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A novel in vivo platform for studying alveolar bone regeneration in rat.

Kim JH, Moon HJ, Kim TH, Jo JM, Yang SH, Naskar D, Kundu SC, Chrzanowski W, Kim HW - J Tissue Eng (2013)

Bottom Line: Rat premaxillary bone defects were filled with silk scaffold or remained empty during the implantation period (up to 6 weeks), and harvested samples were analyzed by micro-computed tomography and histopathology.Empty defects showed increased but limited new bone formation with increasing implantation period.In defects implanted with silk sponge, the bone formation was significantly greater than that of empty defect, indicating an effective role of silk scaffold in the defect model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan, Republic of Korea ; Department of Nanobiomedical Science & BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Alveolar bone regeneration is a significant challenge in dental implantation. Novel biomaterials and tissue-engineered constructs are under extensive development and awaiting in vivo animal tests to find clinical endpoint. Here, we establish a novel in vivo model, modifying gingivoperiosteoplasty in rat for the alveolar bone regeneration. Rat premaxillary bone defects were filled with silk scaffold or remained empty during the implantation period (up to 6 weeks), and harvested samples were analyzed by micro-computed tomography and histopathology. Empty defects showed increased but limited new bone formation with increasing implantation period. In defects implanted with silk sponge, the bone formation was significantly greater than that of empty defect, indicating an effective role of silk scaffold in the defect model. The modified premaxillary defect model in rat is simple to perform, while mimicking the clinical conditions, finding usefulness for the development of biomaterials and tissue-engineered constructs targeting alveolar bone regeneration in dental implantation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photographs of rat premaxillary operation field. Note the dimensions of the defect used to produce standardized 4-mm-diameter semicircular defects. (a) Following an x-shape incision through the palatal gingival epithelium, (b) the underlying maxillary alveolar bone was exposed. (c and d) A 4-mm-diameter semicircular defect was created at the center region of the upper incisor socket, between the anterior and posterior inner margins of incisor teeth, on the lateral surface of each premaxilla bone. (e) Two defects were created on one animal and (f) were filled with silk scaffolds.
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fig2-2041731413517705: Photographs of rat premaxillary operation field. Note the dimensions of the defect used to produce standardized 4-mm-diameter semicircular defects. (a) Following an x-shape incision through the palatal gingival epithelium, (b) the underlying maxillary alveolar bone was exposed. (c and d) A 4-mm-diameter semicircular defect was created at the center region of the upper incisor socket, between the anterior and posterior inner margins of incisor teeth, on the lateral surface of each premaxilla bone. (e) Two defects were created on one animal and (f) were filled with silk scaffolds.

Mentions: Following an incision through the palatal gingival epithelium using a 10 blade with a bard-parker scalpel, the underlying maxillary alveolar bone of the premaxilla was exposed (Figure 2(a) and (b)). A surgical trephine bur was used to create a standardized, semicircular defect 4 mm in diameter at the center region of the upper incisor socket, between the anterior and posterior inner margins of the incisor teeth on the lateral surface of each premaxilla bone. While using the bur, copious irrigation was done with cooled sterile isotonic saline. The defect was either left empty or filled with the trialed 3D silk sponge (Figure 2(c) and (d)). Two defects were created in each animal (Figure 2(e)), and the animals were assigned to four groups—Group A: empty defect with 2 weeks healing; Group B: empty defect with 4 weeks healing; Group C: empty defect with 6 weeks healing; and Group D: silk scaffold with 6 weeks healing (Figure 2(f)).


A novel in vivo platform for studying alveolar bone regeneration in rat.

Kim JH, Moon HJ, Kim TH, Jo JM, Yang SH, Naskar D, Kundu SC, Chrzanowski W, Kim HW - J Tissue Eng (2013)

Photographs of rat premaxillary operation field. Note the dimensions of the defect used to produce standardized 4-mm-diameter semicircular defects. (a) Following an x-shape incision through the palatal gingival epithelium, (b) the underlying maxillary alveolar bone was exposed. (c and d) A 4-mm-diameter semicircular defect was created at the center region of the upper incisor socket, between the anterior and posterior inner margins of incisor teeth, on the lateral surface of each premaxilla bone. (e) Two defects were created on one animal and (f) were filled with silk scaffolds.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927964&req=5

fig2-2041731413517705: Photographs of rat premaxillary operation field. Note the dimensions of the defect used to produce standardized 4-mm-diameter semicircular defects. (a) Following an x-shape incision through the palatal gingival epithelium, (b) the underlying maxillary alveolar bone was exposed. (c and d) A 4-mm-diameter semicircular defect was created at the center region of the upper incisor socket, between the anterior and posterior inner margins of incisor teeth, on the lateral surface of each premaxilla bone. (e) Two defects were created on one animal and (f) were filled with silk scaffolds.
Mentions: Following an incision through the palatal gingival epithelium using a 10 blade with a bard-parker scalpel, the underlying maxillary alveolar bone of the premaxilla was exposed (Figure 2(a) and (b)). A surgical trephine bur was used to create a standardized, semicircular defect 4 mm in diameter at the center region of the upper incisor socket, between the anterior and posterior inner margins of the incisor teeth on the lateral surface of each premaxilla bone. While using the bur, copious irrigation was done with cooled sterile isotonic saline. The defect was either left empty or filled with the trialed 3D silk sponge (Figure 2(c) and (d)). Two defects were created in each animal (Figure 2(e)), and the animals were assigned to four groups—Group A: empty defect with 2 weeks healing; Group B: empty defect with 4 weeks healing; Group C: empty defect with 6 weeks healing; and Group D: silk scaffold with 6 weeks healing (Figure 2(f)).

Bottom Line: Rat premaxillary bone defects were filled with silk scaffold or remained empty during the implantation period (up to 6 weeks), and harvested samples were analyzed by micro-computed tomography and histopathology.Empty defects showed increased but limited new bone formation with increasing implantation period.In defects implanted with silk sponge, the bone formation was significantly greater than that of empty defect, indicating an effective role of silk scaffold in the defect model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan, Republic of Korea ; Department of Nanobiomedical Science & BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Alveolar bone regeneration is a significant challenge in dental implantation. Novel biomaterials and tissue-engineered constructs are under extensive development and awaiting in vivo animal tests to find clinical endpoint. Here, we establish a novel in vivo model, modifying gingivoperiosteoplasty in rat for the alveolar bone regeneration. Rat premaxillary bone defects were filled with silk scaffold or remained empty during the implantation period (up to 6 weeks), and harvested samples were analyzed by micro-computed tomography and histopathology. Empty defects showed increased but limited new bone formation with increasing implantation period. In defects implanted with silk sponge, the bone formation was significantly greater than that of empty defect, indicating an effective role of silk scaffold in the defect model. The modified premaxillary defect model in rat is simple to perform, while mimicking the clinical conditions, finding usefulness for the development of biomaterials and tissue-engineered constructs targeting alveolar bone regeneration in dental implantation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus