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Concurrent sensorimotor temporal recalibration to different lags for the left and right hand.

Sugano Y, Keetels M, Vroomen J - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: Different amounts of TR were found when the left and right hand were concurrently exposed to the same versus different delays.With different exposure- delays for the two hands, there was a TR even for the hand that did not experience any delay in the feedback signal.These results suggest the existence of cross-talk between the hands, where both central and motor-specific components might be involved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Industrial Management, Kyushu Sangyo University Fukuoka, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Perception of temporal synchrony between one's own action and the sensory feedback of that action is quite flexible. We examined whether sensorimotor temporal recalibration (TR) involves central or motor-specific components by concurrently exposing the left and right hands to different lags. The experiment was composed of a pre-test, an adaptation phase, and a post-test. During the adaptation phase, participants tapped their left and right index fingers in alternating fashion while each tap induced an auditory feedback signal (a short click sound). One hand was exposed to a long delay between the tap and the sound (~150 ms), while the other hand was exposed to a subjective no-delay (~50 ms). Before and after the adaptation phase (the pre- and post-test), participants tried to tap in synchrony with pacer tones (ISI = 1000 ms). The results showed that the hand that was exposed to the delayed sound corrected for this delay by tapping earlier (a larger anticipation error) than the no-delay hand, indicating TR. Different amounts of TR were found when the left and right hand were concurrently exposed to the same versus different delays. With different exposure- delays for the two hands, there was a TR even for the hand that did not experience any delay in the feedback signal. However, it is not the case with the same exposure delay for the two hands. TR of the hand that experienced delayed feedback also occurred faster and was more complete (~40% greater than that of the hand with no subjective delay) if the two hands were exposed to the same rather than different delays (~20% greater than that of the hand with no subjective delay). These results suggest the existence of cross-talk between the hands, where both central and motor-specific components might be involved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean tap asynchronies per trial-block. (A) The mixed-exposure condition. (B) The pure-exposure condition. One trial-block contains two consecutive trials. A negative tap-asynchrony means that the tap comes before the tone (i.e., an anticipation error). Error bars represent 1 standard error of mean (SEM). An exponential decay function, P2 +(P0 - P2 ) × exp (-P1 × x), was fitted to the mean tap asynchronies over the trial-blocks. The meaning of each parameter was explained in the text. The fitted lines are shown in solid lines.
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Figure 3: Mean tap asynchronies per trial-block. (A) The mixed-exposure condition. (B) The pure-exposure condition. One trial-block contains two consecutive trials. A negative tap-asynchrony means that the tap comes before the tone (i.e., an anticipation error). Error bars represent 1 standard error of mean (SEM). An exponential decay function, P2 +(P0 - P2 ) × exp (-P1 × x), was fitted to the mean tap asynchronies over the trial-blocks. The meaning of each parameter was explained in the text. The fitted lines are shown in solid lines.

Mentions: Secondary analyses were performed to examine the build-up of the TRE. To examine this, we divided the 20 trials of each condition into 10 blocks of two trials each. The mean tap asynchronies per block are shown in Figure 3.


Concurrent sensorimotor temporal recalibration to different lags for the left and right hand.

Sugano Y, Keetels M, Vroomen J - Front Psychol (2014)

Mean tap asynchronies per trial-block. (A) The mixed-exposure condition. (B) The pure-exposure condition. One trial-block contains two consecutive trials. A negative tap-asynchrony means that the tap comes before the tone (i.e., an anticipation error). Error bars represent 1 standard error of mean (SEM). An exponential decay function, P2 +(P0 - P2 ) × exp (-P1 × x), was fitted to the mean tap asynchronies over the trial-blocks. The meaning of each parameter was explained in the text. The fitted lines are shown in solid lines.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3934310&req=5

Figure 3: Mean tap asynchronies per trial-block. (A) The mixed-exposure condition. (B) The pure-exposure condition. One trial-block contains two consecutive trials. A negative tap-asynchrony means that the tap comes before the tone (i.e., an anticipation error). Error bars represent 1 standard error of mean (SEM). An exponential decay function, P2 +(P0 - P2 ) × exp (-P1 × x), was fitted to the mean tap asynchronies over the trial-blocks. The meaning of each parameter was explained in the text. The fitted lines are shown in solid lines.
Mentions: Secondary analyses were performed to examine the build-up of the TRE. To examine this, we divided the 20 trials of each condition into 10 blocks of two trials each. The mean tap asynchronies per block are shown in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: Different amounts of TR were found when the left and right hand were concurrently exposed to the same versus different delays.With different exposure- delays for the two hands, there was a TR even for the hand that did not experience any delay in the feedback signal.These results suggest the existence of cross-talk between the hands, where both central and motor-specific components might be involved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Industrial Management, Kyushu Sangyo University Fukuoka, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Perception of temporal synchrony between one's own action and the sensory feedback of that action is quite flexible. We examined whether sensorimotor temporal recalibration (TR) involves central or motor-specific components by concurrently exposing the left and right hands to different lags. The experiment was composed of a pre-test, an adaptation phase, and a post-test. During the adaptation phase, participants tapped their left and right index fingers in alternating fashion while each tap induced an auditory feedback signal (a short click sound). One hand was exposed to a long delay between the tap and the sound (~150 ms), while the other hand was exposed to a subjective no-delay (~50 ms). Before and after the adaptation phase (the pre- and post-test), participants tried to tap in synchrony with pacer tones (ISI = 1000 ms). The results showed that the hand that was exposed to the delayed sound corrected for this delay by tapping earlier (a larger anticipation error) than the no-delay hand, indicating TR. Different amounts of TR were found when the left and right hand were concurrently exposed to the same versus different delays. With different exposure- delays for the two hands, there was a TR even for the hand that did not experience any delay in the feedback signal. However, it is not the case with the same exposure delay for the two hands. TR of the hand that experienced delayed feedback also occurred faster and was more complete (~40% greater than that of the hand with no subjective delay) if the two hands were exposed to the same rather than different delays (~20% greater than that of the hand with no subjective delay). These results suggest the existence of cross-talk between the hands, where both central and motor-specific components might be involved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus