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Dermal substitutes support the growth of human skin-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: potential tool for skin regeneration.

Jeremias Tda S, Machado RG, Visoni SB, Pereima MJ, Leonardi DF, Trentin AG - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: New strategies for skin regeneration are needed in order to provide effective treatment for cutaneous wounds and disease.When cultured in monolayers, SD-MSCs expressed mesenchymal markers, such as CD105, Fibronectin, and α-SMA; and neural markers, such as Nestin and βIII-Tubulin; at transcriptional and/or protein level.Therefore, dermal substitutes support the growth of mesenchymal stromal cells from human skin, promising an effective tool for tissue engineering and regenerative technology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genética, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brasil.

ABSTRACT
New strategies for skin regeneration are needed in order to provide effective treatment for cutaneous wounds and disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because of their prolonged self-renewal capacity, multipotentiality, and ability to release active molecules important for tissue repair. In this paper, we show that human skin-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (SD-MSCs) display similar characteristics to the multipotent MSCs. We also evaluate their growth in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system with dermal substitutes (Integra and Pelnac). When cultured in monolayers, SD-MSCs expressed mesenchymal markers, such as CD105, Fibronectin, and α-SMA; and neural markers, such as Nestin and βIII-Tubulin; at transcriptional and/or protein level. Integra and Pelnac equally supported the adhesion, spread and growth of human SD-MSCs in 3D culture, maintaining the MSC characteristics and the expression of multilineage markers. Therefore, dermal substitutes support the growth of mesenchymal stromal cells from human skin, promising an effective tool for tissue engineering and regenerative technology.

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Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of SD-MSCs cultured in (A–D) Integra and (E–H) Pelnac.(A) Cross-sectional view of Integra dermal substitute alone showing the silicone (*) and the inner layer. (B–D) 3D culture of SD-MSCs in Integra 48 hours after seeding. (E) Surface and (F) cross-sectional views of Pelnac showing the collagen layer. (G–H) 3D culture of SD-MSCs in Pelnac 48 hours after seeding. Insets in B: different magnifications of a SD-MSC.
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pone-0089542-g004: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of SD-MSCs cultured in (A–D) Integra and (E–H) Pelnac.(A) Cross-sectional view of Integra dermal substitute alone showing the silicone (*) and the inner layer. (B–D) 3D culture of SD-MSCs in Integra 48 hours after seeding. (E) Surface and (F) cross-sectional views of Pelnac showing the collagen layer. (G–H) 3D culture of SD-MSCs in Pelnac 48 hours after seeding. Insets in B: different magnifications of a SD-MSC.

Mentions: Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that SD-MSCs adhere and migrate within both Integra (Figure 3A–D) and Pelnac (Figure 3 E–H) matrices, although mostly distributed in the upper portion (Figure S1). The structure and porosity of Integra (Figure 4A) and Pelnac (Figure 4E–F) inner layers were shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM analysis also revealed that SD-MSCs similarly attached and spread at both dermal matrices with the fibroblast-like fusiform morphology (Figure 4B-D and G-H for Integra and Pelnac, respectively). Together with MTS assay, these findings indicate that both dermal substitutes equally support the adhesion, spread and growth of SD-MSCs in vitro.


Dermal substitutes support the growth of human skin-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: potential tool for skin regeneration.

Jeremias Tda S, Machado RG, Visoni SB, Pereima MJ, Leonardi DF, Trentin AG - PLoS ONE (2014)

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of SD-MSCs cultured in (A–D) Integra and (E–H) Pelnac.(A) Cross-sectional view of Integra dermal substitute alone showing the silicone (*) and the inner layer. (B–D) 3D culture of SD-MSCs in Integra 48 hours after seeding. (E) Surface and (F) cross-sectional views of Pelnac showing the collagen layer. (G–H) 3D culture of SD-MSCs in Pelnac 48 hours after seeding. Insets in B: different magnifications of a SD-MSC.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3935879&req=5

pone-0089542-g004: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of SD-MSCs cultured in (A–D) Integra and (E–H) Pelnac.(A) Cross-sectional view of Integra dermal substitute alone showing the silicone (*) and the inner layer. (B–D) 3D culture of SD-MSCs in Integra 48 hours after seeding. (E) Surface and (F) cross-sectional views of Pelnac showing the collagen layer. (G–H) 3D culture of SD-MSCs in Pelnac 48 hours after seeding. Insets in B: different magnifications of a SD-MSC.
Mentions: Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that SD-MSCs adhere and migrate within both Integra (Figure 3A–D) and Pelnac (Figure 3 E–H) matrices, although mostly distributed in the upper portion (Figure S1). The structure and porosity of Integra (Figure 4A) and Pelnac (Figure 4E–F) inner layers were shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM analysis also revealed that SD-MSCs similarly attached and spread at both dermal matrices with the fibroblast-like fusiform morphology (Figure 4B-D and G-H for Integra and Pelnac, respectively). Together with MTS assay, these findings indicate that both dermal substitutes equally support the adhesion, spread and growth of SD-MSCs in vitro.

Bottom Line: New strategies for skin regeneration are needed in order to provide effective treatment for cutaneous wounds and disease.When cultured in monolayers, SD-MSCs expressed mesenchymal markers, such as CD105, Fibronectin, and α-SMA; and neural markers, such as Nestin and βIII-Tubulin; at transcriptional and/or protein level.Therefore, dermal substitutes support the growth of mesenchymal stromal cells from human skin, promising an effective tool for tissue engineering and regenerative technology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genética, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brasil.

ABSTRACT
New strategies for skin regeneration are needed in order to provide effective treatment for cutaneous wounds and disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because of their prolonged self-renewal capacity, multipotentiality, and ability to release active molecules important for tissue repair. In this paper, we show that human skin-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (SD-MSCs) display similar characteristics to the multipotent MSCs. We also evaluate their growth in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system with dermal substitutes (Integra and Pelnac). When cultured in monolayers, SD-MSCs expressed mesenchymal markers, such as CD105, Fibronectin, and α-SMA; and neural markers, such as Nestin and βIII-Tubulin; at transcriptional and/or protein level. Integra and Pelnac equally supported the adhesion, spread and growth of human SD-MSCs in 3D culture, maintaining the MSC characteristics and the expression of multilineage markers. Therefore, dermal substitutes support the growth of mesenchymal stromal cells from human skin, promising an effective tool for tissue engineering and regenerative technology.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus