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A quantitative perspective to the study of brain arterial remodeling of donors with and without HIV in the Brain Arterial Remodeling Study (BARS).

Gutierrez J, Rosoklija G, Murray J, Chon C, Elkind MS, Goldman J, Honig LS, Dwork AJ, Morgello S, Marshall RS - Front Physiol (2014)

Bottom Line: After adjusting for size, an independent association was found between lumen diameters, media and adventitia thickness with artery locations.Arterial stenosis was also associated with artery location in both large and penetrating arteries.In summary, significant effects of size and/or location were found in arterial characteristics typically used to define arterial remodeling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Mechanisms underlying brain arterial remodeling are uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that arterial size and location are important determinants of arterial characteristics. We collected large and penetrating brain arteries from cadavers with and without HIV. Morphometric characterization was obtained from digital images using color-based thresholding. The association of arterial size and location with lumen diameter, media and adventitia area, media proportion, a wall thickness, wall-to-lumen ratio and stenosis was obtained with multilevel mixed models and a P value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. We included 336 brains, in which 2279 large arteries and 1488 penetrating arteries were identified. We found that arterial size was significantly associated with all arterial characteristics studied of large and penetrating arteries with exception of arterial stenosis in large arteries. After adjusting for size, an independent association was found between lumen diameters, media and adventitia thickness with artery locations. Arterial stenosis was also associated with artery location in both large and penetrating arteries. In summary, significant effects of size and/or location were found in arterial characteristics typically used to define arterial remodeling. Brain arterial remodeling characteristics differ across arterial sizes and location, and these differences should be controlled for in future studies of brain arterial remodeling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of arterial identification. (A) Circle of Willis, identification, and section of arterial segments. (B) Identification of penetrating arteries neighboring the parent large artery. D, distal; P, proximal.
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Figure 1: Examples of arterial identification. (A) Circle of Willis, identification, and section of arterial segments. (B) Identification of penetrating arteries neighboring the parent large artery. D, distal; P, proximal.

Mentions: Arteries were obtained from 336 brains, from which 2279 large brain arteries and 1488 penetrating arteries were collected (Figure 1). The brains were obtained from four different sources of tissue collection, including the Manhattan HIV Brain Bank (MHBB) at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (N = 189), the Macedonian/New York Psychiatric Institute Brain collection (N = 104), the New York Brain Bank/Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Columbia University (N = 25), and the Brain Endowment Bank at University of Miami (N = 18). The descriptions of each tissue collection, the population from which the brains were obtained, and the variable definitions are listed in Table 1. Two clinical groups of interest were identified as cases: individuals with HIV (N = 138) and individuals with pathologically-confirmed Alzheimer disease (AD) as a model of pathological aging (N = 25). HIV(−) and AD(−) controls were matched 1:1 by age (±5 years) and sex, where possible, to the cases. All brain sources had approval by the IRB at their respective institutions.


A quantitative perspective to the study of brain arterial remodeling of donors with and without HIV in the Brain Arterial Remodeling Study (BARS).

Gutierrez J, Rosoklija G, Murray J, Chon C, Elkind MS, Goldman J, Honig LS, Dwork AJ, Morgello S, Marshall RS - Front Physiol (2014)

Examples of arterial identification. (A) Circle of Willis, identification, and section of arterial segments. (B) Identification of penetrating arteries neighboring the parent large artery. D, distal; P, proximal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928551&req=5

Figure 1: Examples of arterial identification. (A) Circle of Willis, identification, and section of arterial segments. (B) Identification of penetrating arteries neighboring the parent large artery. D, distal; P, proximal.
Mentions: Arteries were obtained from 336 brains, from which 2279 large brain arteries and 1488 penetrating arteries were collected (Figure 1). The brains were obtained from four different sources of tissue collection, including the Manhattan HIV Brain Bank (MHBB) at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (N = 189), the Macedonian/New York Psychiatric Institute Brain collection (N = 104), the New York Brain Bank/Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Columbia University (N = 25), and the Brain Endowment Bank at University of Miami (N = 18). The descriptions of each tissue collection, the population from which the brains were obtained, and the variable definitions are listed in Table 1. Two clinical groups of interest were identified as cases: individuals with HIV (N = 138) and individuals with pathologically-confirmed Alzheimer disease (AD) as a model of pathological aging (N = 25). HIV(−) and AD(−) controls were matched 1:1 by age (±5 years) and sex, where possible, to the cases. All brain sources had approval by the IRB at their respective institutions.

Bottom Line: After adjusting for size, an independent association was found between lumen diameters, media and adventitia thickness with artery locations.Arterial stenosis was also associated with artery location in both large and penetrating arteries.In summary, significant effects of size and/or location were found in arterial characteristics typically used to define arterial remodeling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Mechanisms underlying brain arterial remodeling are uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that arterial size and location are important determinants of arterial characteristics. We collected large and penetrating brain arteries from cadavers with and without HIV. Morphometric characterization was obtained from digital images using color-based thresholding. The association of arterial size and location with lumen diameter, media and adventitia area, media proportion, a wall thickness, wall-to-lumen ratio and stenosis was obtained with multilevel mixed models and a P value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. We included 336 brains, in which 2279 large arteries and 1488 penetrating arteries were identified. We found that arterial size was significantly associated with all arterial characteristics studied of large and penetrating arteries with exception of arterial stenosis in large arteries. After adjusting for size, an independent association was found between lumen diameters, media and adventitia thickness with artery locations. Arterial stenosis was also associated with artery location in both large and penetrating arteries. In summary, significant effects of size and/or location were found in arterial characteristics typically used to define arterial remodeling. Brain arterial remodeling characteristics differ across arterial sizes and location, and these differences should be controlled for in future studies of brain arterial remodeling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus