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Purchase decision-making is modulated by vestibular stimulation.

Preuss N, Mast FW, Hasler G - Front Behav Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: CVS significantly reduced probability of buying a product.The results suggest that CVS interfered with emotional circuits and thus attenuated the pleasant and rewarding effect of acquisition, which in turn reduced purchase probability.The present findings contribute to the rapidly growing literature on the neural basis of purchase decision-making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Bern Berne, Switzerland ; Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory, University of Bern Berne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Purchases are driven by consumers' product preferences and price considerations. Using caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS), we investigated the role of vestibular-affective circuits in purchase decision-making. CVS is an effective noninvasive brain stimulation method, which activates vestibular and overlapping emotional circuits (e.g., the insular cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)). Subjects were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation while they performed two purchase decision-making tasks. In Experiment 1 subjects had to decide whether to purchase or not. CVS significantly reduced probability of buying a product. In Experiment 2 subjects had to rate desirability of the products and willingness to pay (WTP) while they were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation. CVS modulated desirability of the products but not WTP. The results suggest that CVS interfered with emotional circuits and thus attenuated the pleasant and rewarding effect of acquisition, which in turn reduced purchase probability. The present findings contribute to the rapidly growing literature on the neural basis of purchase decision-making.

No MeSH data available.


Results of Experiment 1, item-based analysis: CVS decreased probability of buying a product (p = 0.014).
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Figure 2: Results of Experiment 1, item-based analysis: CVS decreased probability of buying a product (p = 0.014).

Mentions: In Experiment 1, the dependent variable was the probability of buying a product. Overall probability of purchase was 40% (SEM = 0.01; range 5–76%). Products were bought significantly less often during CVS (mean probability of purchase 37.6%) when compared to sham (mean probability of purchase 42.2%), T(119) = −2.24, p = 0.014 (Figure 2). Analyzing the products separately for the order of conditions (CVS first followed by sham stimulation and vice versa) revealed a decrease in product purchase probability when sham stimulation was first (product purchase probability decreased from 0.44(sham) to 0.33(CVS)), T(119) = −3.68, p < 0.001, whereas there was no significant decrease when CVS was first (decrease from 0.42(CVS) to 0.41(sham)), T(119) = 0.49, p = 0.31.


Purchase decision-making is modulated by vestibular stimulation.

Preuss N, Mast FW, Hasler G - Front Behav Neurosci (2014)

Results of Experiment 1, item-based analysis: CVS decreased probability of buying a product (p = 0.014).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928537&req=5

Figure 2: Results of Experiment 1, item-based analysis: CVS decreased probability of buying a product (p = 0.014).
Mentions: In Experiment 1, the dependent variable was the probability of buying a product. Overall probability of purchase was 40% (SEM = 0.01; range 5–76%). Products were bought significantly less often during CVS (mean probability of purchase 37.6%) when compared to sham (mean probability of purchase 42.2%), T(119) = −2.24, p = 0.014 (Figure 2). Analyzing the products separately for the order of conditions (CVS first followed by sham stimulation and vice versa) revealed a decrease in product purchase probability when sham stimulation was first (product purchase probability decreased from 0.44(sham) to 0.33(CVS)), T(119) = −3.68, p < 0.001, whereas there was no significant decrease when CVS was first (decrease from 0.42(CVS) to 0.41(sham)), T(119) = 0.49, p = 0.31.

Bottom Line: CVS significantly reduced probability of buying a product.The results suggest that CVS interfered with emotional circuits and thus attenuated the pleasant and rewarding effect of acquisition, which in turn reduced purchase probability.The present findings contribute to the rapidly growing literature on the neural basis of purchase decision-making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Bern Berne, Switzerland ; Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory, University of Bern Berne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Purchases are driven by consumers' product preferences and price considerations. Using caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS), we investigated the role of vestibular-affective circuits in purchase decision-making. CVS is an effective noninvasive brain stimulation method, which activates vestibular and overlapping emotional circuits (e.g., the insular cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)). Subjects were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation while they performed two purchase decision-making tasks. In Experiment 1 subjects had to decide whether to purchase or not. CVS significantly reduced probability of buying a product. In Experiment 2 subjects had to rate desirability of the products and willingness to pay (WTP) while they were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation. CVS modulated desirability of the products but not WTP. The results suggest that CVS interfered with emotional circuits and thus attenuated the pleasant and rewarding effect of acquisition, which in turn reduced purchase probability. The present findings contribute to the rapidly growing literature on the neural basis of purchase decision-making.

No MeSH data available.