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Outbreaks of the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) in the Yangtze River Delta: immigration or local reproduction?

Hu G, Lu F, Zhai BP, Lu MH, Liu WC, Zhu F, Wu XW, Chen GH, Zhang XX - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Results showed that outbreaks of N. lugens in the Yangtze River Delta were mostly associated with an extremely high increase in population.Although mass migration occurred late in the season (late August and early September), the source areas of N. lugens catches in the Yangtze River Delta were mainly located in nearby areas, including the Yangtze River Delta itself, Anhui and northern Jiangxi Provinces.These regions collectively form the lower-middle reaches of the Yangtze River, and the late migration can thus be considered as an internal bioflow within one population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Crop Diseases and Pests (Ministry of Education), College of Plant Protection, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
An effective control strategy for migratory pests is difficult to implement because the cause of infestation (i.e., immigration or local reproduction) is often not established. In particular, the outbreak mechanisms of the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), an insect causing massive losses in rice fields in the Yangtze River Delta in China, are frequently unclear. Field surveys of N. lugens were performed in Jiangsu and Zhejiang Provinces in 2008 to 2010 and related historical data from 2003 onwards were collected and analyzed to clarify the cause of these infestations. Results showed that outbreaks of N. lugens in the Yangtze River Delta were mostly associated with an extremely high increase in population. Thus, reproduction rather than immigration from distant sources were the cause of the infestations. Although mass migration occurred late in the season (late August and early September), the source areas of N. lugens catches in the Yangtze River Delta were mainly located in nearby areas, including the Yangtze River Delta itself, Anhui and northern Jiangxi Provinces. These regions collectively form the lower-middle reaches of the Yangtze River, and the late migration can thus be considered as an internal bioflow within one population.

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Number of N. lugens in paddies and caught by light trap at experimental sites.
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pone-0088973-g002: Number of N. lugens in paddies and caught by light trap at experimental sites.

Mentions: The N. lugens population in all experimental paddies was at a low density before late July and generally peaked in the second half of September (Fig. 2). In three out of the five paddies, the N. lugens population exceeded 3,000 insects per 100 hills in late September. The three paddies were in Jiangning (the maximum population was 51,140 insects per 100 hills, September 20, 2008), Yongkang (15,673 insects per 100 hills, September 18, 2009), and Wucheng (6,885 insects per 100 hills, September 16, 2010). In the first two paddies, the “hopper burn” (browning of the leaves or withering of the whole plant) areas were approximately 60% and 10% (Fig. 3 and Table 2). The damage in the paddy in Wucheng was minimal. However, excluding the paddy in Wucheng, the increase rates of N. lugens population in the other two paddies with high density were much greater than 40, which was defined by previous studies as a high increase rate (Table 2) [29]. In the paddy in Wucheng, the population increase rate was kept low after August 10. However, pesticide control was performed twice to suppress the increase in N. lugens population at this site (Tables 1 and 2).


Outbreaks of the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) in the Yangtze River Delta: immigration or local reproduction?

Hu G, Lu F, Zhai BP, Lu MH, Liu WC, Zhu F, Wu XW, Chen GH, Zhang XX - PLoS ONE (2014)

Number of N. lugens in paddies and caught by light trap at experimental sites.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928339&req=5

pone-0088973-g002: Number of N. lugens in paddies and caught by light trap at experimental sites.
Mentions: The N. lugens population in all experimental paddies was at a low density before late July and generally peaked in the second half of September (Fig. 2). In three out of the five paddies, the N. lugens population exceeded 3,000 insects per 100 hills in late September. The three paddies were in Jiangning (the maximum population was 51,140 insects per 100 hills, September 20, 2008), Yongkang (15,673 insects per 100 hills, September 18, 2009), and Wucheng (6,885 insects per 100 hills, September 16, 2010). In the first two paddies, the “hopper burn” (browning of the leaves or withering of the whole plant) areas were approximately 60% and 10% (Fig. 3 and Table 2). The damage in the paddy in Wucheng was minimal. However, excluding the paddy in Wucheng, the increase rates of N. lugens population in the other two paddies with high density were much greater than 40, which was defined by previous studies as a high increase rate (Table 2) [29]. In the paddy in Wucheng, the population increase rate was kept low after August 10. However, pesticide control was performed twice to suppress the increase in N. lugens population at this site (Tables 1 and 2).

Bottom Line: Results showed that outbreaks of N. lugens in the Yangtze River Delta were mostly associated with an extremely high increase in population.Although mass migration occurred late in the season (late August and early September), the source areas of N. lugens catches in the Yangtze River Delta were mainly located in nearby areas, including the Yangtze River Delta itself, Anhui and northern Jiangxi Provinces.These regions collectively form the lower-middle reaches of the Yangtze River, and the late migration can thus be considered as an internal bioflow within one population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Crop Diseases and Pests (Ministry of Education), College of Plant Protection, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
An effective control strategy for migratory pests is difficult to implement because the cause of infestation (i.e., immigration or local reproduction) is often not established. In particular, the outbreak mechanisms of the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), an insect causing massive losses in rice fields in the Yangtze River Delta in China, are frequently unclear. Field surveys of N. lugens were performed in Jiangsu and Zhejiang Provinces in 2008 to 2010 and related historical data from 2003 onwards were collected and analyzed to clarify the cause of these infestations. Results showed that outbreaks of N. lugens in the Yangtze River Delta were mostly associated with an extremely high increase in population. Thus, reproduction rather than immigration from distant sources were the cause of the infestations. Although mass migration occurred late in the season (late August and early September), the source areas of N. lugens catches in the Yangtze River Delta were mainly located in nearby areas, including the Yangtze River Delta itself, Anhui and northern Jiangxi Provinces. These regions collectively form the lower-middle reaches of the Yangtze River, and the late migration can thus be considered as an internal bioflow within one population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus