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A quantitative perspective to the study of brain arterial remodeling of donors with and without HIV in the Brain Arterial Remodeling Study (BARS).

Gutierrez J, Rosoklija G, Murray J, Chon C, Elkind MS, Goldman J, Honig LS, Dwork AJ, Morgello S, Marshall RS - Front Physiol (2014)

Bottom Line: After adjusting for size, an independent association was found between lumen diameters, media and adventitia thickness with artery locations.Arterial stenosis was also associated with artery location in both large and penetrating arteries.In summary, significant effects of size and/or location were found in arterial characteristics typically used to define arterial remodeling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Mechanisms underlying brain arterial remodeling are uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that arterial size and location are important determinants of arterial characteristics. We collected large and penetrating brain arteries from cadavers with and without HIV. Morphometric characterization was obtained from digital images using color-based thresholding. The association of arterial size and location with lumen diameter, media and adventitia area, media proportion, a wall thickness, wall-to-lumen ratio and stenosis was obtained with multilevel mixed models and a P value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. We included 336 brains, in which 2279 large arteries and 1488 penetrating arteries were identified. We found that arterial size was significantly associated with all arterial characteristics studied of large and penetrating arteries with exception of arterial stenosis in large arteries. After adjusting for size, an independent association was found between lumen diameters, media and adventitia thickness with artery locations. Arterial stenosis was also associated with artery location in both large and penetrating arteries. In summary, significant effects of size and/or location were found in arterial characteristics typically used to define arterial remodeling. Brain arterial remodeling characteristics differ across arterial sizes and location, and these differences should be controlled for in future studies of brain arterial remodeling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between arterial size and wall-to-lumen ratio. (A) Large arteries, largest to smallest. (B) Penetrating arteries, largest to smallest.
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Figure 2: Relationship between arterial size and wall-to-lumen ratio. (A) Large arteries, largest to smallest. (B) Penetrating arteries, largest to smallest.

Mentions: The interadventitial diameters of large arteries ranged from 7.8 to 1.0 mm (Mean 3.0 ± 0.9 mm). As the large arteries enter the skull and give off branches, they decrease in size. Comparing proximal vs. more distal segments of the same large artery, not only did the large arteries taper in interadventitial diameter, but the lumen and all the components of the arterial wall also became smaller. The exception to this rule appears to be the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), in which the wall is thicker distally compared to the more proximal segment (Table 2). The percentage of lumen stenosis appears greater in larger arteries, although the difference is less marked than other arterial characteristics. The relative thickness of the arterial wall compared to the lumen diameter (wall-to-lumen ratio) increases as the artery becomes more distal in most large arteries, with the exception of the ICA where the wall becomes relatively thinner compared to the lumen as it enters the brain (Figure 2A).


A quantitative perspective to the study of brain arterial remodeling of donors with and without HIV in the Brain Arterial Remodeling Study (BARS).

Gutierrez J, Rosoklija G, Murray J, Chon C, Elkind MS, Goldman J, Honig LS, Dwork AJ, Morgello S, Marshall RS - Front Physiol (2014)

Relationship between arterial size and wall-to-lumen ratio. (A) Large arteries, largest to smallest. (B) Penetrating arteries, largest to smallest.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928551&req=5

Figure 2: Relationship between arterial size and wall-to-lumen ratio. (A) Large arteries, largest to smallest. (B) Penetrating arteries, largest to smallest.
Mentions: The interadventitial diameters of large arteries ranged from 7.8 to 1.0 mm (Mean 3.0 ± 0.9 mm). As the large arteries enter the skull and give off branches, they decrease in size. Comparing proximal vs. more distal segments of the same large artery, not only did the large arteries taper in interadventitial diameter, but the lumen and all the components of the arterial wall also became smaller. The exception to this rule appears to be the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), in which the wall is thicker distally compared to the more proximal segment (Table 2). The percentage of lumen stenosis appears greater in larger arteries, although the difference is less marked than other arterial characteristics. The relative thickness of the arterial wall compared to the lumen diameter (wall-to-lumen ratio) increases as the artery becomes more distal in most large arteries, with the exception of the ICA where the wall becomes relatively thinner compared to the lumen as it enters the brain (Figure 2A).

Bottom Line: After adjusting for size, an independent association was found between lumen diameters, media and adventitia thickness with artery locations.Arterial stenosis was also associated with artery location in both large and penetrating arteries.In summary, significant effects of size and/or location were found in arterial characteristics typically used to define arterial remodeling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Mechanisms underlying brain arterial remodeling are uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that arterial size and location are important determinants of arterial characteristics. We collected large and penetrating brain arteries from cadavers with and without HIV. Morphometric characterization was obtained from digital images using color-based thresholding. The association of arterial size and location with lumen diameter, media and adventitia area, media proportion, a wall thickness, wall-to-lumen ratio and stenosis was obtained with multilevel mixed models and a P value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. We included 336 brains, in which 2279 large arteries and 1488 penetrating arteries were identified. We found that arterial size was significantly associated with all arterial characteristics studied of large and penetrating arteries with exception of arterial stenosis in large arteries. After adjusting for size, an independent association was found between lumen diameters, media and adventitia thickness with artery locations. Arterial stenosis was also associated with artery location in both large and penetrating arteries. In summary, significant effects of size and/or location were found in arterial characteristics typically used to define arterial remodeling. Brain arterial remodeling characteristics differ across arterial sizes and location, and these differences should be controlled for in future studies of brain arterial remodeling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus