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Stafne's bone cavity: An unusual case with involvement of the buccal and lingual mandibular plates.

Herranz-Aparicio J, Figueiredo R, Gay-Escoda C - J Clin Exp Dent (2014)

Bottom Line: An additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was made to discard submandibular gland pathology and to confirm the diagnosis.Since SC is asymptomatic and nonprogressive, a conservative approach based in clinical and radiological follow-ups was considered to be the most suitable treatment option.Key words:Stafne bone cavity, lingual mandibular bone defect, case report.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DDS. Fellow of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology. School of Dentistry. University of Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Lingual mandibular bone defects, also known as Stafne bone cavity (SC), are unilateral asymptomatic radiolucencies, generally seen in the mandibular angle, below the inferior alveolar canal. Although panoramic radiographies normally offer enough information to make a correct diagnosis, additional studies are often required, especially in atypical cases. The present report describes an atypical presentation of a Stafne's bone cavity in a 78 years-old male patient. In this particular case, an asymptomatic and radiolucid lesion was observed during a routine dental examination. The computed tomography (CT) showed an involvement of both lingual and buccal mandibular plates producing a tunnel-like lesion. No history of mandibular trauma or surgery was refered. An additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was made to discard submandibular gland pathology and to confirm the diagnosis. Since SC is asymptomatic and nonprogressive, a conservative approach based in clinical and radiological follow-ups was considered to be the most suitable treatment option. Key words:Stafne bone cavity, lingual mandibular bone defect, case report.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Axial section of CT scan at one year follow-up. No changes are observed with respect to the previous CT.
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Figure 2: Axial section of CT scan at one year follow-up. No changes are observed with respect to the previous CT.

Mentions: Although both mandibular plates were affected, a diagnosis of SC was made and no further therapy was institu-ted. A new CT was made one year after the initial diagnosis and no changes regarding the size and features of the lesion were observed (Fig. 2).


Stafne's bone cavity: An unusual case with involvement of the buccal and lingual mandibular plates.

Herranz-Aparicio J, Figueiredo R, Gay-Escoda C - J Clin Exp Dent (2014)

Axial section of CT scan at one year follow-up. No changes are observed with respect to the previous CT.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3935913&req=5

Figure 2: Axial section of CT scan at one year follow-up. No changes are observed with respect to the previous CT.
Mentions: Although both mandibular plates were affected, a diagnosis of SC was made and no further therapy was institu-ted. A new CT was made one year after the initial diagnosis and no changes regarding the size and features of the lesion were observed (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: An additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was made to discard submandibular gland pathology and to confirm the diagnosis.Since SC is asymptomatic and nonprogressive, a conservative approach based in clinical and radiological follow-ups was considered to be the most suitable treatment option.Key words:Stafne bone cavity, lingual mandibular bone defect, case report.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DDS. Fellow of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology. School of Dentistry. University of Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Lingual mandibular bone defects, also known as Stafne bone cavity (SC), are unilateral asymptomatic radiolucencies, generally seen in the mandibular angle, below the inferior alveolar canal. Although panoramic radiographies normally offer enough information to make a correct diagnosis, additional studies are often required, especially in atypical cases. The present report describes an atypical presentation of a Stafne's bone cavity in a 78 years-old male patient. In this particular case, an asymptomatic and radiolucid lesion was observed during a routine dental examination. The computed tomography (CT) showed an involvement of both lingual and buccal mandibular plates producing a tunnel-like lesion. No history of mandibular trauma or surgery was refered. An additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was made to discard submandibular gland pathology and to confirm the diagnosis. Since SC is asymptomatic and nonprogressive, a conservative approach based in clinical and radiological follow-ups was considered to be the most suitable treatment option. Key words:Stafne bone cavity, lingual mandibular bone defect, case report.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus