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The endosymbiont Hamiltonella increases the growth rate of its host Bemisia tabaci during periods of nutritional stress.

Su Q, Xie W, Wang S, Wu Q, Liu B, Fang Y, Xu B, Zhang Y - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) harbors several bacterial symbionts.Previous reports indicated that Hamiltonella increases whitefly fitness and, based on the complete sequencing of its genome, may have the ability to synthesize cofactors and amino acids that are required by its host but that are not sufficiently synthesized by the host or by the primary endosymbiont, Portiera.These data suggest that Hamiltonella may play a previously unrecognized role as a nutritional mutualist in B. tabaci.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Plant Protection, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan, People's Republic of China ; Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) harbors several bacterial symbionts. Among the secondary (facultative) symbionts, Hamiltonella has high prevalence and high infection frequencies, suggesting that it may be important for the biology and ecology of its hosts. Previous reports indicated that Hamiltonella increases whitefly fitness and, based on the complete sequencing of its genome, may have the ability to synthesize cofactors and amino acids that are required by its host but that are not sufficiently synthesized by the host or by the primary endosymbiont, Portiera. Here, we assessed the effects of Hamiltonella infection on the growth of B. tabaci reared on low-, standard-, or high-nitrogen diets. When B. tabaci was reared on a standard-nitrogen diet, no cost or benefit was associated with Hamiltonella infection. But, if we reared whiteflies on low-nitrogen diets, Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies often grew better than uninfected whiteflies. Furthermore, nitrogen levels in field-collected whiteflies indicated that the nutritional conditions in the field were comparable to the low-nitrogen diet in our laboratory experiment. These data suggest that Hamiltonella may play a previously unrecognized role as a nutritional mutualist in B. tabaci.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean relative growth rate (RGR) of B. tabaci females reared on standard diet (control) or high-nitrogen diet.Black bars and white bars indicate infected and noninfected females, respectively. Replicate numbers are noted within the columns. Values are means±SE. The experiment was performed three times (trial 1–3). For each paired comparison (± infection), asterisks indicate a significant difference (*, p<0.05) based on a t-test.
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pone-0089002-g001: Mean relative growth rate (RGR) of B. tabaci females reared on standard diet (control) or high-nitrogen diet.Black bars and white bars indicate infected and noninfected females, respectively. Replicate numbers are noted within the columns. Values are means±SE. The experiment was performed three times (trial 1–3). For each paired comparison (± infection), asterisks indicate a significant difference (*, p<0.05) based on a t-test.

Mentions: When B. tabaci females were reared on the standard diet (control), the RGR showed no significant difference between Hamiltonella-infected and noninfected whiteflies in any trials of the three experiments (Fig. 1–3). When B. tabaci females were reared on diets that contained high levels of nitrogen, Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies showed 45% higher RGR than did noninfected whiteflies in trial 1, but it showed no differences in trial 2 and 3 (Fig. 1). On a low-nitrogen diet, the RGR of Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies was 42% and 65% higher than that of noninfected ones in trial 1 and 3, respectively, but showed no difference in trial 2 (Fig. 2). On a no-nitrogen diet, the RGR of Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies were significant higher than that of noninfected ones in all three trials (Fig. 3). Regardless of diet, RGR was never lower for Hamiltonella-infected than noninfected B. tabaci females (Fig. 1–3).


The endosymbiont Hamiltonella increases the growth rate of its host Bemisia tabaci during periods of nutritional stress.

Su Q, Xie W, Wang S, Wu Q, Liu B, Fang Y, Xu B, Zhang Y - PLoS ONE (2014)

Mean relative growth rate (RGR) of B. tabaci females reared on standard diet (control) or high-nitrogen diet.Black bars and white bars indicate infected and noninfected females, respectively. Replicate numbers are noted within the columns. Values are means±SE. The experiment was performed three times (trial 1–3). For each paired comparison (± infection), asterisks indicate a significant difference (*, p<0.05) based on a t-test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928334&req=5

pone-0089002-g001: Mean relative growth rate (RGR) of B. tabaci females reared on standard diet (control) or high-nitrogen diet.Black bars and white bars indicate infected and noninfected females, respectively. Replicate numbers are noted within the columns. Values are means±SE. The experiment was performed three times (trial 1–3). For each paired comparison (± infection), asterisks indicate a significant difference (*, p<0.05) based on a t-test.
Mentions: When B. tabaci females were reared on the standard diet (control), the RGR showed no significant difference between Hamiltonella-infected and noninfected whiteflies in any trials of the three experiments (Fig. 1–3). When B. tabaci females were reared on diets that contained high levels of nitrogen, Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies showed 45% higher RGR than did noninfected whiteflies in trial 1, but it showed no differences in trial 2 and 3 (Fig. 1). On a low-nitrogen diet, the RGR of Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies was 42% and 65% higher than that of noninfected ones in trial 1 and 3, respectively, but showed no difference in trial 2 (Fig. 2). On a no-nitrogen diet, the RGR of Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies were significant higher than that of noninfected ones in all three trials (Fig. 3). Regardless of diet, RGR was never lower for Hamiltonella-infected than noninfected B. tabaci females (Fig. 1–3).

Bottom Line: The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) harbors several bacterial symbionts.Previous reports indicated that Hamiltonella increases whitefly fitness and, based on the complete sequencing of its genome, may have the ability to synthesize cofactors and amino acids that are required by its host but that are not sufficiently synthesized by the host or by the primary endosymbiont, Portiera.These data suggest that Hamiltonella may play a previously unrecognized role as a nutritional mutualist in B. tabaci.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Plant Protection, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan, People's Republic of China ; Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) harbors several bacterial symbionts. Among the secondary (facultative) symbionts, Hamiltonella has high prevalence and high infection frequencies, suggesting that it may be important for the biology and ecology of its hosts. Previous reports indicated that Hamiltonella increases whitefly fitness and, based on the complete sequencing of its genome, may have the ability to synthesize cofactors and amino acids that are required by its host but that are not sufficiently synthesized by the host or by the primary endosymbiont, Portiera. Here, we assessed the effects of Hamiltonella infection on the growth of B. tabaci reared on low-, standard-, or high-nitrogen diets. When B. tabaci was reared on a standard-nitrogen diet, no cost or benefit was associated with Hamiltonella infection. But, if we reared whiteflies on low-nitrogen diets, Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies often grew better than uninfected whiteflies. Furthermore, nitrogen levels in field-collected whiteflies indicated that the nutritional conditions in the field were comparable to the low-nitrogen diet in our laboratory experiment. These data suggest that Hamiltonella may play a previously unrecognized role as a nutritional mutualist in B. tabaci.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus