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Pain Symptoms in Fibromyalgia Patients with and without Provoked Vulvodynia.

Ghizzani A, Di Sabatino V, Suman AL, Biasi G, Santarcangelo EL, Carli G - Pain Res Treat (2014)

Bottom Line: The vulvar excitability was significantly higher in FMS+PVD than in FMS and in both groups than in Controls.Conclusions.Results suggest that coital pain develops in patients with higher FMS symptoms severity due to the cooperative effects of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Medicine and Development, Siena University Hospital, 53100 Siena, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Objective. The aim of the study was to compare the pain symptoms of fibromyalgia patients exhibiting (FMS+PVD) and not exhibiting (FMS) comorbidity with provoked vulvodynia. Study Design. The case control study was performed in 39 patients who had been diagnosed with FMS and accepted to undergo gynaecological examination and in 36 healthy women (C). All patients completed standardized questionnaires for pain intensity, pain area, and psychological functioning. The gynaecological examination included vulvar pain pressure reactivity (Q-tip), pelvic tone assessment (Kegel manoeuver), and a semistructured interview collecting detailed information about pelvic symptoms and sexual function. Results. FMS+PVD patients displayed a higher number of associated symptoms than FMS patients. The vulvar excitability was significantly higher in FMS+PVD than in FMS and in both groups than in Controls. Half of FMS+PVD patients were positive to Kegel manoeuver and displayed higher scores in widespread pain intensity, STAI-Y2, and CESD levels than Kegel negative patients. Conclusions. The study reveals that increased vulvar pain excitability may occur in FMS patients independently of the presence of coital pain. Results suggest that coital pain develops in patients with higher FMS symptoms severity due to the cooperative effects of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of total vulvar pain intensity scores in all groups. Note the overlap of FMS and FMS + PVD scores. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.
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fig2: Distribution of total vulvar pain intensity scores in all groups. Note the overlap of FMS and FMS + PVD scores. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.

Mentions: The mean Q-tip pain intensity score (Figure 1(b)) was significantly different between FMS and FMS + PVD (t(1,37) = 2.832, P < 0.008), FMS + PVD and Controls (t(1,55) = 10.599, P < 0.0001), and FMS and Controls (t(1,52) = 5.877, P < 0.001). Figure 2 shows the distribution of the total pain intensity scores of the 3 groups (FMS + PVD > C, t(1,55) = 12.586, P < 0.0001); FMS > C, (t(1,52) = 7.394, P < 0.0001); FMS + PVD > FMS, t(1,37) = 3.666, P < 0.001).


Pain Symptoms in Fibromyalgia Patients with and without Provoked Vulvodynia.

Ghizzani A, Di Sabatino V, Suman AL, Biasi G, Santarcangelo EL, Carli G - Pain Res Treat (2014)

Distribution of total vulvar pain intensity scores in all groups. Note the overlap of FMS and FMS + PVD scores. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927857&req=5

fig2: Distribution of total vulvar pain intensity scores in all groups. Note the overlap of FMS and FMS + PVD scores. Abbreviations as in Figure 1.
Mentions: The mean Q-tip pain intensity score (Figure 1(b)) was significantly different between FMS and FMS + PVD (t(1,37) = 2.832, P < 0.008), FMS + PVD and Controls (t(1,55) = 10.599, P < 0.0001), and FMS and Controls (t(1,52) = 5.877, P < 0.001). Figure 2 shows the distribution of the total pain intensity scores of the 3 groups (FMS + PVD > C, t(1,55) = 12.586, P < 0.0001); FMS > C, (t(1,52) = 7.394, P < 0.0001); FMS + PVD > FMS, t(1,37) = 3.666, P < 0.001).

Bottom Line: The vulvar excitability was significantly higher in FMS+PVD than in FMS and in both groups than in Controls.Conclusions.Results suggest that coital pain develops in patients with higher FMS symptoms severity due to the cooperative effects of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Medicine and Development, Siena University Hospital, 53100 Siena, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Objective. The aim of the study was to compare the pain symptoms of fibromyalgia patients exhibiting (FMS+PVD) and not exhibiting (FMS) comorbidity with provoked vulvodynia. Study Design. The case control study was performed in 39 patients who had been diagnosed with FMS and accepted to undergo gynaecological examination and in 36 healthy women (C). All patients completed standardized questionnaires for pain intensity, pain area, and psychological functioning. The gynaecological examination included vulvar pain pressure reactivity (Q-tip), pelvic tone assessment (Kegel manoeuver), and a semistructured interview collecting detailed information about pelvic symptoms and sexual function. Results. FMS+PVD patients displayed a higher number of associated symptoms than FMS patients. The vulvar excitability was significantly higher in FMS+PVD than in FMS and in both groups than in Controls. Half of FMS+PVD patients were positive to Kegel manoeuver and displayed higher scores in widespread pain intensity, STAI-Y2, and CESD levels than Kegel negative patients. Conclusions. The study reveals that increased vulvar pain excitability may occur in FMS patients independently of the presence of coital pain. Results suggest that coital pain develops in patients with higher FMS symptoms severity due to the cooperative effects of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus