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Design and preliminary evaluation of the FINGER rehabilitation robot: controlling challenge and quantifying finger individuation during musical computer game play.

Taheri H, Rowe JB, Gardner D, Chan V, Gray K, Bower C, Reinkensmeyer DJ, Wolbrecht ET - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2014)

Bottom Line: The resulting robotic device was built to accommodate multiple finger sizes and finger-to-finger widths.We also used FINGER to measure subjects' effort and finger individuation while playing the game.Test results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to motivate subjects with an engaging game environment that challenges individuated control of the fingers, automatically control assistance levels, and quantify finger individuation after stroke.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, USA. htaheri@uidaho.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot), a device for assisting in finger rehabilitation after neurologic injury. We developed FINGER to assist stroke patients in moving their fingers individually in a naturalistic curling motion while playing a game similar to Guitar Hero. The goal was to make FINGER capable of assisting with motions where precise timing is important.

Methods: FINGER consists of a pair of stacked single degree-of-freedom 8-bar mechanisms, one for the index and one for the middle finger. Each 8-bar mechanism was designed to control the angle and position of the proximal phalanx and the position of the middle phalanx. Target positions for the mechanism optimization were determined from trajectory data collected from 7 healthy subjects using color-based motion capture. The resulting robotic device was built to accommodate multiple finger sizes and finger-to-finger widths. For initial evaluation, we asked individuals with a stroke (n = 16) and without impairment (n = 4) to play a game similar to Guitar Hero while connected to FINGER.

Results: Precision design, low friction bearings, and separate high speed linear actuators allowed FINGER to individually actuate the fingers with a high bandwidth of control (-3 dB at approximately 8 Hz). During the tests, we were able to modulate the subject's success rate at the game by automatically adjusting the controller gains of FINGER. We also used FINGER to measure subjects' effort and finger individuation while playing the game.

Conclusions: Test results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to motivate subjects with an engaging game environment that challenges individuated control of the fingers, automatically control assistance levels, and quantify finger individuation after stroke.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Average and standard deviation of effort versus average actual success rates for three groups of highly impaired, moderately impaired and unimpaired subjects.  Effort was quantified as the peak force subjects generated during blocked notes. This peak force was then normalized to each patient’s maximum force generated during isometric test.
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Figure 14: Average and standard deviation of effort versus average actual success rates for three groups of highly impaired, moderately impaired and unimpaired subjects. Effort was quantified as the peak force subjects generated during blocked notes. This peak force was then normalized to each patient’s maximum force generated during isometric test.

Mentions: We also measured how success rate and impairment level affected the subjects’ effort while playing the game. Success rate was found to have a significant effect on subjects’ effort (p = 0.0024, degrees of freedom = 2). The effects of impairment level on effort, approached but did not achieve significance (p =0.0785, degrees of freedom = 2). As shown in Figure 14, effort decreased when subjects’ success rate increased.


Design and preliminary evaluation of the FINGER rehabilitation robot: controlling challenge and quantifying finger individuation during musical computer game play.

Taheri H, Rowe JB, Gardner D, Chan V, Gray K, Bower C, Reinkensmeyer DJ, Wolbrecht ET - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2014)

Average and standard deviation of effort versus average actual success rates for three groups of highly impaired, moderately impaired and unimpaired subjects.  Effort was quantified as the peak force subjects generated during blocked notes. This peak force was then normalized to each patient’s maximum force generated during isometric test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928667&req=5

Figure 14: Average and standard deviation of effort versus average actual success rates for three groups of highly impaired, moderately impaired and unimpaired subjects. Effort was quantified as the peak force subjects generated during blocked notes. This peak force was then normalized to each patient’s maximum force generated during isometric test.
Mentions: We also measured how success rate and impairment level affected the subjects’ effort while playing the game. Success rate was found to have a significant effect on subjects’ effort (p = 0.0024, degrees of freedom = 2). The effects of impairment level on effort, approached but did not achieve significance (p =0.0785, degrees of freedom = 2). As shown in Figure 14, effort decreased when subjects’ success rate increased.

Bottom Line: The resulting robotic device was built to accommodate multiple finger sizes and finger-to-finger widths.We also used FINGER to measure subjects' effort and finger individuation while playing the game.Test results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to motivate subjects with an engaging game environment that challenges individuated control of the fingers, automatically control assistance levels, and quantify finger individuation after stroke.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, USA. htaheri@uidaho.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot), a device for assisting in finger rehabilitation after neurologic injury. We developed FINGER to assist stroke patients in moving their fingers individually in a naturalistic curling motion while playing a game similar to Guitar Hero. The goal was to make FINGER capable of assisting with motions where precise timing is important.

Methods: FINGER consists of a pair of stacked single degree-of-freedom 8-bar mechanisms, one for the index and one for the middle finger. Each 8-bar mechanism was designed to control the angle and position of the proximal phalanx and the position of the middle phalanx. Target positions for the mechanism optimization were determined from trajectory data collected from 7 healthy subjects using color-based motion capture. The resulting robotic device was built to accommodate multiple finger sizes and finger-to-finger widths. For initial evaluation, we asked individuals with a stroke (n = 16) and without impairment (n = 4) to play a game similar to Guitar Hero while connected to FINGER.

Results: Precision design, low friction bearings, and separate high speed linear actuators allowed FINGER to individually actuate the fingers with a high bandwidth of control (-3 dB at approximately 8 Hz). During the tests, we were able to modulate the subject's success rate at the game by automatically adjusting the controller gains of FINGER. We also used FINGER to measure subjects' effort and finger individuation while playing the game.

Conclusions: Test results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to motivate subjects with an engaging game environment that challenges individuated control of the fingers, automatically control assistance levels, and quantify finger individuation after stroke.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus