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A systematic review of self-management interventions for children and youth with physical disabilities.

Lindsay S, Kingsnorth S, Mcdougall C, Keating H - Disabil Rehabil (2013)

Bottom Line: Evidence shows that effective self-management behaviors have the potential to improve health outcomes, quality of life, self-efficacy and reduce morbidity, emergency visits and costs of care.Although outcomes varied between the studies, all of the interventions reported at least one significant improvement in either overall self-management skills or a specific health behavior.Implications for Rehabilitation There is some evidence to suggest that self-management interventions for children and youth with spina bifida and arthritis can improve self-management behaviors and health outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital , Toronto, ON , Canada .

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Evidence shows that effective self-management behaviors have the potential to improve health outcomes, quality of life, self-efficacy and reduce morbidity, emergency visits and costs of care. A better understanding of self-management interventions (i.e. programs that help with managing symptoms, treatment, physical and psychological consequences) is needed to achieve a positive impact on health because most children with a disability now live well into adulthood.

Method: A systematic review of self-management interventions for school age youth with physical disabilities was undertaken to assess their effectiveness. Comprehensive electronic searches using international web-based reference libraries were conducted for peer-reviewed and gray literature published between 1980 and January 2012. Eligible studies examined the effectiveness of self-management interventions for children and youth between 6 and 18 years of age with congenital or acquired physical disabilities. Studies needed to include a comparison group (e.g. single group pre/post-test design) and at least one quantifiable health-related outcome.

Results: Of the 2184 studies identified, six met the inclusion criteria; two involved youth with spina bifida and four with juvenile arthritis. The majority of the interventions ran several sessions for at least 3 months by a trained interventionist or clinician, had one-to-one sessions and meetings, homework activities and parental involvement. Although outcomes varied between the studies, all of the interventions reported at least one significant improvement in either overall self-management skills or a specific health behavior.

Conclusions: While self-management interventions have the potential to improve health behaviors, there were relatively few rigorously designed studies identified. More studies are needed to document the outcomes of self-management interventions, especially their most effective characteristics for children and youth with physical disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation There is some evidence to suggest that self-management interventions for children and youth with spina bifida and arthritis can improve self-management behaviors and health outcomes. Parents' involvement should be considered in encouraging self-management behaviors at different stages of their child's development. Much work is needed to explore the longer term implications of self-management interventions for youth with physical disabilities as well as the impact on health care utilization.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow of studies through the systematic review process.
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f1: Flow of studies through the systematic review process.

Mentions: Retrieved records were imported into RefWorks©. The search process identified 2184 studies whereby two people independently reviewed the titles and abstracts of these articles (Figure 1). Most of the articles (2097) were eliminated based on title or abstract not being related to the search. Seventy-three potentially relevant studies were independently reviewed in full by two investigators (the first author and a research assistant). After applying the inclusion criteria and removing the duplicates, 14 remained, which were read by four members of the research team. After careful consideration of the inclusion criteria and discussion amongst the research team, six articles remained in the final analysis.Figure 1.


A systematic review of self-management interventions for children and youth with physical disabilities.

Lindsay S, Kingsnorth S, Mcdougall C, Keating H - Disabil Rehabil (2013)

Flow of studies through the systematic review process.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3934376&req=5

f1: Flow of studies through the systematic review process.
Mentions: Retrieved records were imported into RefWorks©. The search process identified 2184 studies whereby two people independently reviewed the titles and abstracts of these articles (Figure 1). Most of the articles (2097) were eliminated based on title or abstract not being related to the search. Seventy-three potentially relevant studies were independently reviewed in full by two investigators (the first author and a research assistant). After applying the inclusion criteria and removing the duplicates, 14 remained, which were read by four members of the research team. After careful consideration of the inclusion criteria and discussion amongst the research team, six articles remained in the final analysis.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Evidence shows that effective self-management behaviors have the potential to improve health outcomes, quality of life, self-efficacy and reduce morbidity, emergency visits and costs of care.Although outcomes varied between the studies, all of the interventions reported at least one significant improvement in either overall self-management skills or a specific health behavior.Implications for Rehabilitation There is some evidence to suggest that self-management interventions for children and youth with spina bifida and arthritis can improve self-management behaviors and health outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital , Toronto, ON , Canada .

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Evidence shows that effective self-management behaviors have the potential to improve health outcomes, quality of life, self-efficacy and reduce morbidity, emergency visits and costs of care. A better understanding of self-management interventions (i.e. programs that help with managing symptoms, treatment, physical and psychological consequences) is needed to achieve a positive impact on health because most children with a disability now live well into adulthood.

Method: A systematic review of self-management interventions for school age youth with physical disabilities was undertaken to assess their effectiveness. Comprehensive electronic searches using international web-based reference libraries were conducted for peer-reviewed and gray literature published between 1980 and January 2012. Eligible studies examined the effectiveness of self-management interventions for children and youth between 6 and 18 years of age with congenital or acquired physical disabilities. Studies needed to include a comparison group (e.g. single group pre/post-test design) and at least one quantifiable health-related outcome.

Results: Of the 2184 studies identified, six met the inclusion criteria; two involved youth with spina bifida and four with juvenile arthritis. The majority of the interventions ran several sessions for at least 3 months by a trained interventionist or clinician, had one-to-one sessions and meetings, homework activities and parental involvement. Although outcomes varied between the studies, all of the interventions reported at least one significant improvement in either overall self-management skills or a specific health behavior.

Conclusions: While self-management interventions have the potential to improve health behaviors, there were relatively few rigorously designed studies identified. More studies are needed to document the outcomes of self-management interventions, especially their most effective characteristics for children and youth with physical disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation There is some evidence to suggest that self-management interventions for children and youth with spina bifida and arthritis can improve self-management behaviors and health outcomes. Parents' involvement should be considered in encouraging self-management behaviors at different stages of their child's development. Much work is needed to explore the longer term implications of self-management interventions for youth with physical disabilities as well as the impact on health care utilization.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus