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The use of nanoencapsulation to decrease human skin irritation caused by capsaicinoids.

Contri RV, Frank LA, Kaiser M, Pohlmann AR, Guterres SS - Int J Nanomedicine (2014)

Bottom Line: Capsaicin, a topical analgesic used in the treatment of chronic pain, has irritant properties that frequently interrupt its use.In this work, the effect of nanoencapsulation of the main capsaicinoids (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin) on skin irritation was tested in humans.Thirty-one percent of volunteers reported slight irritation one hour after application of CH-NC-CP, while moderate (46% [CH-ET-CP] and 23% [commercial product]) and severe (8% [CH-ET-CP] and 69% [commercial product]) irritation were described for the formulations containing free capsaicinoids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Capsaicin, a topical analgesic used in the treatment of chronic pain, has irritant properties that frequently interrupt its use. In this work, the effect of nanoencapsulation of the main capsaicinoids (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin) on skin irritation was tested in humans. Skin tolerance of a novel vehicle composed of chitosan hydrogel containing nonloaded nanocapsules (CH-NC) was also evaluated. The chitosan hydrogel containing nanoencapsulated capsaicinoids (CH-NC-CP) did not cause skin irritation, as measured by an erythema probe and on a visual scale, while a formulation containing free capsaicinoids (chitosan gel with hydroalcoholic solution [CH-ET-CP]) and a commercially available capsaicinoids formulation caused skin irritation. Thirty-one percent of volunteers reported slight irritation one hour after application of CH-NC-CP, while moderate (46% [CH-ET-CP] and 23% [commercial product]) and severe (8% [CH-ET-CP] and 69% [commercial product]) irritation were described for the formulations containing free capsaicinoids. When CH-NC was applied to the skin, erythema was not observed and only 8% of volunteers felt slight irritation, which demonstrates the utility of the novel vehicle. A complementary in vitro skin permeation study showed that permeation of capsaicinoids through an epidermal human membrane was reduced but not prevented by nanoencapsulation.

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Viscosity as a function of shear rate of (A) chitosan hydrogels containing nanocapsules and (B) chitosan hydrogels containing ethanol and a commercial formulation of capsaicinoids.Abbreviations: CH, chitosan gel; NC, nanocapsules; CP, capsaicinoids; ET, ethanolic solution; Commercial, commercial formulation.
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f1-ijn-9-951: Viscosity as a function of shear rate of (A) chitosan hydrogels containing nanocapsules and (B) chitosan hydrogels containing ethanol and a commercial formulation of capsaicinoids.Abbreviations: CH, chitosan gel; NC, nanocapsules; CP, capsaicinoids; ET, ethanolic solution; Commercial, commercial formulation.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows viscosity as a function of the shear rate applied to the semisolid formulations. Since a wide difference was observed among the formulations, it was not possible to submit all of them to the same shear rate range. Therefore, they were separated into different graphs. Figure 1A shows viscosity as a function of shear rate for the chitosan hydrogels containing the nanocapsule suspension (CH-NC-CP and CH-NC). No difference was observed when the capsaicinoids were encapsulated within the nanoparticles. Figure 1B shows viscosity as a function of shear rate for the hydrogels containing hydroalcoholic solution (CH-ETN-CP and CH-ETN) and for the commercial capsaicinoid formulation. Similarly, no difference was observed due to the presence of capsaicinoids in the gels containing ethanol.


The use of nanoencapsulation to decrease human skin irritation caused by capsaicinoids.

Contri RV, Frank LA, Kaiser M, Pohlmann AR, Guterres SS - Int J Nanomedicine (2014)

Viscosity as a function of shear rate of (A) chitosan hydrogels containing nanocapsules and (B) chitosan hydrogels containing ethanol and a commercial formulation of capsaicinoids.Abbreviations: CH, chitosan gel; NC, nanocapsules; CP, capsaicinoids; ET, ethanolic solution; Commercial, commercial formulation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928459&req=5

f1-ijn-9-951: Viscosity as a function of shear rate of (A) chitosan hydrogels containing nanocapsules and (B) chitosan hydrogels containing ethanol and a commercial formulation of capsaicinoids.Abbreviations: CH, chitosan gel; NC, nanocapsules; CP, capsaicinoids; ET, ethanolic solution; Commercial, commercial formulation.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows viscosity as a function of the shear rate applied to the semisolid formulations. Since a wide difference was observed among the formulations, it was not possible to submit all of them to the same shear rate range. Therefore, they were separated into different graphs. Figure 1A shows viscosity as a function of shear rate for the chitosan hydrogels containing the nanocapsule suspension (CH-NC-CP and CH-NC). No difference was observed when the capsaicinoids were encapsulated within the nanoparticles. Figure 1B shows viscosity as a function of shear rate for the hydrogels containing hydroalcoholic solution (CH-ETN-CP and CH-ETN) and for the commercial capsaicinoid formulation. Similarly, no difference was observed due to the presence of capsaicinoids in the gels containing ethanol.

Bottom Line: Capsaicin, a topical analgesic used in the treatment of chronic pain, has irritant properties that frequently interrupt its use.In this work, the effect of nanoencapsulation of the main capsaicinoids (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin) on skin irritation was tested in humans.Thirty-one percent of volunteers reported slight irritation one hour after application of CH-NC-CP, while moderate (46% [CH-ET-CP] and 23% [commercial product]) and severe (8% [CH-ET-CP] and 69% [commercial product]) irritation were described for the formulations containing free capsaicinoids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Capsaicin, a topical analgesic used in the treatment of chronic pain, has irritant properties that frequently interrupt its use. In this work, the effect of nanoencapsulation of the main capsaicinoids (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin) on skin irritation was tested in humans. Skin tolerance of a novel vehicle composed of chitosan hydrogel containing nonloaded nanocapsules (CH-NC) was also evaluated. The chitosan hydrogel containing nanoencapsulated capsaicinoids (CH-NC-CP) did not cause skin irritation, as measured by an erythema probe and on a visual scale, while a formulation containing free capsaicinoids (chitosan gel with hydroalcoholic solution [CH-ET-CP]) and a commercially available capsaicinoids formulation caused skin irritation. Thirty-one percent of volunteers reported slight irritation one hour after application of CH-NC-CP, while moderate (46% [CH-ET-CP] and 23% [commercial product]) and severe (8% [CH-ET-CP] and 69% [commercial product]) irritation were described for the formulations containing free capsaicinoids. When CH-NC was applied to the skin, erythema was not observed and only 8% of volunteers felt slight irritation, which demonstrates the utility of the novel vehicle. A complementary in vitro skin permeation study showed that permeation of capsaicinoids through an epidermal human membrane was reduced but not prevented by nanoencapsulation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus