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A prospective study of vitamin and mineral supplement use and the risk of upper gastrointestinal cancers.

Dawsey SP, Hollenbeck A, Schatzkin A, Abnet CC - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox models with adjustment for potential confounders.Among individual vitamin or mineral supplements, use of iron supplements was associated with significantly lower risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (HR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.49 to 0.94) and a significantly increased risk of gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (HR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.24 to 2.05).We saw no evidence that multivitamin use was associated with reduced risk of four highly fatal upper gastrointestinal cancers, but there were some differences in risk with reported use of individual supplements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We examined the association of use of multivitamins or single vitamin/mineral supplements with risk of four upper gastrointestinal cancers in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort with 11 years of follow-up. After exclusions, 490,593 persons were included in our analytic cohort and 1780 upper gastrointestinal cancers were accrued. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox models with adjustment for potential confounders. We observed no significant associations between multivitamin use and risk for the four cancer outcomes in crude or adjusted models. Among individual vitamin or mineral supplements, use of iron supplements was associated with significantly lower risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (HR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.49 to 0.94) and a significantly increased risk of gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (HR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.24 to 2.05). For gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma, we saw associations with zinc use (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.62) and vitamin C use (HR = 0.79 95% CI = 0.65 to 0.96). Calcium use, some of which was reported as antacids and used to treat reflux disease, was associated with higher risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.52) and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.56) cancers. We saw no evidence that multivitamin use was associated with reduced risk of four highly fatal upper gastrointestinal cancers, but there were some differences in risk with reported use of individual supplements.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for any use of multivitamin supplements for four upper gastrointestinal cancers stratified by sex or smoking in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort.Of the eight tests, only smoking status for esophageal adenocarcinoma showed significant effect modification (P = 0.022), but the estimates in both strata have confidence intervals that include 1.
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pone-0088774-g001: Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for any use of multivitamin supplements for four upper gastrointestinal cancers stratified by sex or smoking in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort.Of the eight tests, only smoking status for esophageal adenocarcinoma showed significant effect modification (P = 0.022), but the estimates in both strata have confidence intervals that include 1.

Mentions: We tested for effect modification between any multivitamin use and sex or ever smoking for each of the four cancers (eight interaction tests). Figure 1 presents risk estimates for each of the four strata (men or women; never smoker or ever smoker). For seven of the eight stratifications there was no evidence of difference, but the interaction test for multivitamin use by smoking status was statistically significant for esophageal adenocarcinoma (P = 0.015), however risk estimates for both strata included one. For gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, the risk estimate for never smokers was significant, but the interaction test was not (P = 0.33), suggesting no difference in effect from the overall estimate.


A prospective study of vitamin and mineral supplement use and the risk of upper gastrointestinal cancers.

Dawsey SP, Hollenbeck A, Schatzkin A, Abnet CC - PLoS ONE (2014)

Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for any use of multivitamin supplements for four upper gastrointestinal cancers stratified by sex or smoking in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort.Of the eight tests, only smoking status for esophageal adenocarcinoma showed significant effect modification (P = 0.022), but the estimates in both strata have confidence intervals that include 1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3928299&req=5

pone-0088774-g001: Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for any use of multivitamin supplements for four upper gastrointestinal cancers stratified by sex or smoking in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort.Of the eight tests, only smoking status for esophageal adenocarcinoma showed significant effect modification (P = 0.022), but the estimates in both strata have confidence intervals that include 1.
Mentions: We tested for effect modification between any multivitamin use and sex or ever smoking for each of the four cancers (eight interaction tests). Figure 1 presents risk estimates for each of the four strata (men or women; never smoker or ever smoker). For seven of the eight stratifications there was no evidence of difference, but the interaction test for multivitamin use by smoking status was statistically significant for esophageal adenocarcinoma (P = 0.015), however risk estimates for both strata included one. For gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, the risk estimate for never smokers was significant, but the interaction test was not (P = 0.33), suggesting no difference in effect from the overall estimate.

Bottom Line: Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox models with adjustment for potential confounders.Among individual vitamin or mineral supplements, use of iron supplements was associated with significantly lower risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (HR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.49 to 0.94) and a significantly increased risk of gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (HR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.24 to 2.05).We saw no evidence that multivitamin use was associated with reduced risk of four highly fatal upper gastrointestinal cancers, but there were some differences in risk with reported use of individual supplements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We examined the association of use of multivitamins or single vitamin/mineral supplements with risk of four upper gastrointestinal cancers in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort with 11 years of follow-up. After exclusions, 490,593 persons were included in our analytic cohort and 1780 upper gastrointestinal cancers were accrued. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox models with adjustment for potential confounders. We observed no significant associations between multivitamin use and risk for the four cancer outcomes in crude or adjusted models. Among individual vitamin or mineral supplements, use of iron supplements was associated with significantly lower risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (HR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.49 to 0.94) and a significantly increased risk of gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (HR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.24 to 2.05). For gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma, we saw associations with zinc use (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.62) and vitamin C use (HR = 0.79 95% CI = 0.65 to 0.96). Calcium use, some of which was reported as antacids and used to treat reflux disease, was associated with higher risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.52) and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.56) cancers. We saw no evidence that multivitamin use was associated with reduced risk of four highly fatal upper gastrointestinal cancers, but there were some differences in risk with reported use of individual supplements.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus