Limits...
Recent advances in molecular imaging of premalignant gastrointestinal lesions and future application for early detection of barrett esophagus.

Ko KH, Han NY, Kwon CI, Lee HK, Park JM, Kim EH, Hahm KB - Clin Endosc (2014)

Bottom Line: Recent advances in optical molecular imaging allow identification of morphologic and biochemical changes in tissues associated with gastrointestinal (GI) premalignant lesions earlier and in real-time.Although narrow band imaging, autofluorescence imaging, and chromoendoscopy are currently applied for this purpose in the clinic, further adoptions of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy, high-resolution microendoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and metabolomic imaging, as well as imaging mass spectrometry, will lead to detection at the earliest and will guide predictions of the clinical course in the near future in a manner that is beyond current advancements in optical imaging.In this review article, the readers will be introduced to sufficient information regarding this matter with which to enjoy this new era of high technology and to confront science in the field of molecular medical imaging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Digestive Disease Center, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Recent advances in optical molecular imaging allow identification of morphologic and biochemical changes in tissues associated with gastrointestinal (GI) premalignant lesions earlier and in real-time. This focused review series introduces high-resolution imaging modalities that are being evaluated preclinically and clinically for the detection of early GI cancers, especially Barrett esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Although narrow band imaging, autofluorescence imaging, and chromoendoscopy are currently applied for this purpose in the clinic, further adoptions of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy, high-resolution microendoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and metabolomic imaging, as well as imaging mass spectrometry, will lead to detection at the earliest and will guide predictions of the clinical course in the near future in a manner that is beyond current advancements in optical imaging. In this review article, the readers will be introduced to sufficient information regarding this matter with which to enjoy this new era of high technology and to confront science in the field of molecular medical imaging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Advances in molecular imaging technology for future medicine in gastroenterology, and cDNA microarray and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). (A) Flow for IMS as exemplified in colitic cancer. (B) Label-free protein quantification scheme for either biomarker discovery or IMS. (C) Label-based protein quantification scheme using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling. ITO, indium tin oxide; MALDI-TOF-IMS, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry; LC-MS/MS, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry; RT, chromatographic retention time; m/z, mass-to-charge ratio; PCA, principal components analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928495&req=5

Figure 2: Advances in molecular imaging technology for future medicine in gastroenterology, and cDNA microarray and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). (A) Flow for IMS as exemplified in colitic cancer. (B) Label-free protein quantification scheme for either biomarker discovery or IMS. (C) Label-based protein quantification scheme using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling. ITO, indium tin oxide; MALDI-TOF-IMS, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry; LC-MS/MS, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry; RT, chromatographic retention time; m/z, mass-to-charge ratio; PCA, principal components analysis.

Mentions: Proteomics has provided researchers with a sophisticated toolbox of labeling-based and label-free quantitative methods. Filiou et al.28 compared labeling-based and label-free quantitative proteomic techniques for clinical applications, assessed the use of labeled standards as internal controls for comparative studies in humans, and reviewed applications of labeling-based and label-free MS approaches in relevant model organisms and human subjects.29 They concluded that next generation proteomics might provide very useful insights into clinical disease pathogenesis and carcinogenesis, translating proteomics from the bench to the bedside. For instance, we have tried to identify potential biomarkers for disease discrimination or to predict the clinical course of inflammatory bowel disease, or to predict favorable response after Korean red ginseng intake using label-based isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ).30 Overall, it is clear that proteomics technologies are continuously evolving, and whether or not labeling is used is simply a matter of choice, because either way has advantages. The tremendous increase in proteome coverage over the past decade cannot be attributed to a single breakthrough, and there is ample scope for further developments. As seen in Fig. 2, we have tried to figure IMS imaging using the sample from chronic ulcerative colitis-associated colitic cancer. As shown in Fig. 2B, C, either label-free protein quantification (Fig. 2B) or label-based protein quantification (Fig. 2C) can be applied for both biomarker discovery and IMS imaging.


Recent advances in molecular imaging of premalignant gastrointestinal lesions and future application for early detection of barrett esophagus.

Ko KH, Han NY, Kwon CI, Lee HK, Park JM, Kim EH, Hahm KB - Clin Endosc (2014)

Advances in molecular imaging technology for future medicine in gastroenterology, and cDNA microarray and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). (A) Flow for IMS as exemplified in colitic cancer. (B) Label-free protein quantification scheme for either biomarker discovery or IMS. (C) Label-based protein quantification scheme using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling. ITO, indium tin oxide; MALDI-TOF-IMS, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry; LC-MS/MS, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry; RT, chromatographic retention time; m/z, mass-to-charge ratio; PCA, principal components analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928495&req=5

Figure 2: Advances in molecular imaging technology for future medicine in gastroenterology, and cDNA microarray and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). (A) Flow for IMS as exemplified in colitic cancer. (B) Label-free protein quantification scheme for either biomarker discovery or IMS. (C) Label-based protein quantification scheme using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling. ITO, indium tin oxide; MALDI-TOF-IMS, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry; LC-MS/MS, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry; RT, chromatographic retention time; m/z, mass-to-charge ratio; PCA, principal components analysis.
Mentions: Proteomics has provided researchers with a sophisticated toolbox of labeling-based and label-free quantitative methods. Filiou et al.28 compared labeling-based and label-free quantitative proteomic techniques for clinical applications, assessed the use of labeled standards as internal controls for comparative studies in humans, and reviewed applications of labeling-based and label-free MS approaches in relevant model organisms and human subjects.29 They concluded that next generation proteomics might provide very useful insights into clinical disease pathogenesis and carcinogenesis, translating proteomics from the bench to the bedside. For instance, we have tried to identify potential biomarkers for disease discrimination or to predict the clinical course of inflammatory bowel disease, or to predict favorable response after Korean red ginseng intake using label-based isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ).30 Overall, it is clear that proteomics technologies are continuously evolving, and whether or not labeling is used is simply a matter of choice, because either way has advantages. The tremendous increase in proteome coverage over the past decade cannot be attributed to a single breakthrough, and there is ample scope for further developments. As seen in Fig. 2, we have tried to figure IMS imaging using the sample from chronic ulcerative colitis-associated colitic cancer. As shown in Fig. 2B, C, either label-free protein quantification (Fig. 2B) or label-based protein quantification (Fig. 2C) can be applied for both biomarker discovery and IMS imaging.

Bottom Line: Recent advances in optical molecular imaging allow identification of morphologic and biochemical changes in tissues associated with gastrointestinal (GI) premalignant lesions earlier and in real-time.Although narrow band imaging, autofluorescence imaging, and chromoendoscopy are currently applied for this purpose in the clinic, further adoptions of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy, high-resolution microendoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and metabolomic imaging, as well as imaging mass spectrometry, will lead to detection at the earliest and will guide predictions of the clinical course in the near future in a manner that is beyond current advancements in optical imaging.In this review article, the readers will be introduced to sufficient information regarding this matter with which to enjoy this new era of high technology and to confront science in the field of molecular medical imaging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Digestive Disease Center, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Recent advances in optical molecular imaging allow identification of morphologic and biochemical changes in tissues associated with gastrointestinal (GI) premalignant lesions earlier and in real-time. This focused review series introduces high-resolution imaging modalities that are being evaluated preclinically and clinically for the detection of early GI cancers, especially Barrett esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Although narrow band imaging, autofluorescence imaging, and chromoendoscopy are currently applied for this purpose in the clinic, further adoptions of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy, high-resolution microendoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and metabolomic imaging, as well as imaging mass spectrometry, will lead to detection at the earliest and will guide predictions of the clinical course in the near future in a manner that is beyond current advancements in optical imaging. In this review article, the readers will be introduced to sufficient information regarding this matter with which to enjoy this new era of high technology and to confront science in the field of molecular medical imaging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus