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Dynamic structure of joint-action stimulus-response activity.

Malone M, Castillo RD, Kloos H, Holden JG, Richardson MJ - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Such effects are argued to provide evidence that individuals co-represent the task goals and the to-be-performed actions of a co-actor.Motivated by the complex-systems approach, the present study was designed to investigate an alternative hypothesis--that such joint-action effects are due to a dynamical (time-evolving) interpersonal coupling that operates to perturb the behavior of socially situated actors.Collectively, the findings imply that dynamic processes might underlie social stimulus-response compatibility effects and shape joint cognitive processes in general.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Cognition, Action & Perception, Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The mere presence of a co-actor can influence an individual's response behavior. For instance, a social Simon effect has been observed when two individuals perform a Go/No-Go response to one of two stimuli in the presence of each other, but not when they perform the same task alone. Such effects are argued to provide evidence that individuals co-represent the task goals and the to-be-performed actions of a co-actor. Motivated by the complex-systems approach, the present study was designed to investigate an alternative hypothesis--that such joint-action effects are due to a dynamical (time-evolving) interpersonal coupling that operates to perturb the behavior of socially situated actors. To investigate this possibility, participants performed a standard Go/No-Go Simon task in joint and individual conditions. The dynamic structure of recorded reaction times was examined using fractal statistics and instantaneous cross-correlation. Consistent with our hypothesis that participants responding in a shared space would become behaviorally coupled, the analyses revealed that reaction times in the joint condition displayed decreased fractal structure (indicative of interpersonal perturbation processes modulating ongoing participant behavior) compared to the individual condition, and were more correlated across a range of time-scales compared to the reaction times of pseudo-pair controls. Collectively, the findings imply that dynamic processes might underlie social stimulus-response compatibility effects and shape joint cognitive processes in general.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental setup for (A) the individual condition, and (B) the joint condition.
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pone-0089032-g001: Experimental setup for (A) the individual condition, and (B) the joint condition.

Mentions: Participants completed a visual go/no-go Simon task in which they were instructed to respond with a key press to a specific color of a stimulus presented on the screen. Participants were assigned only one of the two stimulus colors (e.g., red) and were instructed to respond only to their designated color, regardless of location, while ignoring the alternative color (e.g., blue). Participants completed the task in one of two experimental conditions: a joint condition or an individual condition. For the individual condition, participants performed the task alone. For the joint condition, pairs of participants performed the task together. Similar to the procedure of [6], subjects assigned to the red key sat on the right, and subjects assigned the blue key sat on the left, regardless of condition (see Figure 1). A brief instruction screen was presented on the computer monitor prior to the start of the experiment. Clarifying instructions were administered verbally and an opportunity for questions or clarification was offered.


Dynamic structure of joint-action stimulus-response activity.

Malone M, Castillo RD, Kloos H, Holden JG, Richardson MJ - PLoS ONE (2014)

Experimental setup for (A) the individual condition, and (B) the joint condition.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928400&req=5

pone-0089032-g001: Experimental setup for (A) the individual condition, and (B) the joint condition.
Mentions: Participants completed a visual go/no-go Simon task in which they were instructed to respond with a key press to a specific color of a stimulus presented on the screen. Participants were assigned only one of the two stimulus colors (e.g., red) and were instructed to respond only to their designated color, regardless of location, while ignoring the alternative color (e.g., blue). Participants completed the task in one of two experimental conditions: a joint condition or an individual condition. For the individual condition, participants performed the task alone. For the joint condition, pairs of participants performed the task together. Similar to the procedure of [6], subjects assigned to the red key sat on the right, and subjects assigned the blue key sat on the left, regardless of condition (see Figure 1). A brief instruction screen was presented on the computer monitor prior to the start of the experiment. Clarifying instructions were administered verbally and an opportunity for questions or clarification was offered.

Bottom Line: Such effects are argued to provide evidence that individuals co-represent the task goals and the to-be-performed actions of a co-actor.Motivated by the complex-systems approach, the present study was designed to investigate an alternative hypothesis--that such joint-action effects are due to a dynamical (time-evolving) interpersonal coupling that operates to perturb the behavior of socially situated actors.Collectively, the findings imply that dynamic processes might underlie social stimulus-response compatibility effects and shape joint cognitive processes in general.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Cognition, Action & Perception, Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The mere presence of a co-actor can influence an individual's response behavior. For instance, a social Simon effect has been observed when two individuals perform a Go/No-Go response to one of two stimuli in the presence of each other, but not when they perform the same task alone. Such effects are argued to provide evidence that individuals co-represent the task goals and the to-be-performed actions of a co-actor. Motivated by the complex-systems approach, the present study was designed to investigate an alternative hypothesis--that such joint-action effects are due to a dynamical (time-evolving) interpersonal coupling that operates to perturb the behavior of socially situated actors. To investigate this possibility, participants performed a standard Go/No-Go Simon task in joint and individual conditions. The dynamic structure of recorded reaction times was examined using fractal statistics and instantaneous cross-correlation. Consistent with our hypothesis that participants responding in a shared space would become behaviorally coupled, the analyses revealed that reaction times in the joint condition displayed decreased fractal structure (indicative of interpersonal perturbation processes modulating ongoing participant behavior) compared to the individual condition, and were more correlated across a range of time-scales compared to the reaction times of pseudo-pair controls. Collectively, the findings imply that dynamic processes might underlie social stimulus-response compatibility effects and shape joint cognitive processes in general.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus