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Land cover and topography affect the land transformation caused by wind facilities.

Diffendorfer JE, Compton RW - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The scales included strings (turbines with intervening roads only), sites (strings with roads connecting them, buried cables and other infrastructure), and entire facilities (sites and the roads or transmission lines connecting them to existing infrastructure).The results indicate the landscape in which the facilities are placed affects the levels of land transformation associated with wind energy.This creates opportunities for optimizing wind energy production while minimizing land cover change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: U.S. Geological Survey, Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Land transformation (ha of surface disturbance/MW) associated with wind facilities shows wide variation in its reported values. In addition, no studies have attempted to explain the variation across facilities. We digitized land transformation at 39 wind facilities using high resolution aerial imagery. We then modeled the effects of turbine size, configuration, land cover, and topography on the levels of land transformation at three spatial scales. The scales included strings (turbines with intervening roads only), sites (strings with roads connecting them, buried cables and other infrastructure), and entire facilities (sites and the roads or transmission lines connecting them to existing infrastructure). An information theoretic modeling approach indicated land cover and topography were well-supported variables affecting land transformation, but not turbine size or configuration. Tilled landscapes, despite larger distances between turbines, had lower average land transformation, while facilities in forested landscapes generally had the highest land transformation. At site and string scales, flat topographies had the lowest land transformation, while facilities on mesas had the largest. The results indicate the landscape in which the facilities are placed affects the levels of land transformation associated with wind energy. This creates opportunities for optimizing wind energy production while minimizing land cover change. In addition, the results indicate forecasting the impacts of wind energy on land transformation should include the geographic variables affecting land transformation reported here.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean (±95% Confidence Interval) of the land transformation associated with wind facilities in different land use and cover (“Land cover”) categories at 3 spatial scales of analysis.
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pone-0088914-g001: Mean (±95% Confidence Interval) of the land transformation associated with wind facilities in different land use and cover (“Land cover”) categories at 3 spatial scales of analysis.

Mentions: At all spatial scales, facilities on tilled landscapes had lower levels of land transformation than forests and shrublands (Fig. 1). Facilities on mesas had higher land transformation values than facilities in flat topographies at the string and site scales (Fig. 2). Topography did not affect land transformation at the scale of entire facilities.


Land cover and topography affect the land transformation caused by wind facilities.

Diffendorfer JE, Compton RW - PLoS ONE (2014)

Mean (±95% Confidence Interval) of the land transformation associated with wind facilities in different land use and cover (“Land cover”) categories at 3 spatial scales of analysis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928332&req=5

pone-0088914-g001: Mean (±95% Confidence Interval) of the land transformation associated with wind facilities in different land use and cover (“Land cover”) categories at 3 spatial scales of analysis.
Mentions: At all spatial scales, facilities on tilled landscapes had lower levels of land transformation than forests and shrublands (Fig. 1). Facilities on mesas had higher land transformation values than facilities in flat topographies at the string and site scales (Fig. 2). Topography did not affect land transformation at the scale of entire facilities.

Bottom Line: The scales included strings (turbines with intervening roads only), sites (strings with roads connecting them, buried cables and other infrastructure), and entire facilities (sites and the roads or transmission lines connecting them to existing infrastructure).The results indicate the landscape in which the facilities are placed affects the levels of land transformation associated with wind energy.This creates opportunities for optimizing wind energy production while minimizing land cover change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: U.S. Geological Survey, Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Land transformation (ha of surface disturbance/MW) associated with wind facilities shows wide variation in its reported values. In addition, no studies have attempted to explain the variation across facilities. We digitized land transformation at 39 wind facilities using high resolution aerial imagery. We then modeled the effects of turbine size, configuration, land cover, and topography on the levels of land transformation at three spatial scales. The scales included strings (turbines with intervening roads only), sites (strings with roads connecting them, buried cables and other infrastructure), and entire facilities (sites and the roads or transmission lines connecting them to existing infrastructure). An information theoretic modeling approach indicated land cover and topography were well-supported variables affecting land transformation, but not turbine size or configuration. Tilled landscapes, despite larger distances between turbines, had lower average land transformation, while facilities in forested landscapes generally had the highest land transformation. At site and string scales, flat topographies had the lowest land transformation, while facilities on mesas had the largest. The results indicate the landscape in which the facilities are placed affects the levels of land transformation associated with wind energy. This creates opportunities for optimizing wind energy production while minimizing land cover change. In addition, the results indicate forecasting the impacts of wind energy on land transformation should include the geographic variables affecting land transformation reported here.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus