Limits...
The seasonal variation of Achilles tendon ruptures in Vancouver, Canada: a retrospective study.

Scott A, Grewal N, Guy P - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: In total, 76% of cases were specified as sport related.The distribution of injuries varied significantly across seasons (χ(2), p<0.05), with significantly more cases occurring in spring.The increase in the number of cases in spring was due to sport-related injuries, whereas non-sport-related cases were distributed evenly throughout the year.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the seasonal distribution of tendon ruptures in a large cohort of patients from Vancouver, Canada.

Design: Retrospective chart review.

Setting: Acute Achilles tendon rupture cases that occurred from 1987 to 2010 at an academic hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Information was extracted from an orthopaedic database.

Participants: No direct contact was made with the participants. The following information was extracted from the OrthoTrauma database: age, sex, date of injury and season (winter, spring, summer and autumn), date of surgery if date of injury was unknown and type of injury (sport related or non-sport related/unspecified). Only acute Achilles tendon rupture cases were included; chronic cases were excluded along with those that were conservatively managed.

Primary and secondary outcomes: The primary outcome was to determine the seasonal pattern of Achilles tendon rupture. Secondary outcomes, such as differences in gender and mechanism of sport (non-sport vs sport related), were also assessed.

Results: There were 543 cases in total; 83% of the cases were men (average age 39.3) and 17% were women (average age 37.3). In total, 76% of cases were specified as sport related. The distribution of injuries varied significantly across seasons (χ(2), p<0.05), with significantly more cases occurring in spring. The increase in the number of cases in spring was due to sport-related injuries, whereas non-sport-related cases were distributed evenly throughout the year.

Conclusions: The seasonality of sport-related Achilles tendon ruptures should be considered when developing preventive strategies and when timing their delivery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The seasonal pattern of Achilles tendon ruptures. Sport-related and non-sport-related/unspecified injuries are shown separately—the seasonal pattern is statistically significant (p<0.05) only for the sport-related cases.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927994&req=5

BMJOPEN2013004320F2: The seasonal pattern of Achilles tendon ruptures. Sport-related and non-sport-related/unspecified injuries are shown separately—the seasonal pattern is statistically significant (p<0.05) only for the sport-related cases.

Mentions: There was a clear seasonal pattern (p=0.03, figure 2), with the highest number of cases occurring in spring (n=161) and the lowest in winter (n=121) and fall (n=119). When the seasonal pattern was examined specifically in sport-related cases, the statistical significance of the χ2 test increased (p=0.022). By contrast, the non-sport-related/unspecified cases did not display any trend towards a seasonal effect.


The seasonal variation of Achilles tendon ruptures in Vancouver, Canada: a retrospective study.

Scott A, Grewal N, Guy P - BMJ Open (2014)

The seasonal pattern of Achilles tendon ruptures. Sport-related and non-sport-related/unspecified injuries are shown separately—the seasonal pattern is statistically significant (p<0.05) only for the sport-related cases.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927994&req=5

BMJOPEN2013004320F2: The seasonal pattern of Achilles tendon ruptures. Sport-related and non-sport-related/unspecified injuries are shown separately—the seasonal pattern is statistically significant (p<0.05) only for the sport-related cases.
Mentions: There was a clear seasonal pattern (p=0.03, figure 2), with the highest number of cases occurring in spring (n=161) and the lowest in winter (n=121) and fall (n=119). When the seasonal pattern was examined specifically in sport-related cases, the statistical significance of the χ2 test increased (p=0.022). By contrast, the non-sport-related/unspecified cases did not display any trend towards a seasonal effect.

Bottom Line: In total, 76% of cases were specified as sport related.The distribution of injuries varied significantly across seasons (χ(2), p<0.05), with significantly more cases occurring in spring.The increase in the number of cases in spring was due to sport-related injuries, whereas non-sport-related cases were distributed evenly throughout the year.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the seasonal distribution of tendon ruptures in a large cohort of patients from Vancouver, Canada.

Design: Retrospective chart review.

Setting: Acute Achilles tendon rupture cases that occurred from 1987 to 2010 at an academic hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Information was extracted from an orthopaedic database.

Participants: No direct contact was made with the participants. The following information was extracted from the OrthoTrauma database: age, sex, date of injury and season (winter, spring, summer and autumn), date of surgery if date of injury was unknown and type of injury (sport related or non-sport related/unspecified). Only acute Achilles tendon rupture cases were included; chronic cases were excluded along with those that were conservatively managed.

Primary and secondary outcomes: The primary outcome was to determine the seasonal pattern of Achilles tendon rupture. Secondary outcomes, such as differences in gender and mechanism of sport (non-sport vs sport related), were also assessed.

Results: There were 543 cases in total; 83% of the cases were men (average age 39.3) and 17% were women (average age 37.3). In total, 76% of cases were specified as sport related. The distribution of injuries varied significantly across seasons (χ(2), p<0.05), with significantly more cases occurring in spring. The increase in the number of cases in spring was due to sport-related injuries, whereas non-sport-related cases were distributed evenly throughout the year.

Conclusions: The seasonality of sport-related Achilles tendon ruptures should be considered when developing preventive strategies and when timing their delivery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus