighborhood. We used spatial hierarchical model that borrows strength from neighbors for evaluating risk factors and for creating spatially smoothed risk map after adjusting for neighborhood level covariates. The Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure was used to estimate the parameters. Male mortality was more than twice the female mortality. The rates also varied by age and sex. The most frequent cause of mortality was traffic accidents and drowning for men and traffic accidents and suicide for women. Lower education of household heads in the neighborhood was an important risk factor for increased mortality. The mortality was highly variable in space and the socio-ecological risk factors are sensitive to study site and sex.

Conclusion: Our study suggests that lower education of the household head is an important predictor for prime age adult mortality. Variability in socio-ecological risk factors and in risk areas by sex make it challenging to design appropriate intervention strategies aimed at decreasing prime-age adult deaths in Vietnam.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus