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Gastrointestinal endometriosis causing subacute intestinal obstruction with gradual development of weight loss and misdiagnosed as irritable bowel syndrome.

Soumekh A, Nagler J - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2014)

Bottom Line: Both endometriosis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are commonly found in young women and the diagnosis of either is challenging.Alarm symptoms can exclude the diagnosis of IBS, but their onset may be insidious and often no evidence of organic disease may be found.This case illustrates the need for constant vigilance in patients with IBS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, N.Y., USA.

ABSTRACT
Both endometriosis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are commonly found in young women and the diagnosis of either is challenging. Alarm symptoms can exclude the diagnosis of IBS, but their onset may be insidious and often no evidence of organic disease may be found. We present a patient with a 4-year history of presumed IBS, absent gynecological symptoms, negative gastrointestinal as well as gynecological testing who developed the only alarm symptom of weight loss and was eventually found to have endometriosis of the small intestine. This case illustrates the need for constant vigilance in patients with IBS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histology of the surgical specimen showed focal submucosal hemorrhage and serosal scarring.
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Figure 3: Histology of the surgical specimen showed focal submucosal hemorrhage and serosal scarring.

Mentions: On the basis of her symptoms and negative diagnostic work-up, the diagnoses of IBS, gastroesophageal reflux and lactose intolerance were made. Treatment with antacids and an anti-cholinergic did not provide relief. Due to her recurrent symptoms, a Computed tomography enterography examination was performed to evaluate the small intestine. This revealed a partial small bowel obstruction located approximately 5 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve (fig. 1). Subsequent surgical resection and histology identified the cause of the partial obstruction to be endometriosis with focal submucosal hemorrhage and serosal scarring (fig. 2, fig. 3). The patient became totally asymptomatic postoperatively.


Gastrointestinal endometriosis causing subacute intestinal obstruction with gradual development of weight loss and misdiagnosed as irritable bowel syndrome.

Soumekh A, Nagler J - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2014)

Histology of the surgical specimen showed focal submucosal hemorrhage and serosal scarring.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3934607&req=5

Figure 3: Histology of the surgical specimen showed focal submucosal hemorrhage and serosal scarring.
Mentions: On the basis of her symptoms and negative diagnostic work-up, the diagnoses of IBS, gastroesophageal reflux and lactose intolerance were made. Treatment with antacids and an anti-cholinergic did not provide relief. Due to her recurrent symptoms, a Computed tomography enterography examination was performed to evaluate the small intestine. This revealed a partial small bowel obstruction located approximately 5 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve (fig. 1). Subsequent surgical resection and histology identified the cause of the partial obstruction to be endometriosis with focal submucosal hemorrhage and serosal scarring (fig. 2, fig. 3). The patient became totally asymptomatic postoperatively.

Bottom Line: Both endometriosis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are commonly found in young women and the diagnosis of either is challenging.Alarm symptoms can exclude the diagnosis of IBS, but their onset may be insidious and often no evidence of organic disease may be found.This case illustrates the need for constant vigilance in patients with IBS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, N.Y., USA.

ABSTRACT
Both endometriosis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are commonly found in young women and the diagnosis of either is challenging. Alarm symptoms can exclude the diagnosis of IBS, but their onset may be insidious and often no evidence of organic disease may be found. We present a patient with a 4-year history of presumed IBS, absent gynecological symptoms, negative gastrointestinal as well as gynecological testing who developed the only alarm symptom of weight loss and was eventually found to have endometriosis of the small intestine. This case illustrates the need for constant vigilance in patients with IBS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus