Limits...
Daytime sleepiness: associations with alcohol use and sleep duration in americans.

Chakravorty S, Jackson N, Chaudhary N, Kozak PJ, Perlis ML, Shue HR, Grandner MA - Sleep Disord (2014)

Bottom Line: The results showed that daytime sleepiness was reported by 15.07% of the subjects.An interaction between decreased sleep duration and an increased log heavy drinking frequency predicted increased daytime sleepiness (P = 0.004).Thus, the effect of sleep duration should be considered when evaluating the relationship between daytime sleepiness and heavy drinking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MIRECC VISN-4, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University & Woodland Avenues, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA ; Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the current analysis was to investigate the relationship of daytime sleepiness with alcohol consumption and sleep duration using a population sample of adult Americans. Data was analyzed from adult respondents of the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2008 (N = 2919) using self-reported variables for sleepiness, sleep duration, and alcohol consumption (quantity and frequency of alcohol use). A heavy drinking episode was defined as the consumption of ≥5 standard alcoholic beverages in a day. Logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic variables and insomnia covariates were used to evaluate the relationship between daytime sleepiness and an interaction of alcohol consumption variables with sleep duration. The results showed that daytime sleepiness was reported by 15.07% of the subjects. In univariate analyses adjusted for covariates, an increased probability of daytime sleepiness was predicted by decreased log drinks per day [OR = 0.74 (95% CI, 0.58-0.95)], a decreased log drinking frequency [0.90 (95% CI, 0.83-0.98)], and lower sleep duration [OR = 0.75 (95% CI, 0.67-0.84)]. An interaction between decreased sleep duration and an increased log heavy drinking frequency predicted increased daytime sleepiness (P = 0.004). Thus, the effect of sleep duration should be considered when evaluating the relationship between daytime sleepiness and heavy drinking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Surface model of the interaction between heavy drinking frequency and sleep duration on daytime sleepiness.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927862&req=5

fig1: Surface model of the interaction between heavy drinking frequency and sleep duration on daytime sleepiness.

Mentions: In models adjusted for covariates, an interaction between a decreased sleep duration and an increased log frequency of binge-drinking predicted increased daytime sleepiness (P = 0.004), such that with each percent increase in the binge-drinking frequency and a decrease in the sleep duration in hours, there was an increased probability of reporting daytime sleepiness; see Table 3, and Figure 1. No significant interactions between other alcohol consumption variables and sleep duration predicted daytime sleepiness.


Daytime sleepiness: associations with alcohol use and sleep duration in americans.

Chakravorty S, Jackson N, Chaudhary N, Kozak PJ, Perlis ML, Shue HR, Grandner MA - Sleep Disord (2014)

Surface model of the interaction between heavy drinking frequency and sleep duration on daytime sleepiness.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927862&req=5

fig1: Surface model of the interaction between heavy drinking frequency and sleep duration on daytime sleepiness.
Mentions: In models adjusted for covariates, an interaction between a decreased sleep duration and an increased log frequency of binge-drinking predicted increased daytime sleepiness (P = 0.004), such that with each percent increase in the binge-drinking frequency and a decrease in the sleep duration in hours, there was an increased probability of reporting daytime sleepiness; see Table 3, and Figure 1. No significant interactions between other alcohol consumption variables and sleep duration predicted daytime sleepiness.

Bottom Line: The results showed that daytime sleepiness was reported by 15.07% of the subjects.An interaction between decreased sleep duration and an increased log heavy drinking frequency predicted increased daytime sleepiness (P = 0.004).Thus, the effect of sleep duration should be considered when evaluating the relationship between daytime sleepiness and heavy drinking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MIRECC VISN-4, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University & Woodland Avenues, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA ; Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the current analysis was to investigate the relationship of daytime sleepiness with alcohol consumption and sleep duration using a population sample of adult Americans. Data was analyzed from adult respondents of the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2008 (N = 2919) using self-reported variables for sleepiness, sleep duration, and alcohol consumption (quantity and frequency of alcohol use). A heavy drinking episode was defined as the consumption of ≥5 standard alcoholic beverages in a day. Logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic variables and insomnia covariates were used to evaluate the relationship between daytime sleepiness and an interaction of alcohol consumption variables with sleep duration. The results showed that daytime sleepiness was reported by 15.07% of the subjects. In univariate analyses adjusted for covariates, an increased probability of daytime sleepiness was predicted by decreased log drinks per day [OR = 0.74 (95% CI, 0.58-0.95)], a decreased log drinking frequency [0.90 (95% CI, 0.83-0.98)], and lower sleep duration [OR = 0.75 (95% CI, 0.67-0.84)]. An interaction between decreased sleep duration and an increased log heavy drinking frequency predicted increased daytime sleepiness (P = 0.004). Thus, the effect of sleep duration should be considered when evaluating the relationship between daytime sleepiness and heavy drinking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus