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History of the invasive African olive tree in Australia and Hawaii: evidence for sequential bottlenecks and hybridization with the Mediterranean olive.

Besnard G, Dupuy J, Larter M, Cuneo P, Cooke D, Chikhi L - Evol Appl (2013)

Bottom Line: Humans have introduced plants and animals into new continents and islands with negative effects on local species.Two subspecies were introduced in Australia, and each successfully invaded a specific area: the African olive in New South Wales (NSW) and the Mediterranean olive in South Australia.Furthermore, using an approximate Bayesian computation framework, we found strong support for the serial introduction of the African olive from South Africa to NSW and then from NSW to Hawaii.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire Evolution & Diversité Biologique, CNRS, UPS, ENFA, UMR 5174 Toulouse, France.

ABSTRACT
Humans have introduced plants and animals into new continents and islands with negative effects on local species. This has been the case of the olive that was introduced in Australia, New Zealand and Pacific islands where it became invasive. Two subspecies were introduced in Australia, and each successfully invaded a specific area: the African olive in New South Wales (NSW) and the Mediterranean olive in South Australia. Here, we examine their origins and spread and analyse a large sample of native and invasive accessions with chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites. African olive populations from the invaded range exhibit two South African chlorotypes hence supporting an introduction from South Africa, while populations from South Australia exhibit chlorotypes of Mediterranean cultivars. Congruently, nuclear markers support the occurrence of two lineages in Australia but demonstrate that admixture took place, attesting that they hybridized early after introduction. Furthermore, using an approximate Bayesian computation framework, we found strong support for the serial introduction of the African olive from South Africa to NSW and then from NSW to Hawaii. The taxon experienced successive bottlenecks that did not preclude invasion, meaning that rapid decisions need to be taken to avoid naturalization where it has not established a large population yet.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prior and posterior density curves for all demographic parameters. All posterior and prior densities were computed with DiyABC version 2.0 (Cornuet et al. submitted) and were estimated from 500 000 and 5000 samples, respectively (i.e. the best 1% of the 500 000 simulated data). A. Effective numbers of founding individuals in the invasive range (N1 and N2); B. Effective population size in number of individuals in both native (Ne1) and invasive (Ne2 and Ne3) ranges; (C) Latency phase after introduction in the invasive range (db1 and db2; in number of generations); (D) Number of generations since introduction to NSW, Australia (T1), and since second introduction to Maui, Hawaii (T2); E. Severity of the bottleneck during the first and the second events of introduction (K1 and K2).
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fig04: Prior and posterior density curves for all demographic parameters. All posterior and prior densities were computed with DiyABC version 2.0 (Cornuet et al. submitted) and were estimated from 500 000 and 5000 samples, respectively (i.e. the best 1% of the 500 000 simulated data). A. Effective numbers of founding individuals in the invasive range (N1 and N2); B. Effective population size in number of individuals in both native (Ne1) and invasive (Ne2 and Ne3) ranges; (C) Latency phase after introduction in the invasive range (db1 and db2; in number of generations); (D) Number of generations since introduction to NSW, Australia (T1), and since second introduction to Maui, Hawaii (T2); E. Severity of the bottleneck during the first and the second events of introduction (K1 and K2).

Mentions: Because scenario 1 was identified as the most probable, posterior distributions for the parameters of interest were inferred for this scenario only. Figure 4 shows the priors and posteriors for all parameters, and Table 1 provides the mean, median and mode estimated for these distributions. For some parameters, the posterior differs noticeably from the prior (e.g. N2, Ne1; Fig. 4A,B). This suggests that the genetic data contain substantial information to estimate these demographic parameters. For other parameters (e.g. Ne2; Fig. 4B), little information seems to be provided beyond that present in the prior. We focus on modal values below, but are aware that the distributions are sometimes wide and that no single estimate (mean, median or mode) fully summarizes our results.


History of the invasive African olive tree in Australia and Hawaii: evidence for sequential bottlenecks and hybridization with the Mediterranean olive.

Besnard G, Dupuy J, Larter M, Cuneo P, Cooke D, Chikhi L - Evol Appl (2013)

Prior and posterior density curves for all demographic parameters. All posterior and prior densities were computed with DiyABC version 2.0 (Cornuet et al. submitted) and were estimated from 500 000 and 5000 samples, respectively (i.e. the best 1% of the 500 000 simulated data). A. Effective numbers of founding individuals in the invasive range (N1 and N2); B. Effective population size in number of individuals in both native (Ne1) and invasive (Ne2 and Ne3) ranges; (C) Latency phase after introduction in the invasive range (db1 and db2; in number of generations); (D) Number of generations since introduction to NSW, Australia (T1), and since second introduction to Maui, Hawaii (T2); E. Severity of the bottleneck during the first and the second events of introduction (K1 and K2).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927883&req=5

fig04: Prior and posterior density curves for all demographic parameters. All posterior and prior densities were computed with DiyABC version 2.0 (Cornuet et al. submitted) and were estimated from 500 000 and 5000 samples, respectively (i.e. the best 1% of the 500 000 simulated data). A. Effective numbers of founding individuals in the invasive range (N1 and N2); B. Effective population size in number of individuals in both native (Ne1) and invasive (Ne2 and Ne3) ranges; (C) Latency phase after introduction in the invasive range (db1 and db2; in number of generations); (D) Number of generations since introduction to NSW, Australia (T1), and since second introduction to Maui, Hawaii (T2); E. Severity of the bottleneck during the first and the second events of introduction (K1 and K2).
Mentions: Because scenario 1 was identified as the most probable, posterior distributions for the parameters of interest were inferred for this scenario only. Figure 4 shows the priors and posteriors for all parameters, and Table 1 provides the mean, median and mode estimated for these distributions. For some parameters, the posterior differs noticeably from the prior (e.g. N2, Ne1; Fig. 4A,B). This suggests that the genetic data contain substantial information to estimate these demographic parameters. For other parameters (e.g. Ne2; Fig. 4B), little information seems to be provided beyond that present in the prior. We focus on modal values below, but are aware that the distributions are sometimes wide and that no single estimate (mean, median or mode) fully summarizes our results.

Bottom Line: Humans have introduced plants and animals into new continents and islands with negative effects on local species.Two subspecies were introduced in Australia, and each successfully invaded a specific area: the African olive in New South Wales (NSW) and the Mediterranean olive in South Australia.Furthermore, using an approximate Bayesian computation framework, we found strong support for the serial introduction of the African olive from South Africa to NSW and then from NSW to Hawaii.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire Evolution & Diversité Biologique, CNRS, UPS, ENFA, UMR 5174 Toulouse, France.

ABSTRACT
Humans have introduced plants and animals into new continents and islands with negative effects on local species. This has been the case of the olive that was introduced in Australia, New Zealand and Pacific islands where it became invasive. Two subspecies were introduced in Australia, and each successfully invaded a specific area: the African olive in New South Wales (NSW) and the Mediterranean olive in South Australia. Here, we examine their origins and spread and analyse a large sample of native and invasive accessions with chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites. African olive populations from the invaded range exhibit two South African chlorotypes hence supporting an introduction from South Africa, while populations from South Australia exhibit chlorotypes of Mediterranean cultivars. Congruently, nuclear markers support the occurrence of two lineages in Australia but demonstrate that admixture took place, attesting that they hybridized early after introduction. Furthermore, using an approximate Bayesian computation framework, we found strong support for the serial introduction of the African olive from South Africa to NSW and then from NSW to Hawaii. The taxon experienced successive bottlenecks that did not preclude invasion, meaning that rapid decisions need to be taken to avoid naturalization where it has not established a large population yet.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus