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Novel paint design based on nanopowder to protection against X and gamma rays.

Movahedi MM, Abdi A, Mehdizadeh A, Dehghan N, Heidari E, Masumi Y, Abbaszadeh M - Indian J Nucl Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The lead used is heavy, lacks durability, is difficult to launder, and its disposal is associated with environmental hazards.The MCNP simulation and experimental measurements for HVL (Half-Value Layer) values of this shield at 100 kVp were 0.25 and 0.23 mm, respectively.The results showed the cost-effective lead-free paint can be a great power in absorbing the X-rays and gamma rays and it can be used instead of lead.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Lead-based shields are the standard method of intraoperative radiation protection in the radiology and nuclear medicine department. Human lead toxicity is well documented. The lead used is heavy, lacks durability, is difficult to launder, and its disposal is associated with environmental hazards. The aim of this study was to design a lead free paint for protection against X and gamma rays.

Materials and methods: In this pilot st we evaluated several types of nano metal powder that seemed to have good absorption. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, was used to model the attenuation of X-ray photons in paints with different designs. Experimental measurements were carried out to assess the attenuation properties of each paint design.

Results: Among the different nano metal powder, nano tungsten trioxide and nano tin dioxide were the two most appropriate candidates for making paint in diagnostic photon energy range. Nano tungsten trioxide (15%) and nano tin dioxide (85%) provided the best protection in both simulation and experiments. After this step, attempts were made to produce appropriate nano tungsten trioxide-nano tin dioxide paints. The density of this nano tungsten trioxide-nano tin dioxide paint was 4.2 g/cm(3). The MCNP simulation and experimental measurements for HVL (Half-Value Layer) values of this shield at 100 kVp were 0.25 and 0.23 mm, respectively.

Conclusions: The results showed the cost-effective lead-free paint can be a great power in absorbing the X-rays and gamma rays and it can be used instead of lead.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The Wellhöfer DOSE-1 electrometer used in study
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Figure 2: The Wellhöfer DOSE-1 electrometer used in study

Mentions: In the next step, different nano metal powders were dispersed in epoxy paints to assess their attenuation properties. In this regard, the attenuation of poly-energetic X-rays emitted by a diagnostic CPI (CMP200 with Varian tube) X-ray machine was measured under good geometry conditions. Dose rates were measured using a Farmer type ion chamber (Wellhöfer, Model FC65-G, made in USA. Ngas/(NxAIon) (cGy/R): 0.854, Sensitive volume: 0.65 cm3, Sensitivity (nom.): 0.21 nC/cGy) and a Wellhöfer DOSE-1 electrometer [Figures 1 and 2].


Novel paint design based on nanopowder to protection against X and gamma rays.

Movahedi MM, Abdi A, Mehdizadeh A, Dehghan N, Heidari E, Masumi Y, Abbaszadeh M - Indian J Nucl Med (2014)

The Wellhöfer DOSE-1 electrometer used in study
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928744&req=5

Figure 2: The Wellhöfer DOSE-1 electrometer used in study
Mentions: In the next step, different nano metal powders were dispersed in epoxy paints to assess their attenuation properties. In this regard, the attenuation of poly-energetic X-rays emitted by a diagnostic CPI (CMP200 with Varian tube) X-ray machine was measured under good geometry conditions. Dose rates were measured using a Farmer type ion chamber (Wellhöfer, Model FC65-G, made in USA. Ngas/(NxAIon) (cGy/R): 0.854, Sensitive volume: 0.65 cm3, Sensitivity (nom.): 0.21 nC/cGy) and a Wellhöfer DOSE-1 electrometer [Figures 1 and 2].

Bottom Line: The lead used is heavy, lacks durability, is difficult to launder, and its disposal is associated with environmental hazards.The MCNP simulation and experimental measurements for HVL (Half-Value Layer) values of this shield at 100 kVp were 0.25 and 0.23 mm, respectively.The results showed the cost-effective lead-free paint can be a great power in absorbing the X-rays and gamma rays and it can be used instead of lead.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Lead-based shields are the standard method of intraoperative radiation protection in the radiology and nuclear medicine department. Human lead toxicity is well documented. The lead used is heavy, lacks durability, is difficult to launder, and its disposal is associated with environmental hazards. The aim of this study was to design a lead free paint for protection against X and gamma rays.

Materials and methods: In this pilot st we evaluated several types of nano metal powder that seemed to have good absorption. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, was used to model the attenuation of X-ray photons in paints with different designs. Experimental measurements were carried out to assess the attenuation properties of each paint design.

Results: Among the different nano metal powder, nano tungsten trioxide and nano tin dioxide were the two most appropriate candidates for making paint in diagnostic photon energy range. Nano tungsten trioxide (15%) and nano tin dioxide (85%) provided the best protection in both simulation and experiments. After this step, attempts were made to produce appropriate nano tungsten trioxide-nano tin dioxide paints. The density of this nano tungsten trioxide-nano tin dioxide paint was 4.2 g/cm(3). The MCNP simulation and experimental measurements for HVL (Half-Value Layer) values of this shield at 100 kVp were 0.25 and 0.23 mm, respectively.

Conclusions: The results showed the cost-effective lead-free paint can be a great power in absorbing the X-rays and gamma rays and it can be used instead of lead.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus