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Association between Information and Communication Technology Usage and the Quality of Sleep among School-Aged Children during a School Week.

Ononogbu S, Wallenius M, Punamäki RL, Saarni L, Lindholm H, Nygård CH - Sleep Disord (2014)

Bottom Line: Conclusion.The intensive ICT use was associated with poorer quality of sleep indicated by physiological measures among children and adolescents.Knowing the crucial role of healthy sleep in this age, the results are reason for concern.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Medisiinarinkatu 3, 33014 Tampere, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Objective. To determine the association between intensity of information and communication technology (ICT) usage and quality of sleep in school-aged children during a school week. Methods. In all 61 subjects, 10-14 years of age, a quasiexperimental laboratory study where criterions for inclusion were absence of prior medical condition and duration of ICT use. A portable device (Holter monitor) was used to measure heart rate variability (HRV) over a 24-hour period, while activity diary was used to record in 15-minute intervals ICT use and sleep and wake up time. Low and high ICT user groups were formed according to their intensity of ICT use. Statistical analysis was done with two independent samples tests and factorial ANCOVA. Results. The higher ICT users showed a lower sleep time standard deviation of normal to normal interval (SDNN) measures in comparison to the low ICT users. Conclusion. The intensive ICT use was associated with poorer quality of sleep indicated by physiological measures among children and adolescents. Knowing the crucial role of healthy sleep in this age, the results are reason for concern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean HRV (rMSSD, ms) during a school day and at night.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Mean HRV (rMSSD, ms) during a school day and at night.

Mentions: The mean sleep time blood pressure did not differ between the ICT user groups. However, there was a statistically significant difference in HRV between the ICT user groups, when assessed with mean sleep time SDNN (P = 0.035) (Table 2). Comparison of the mean day and night HRV values between the ICT user groups revealed lower night values, especially in older (13-14 years) high ICT users. Nevertheless, analysis with rMSSD (P = 0.07) showed no statistically significant difference between the groups. HRV sleep period rose slower in high ICT users in both age groups compared to low ICT users (Figures 1 and 2). Adjustment for the influence of body mass index, gender, and age with factoral ANOVA resulted in no significant effect on the outcome (Table 3).


Association between Information and Communication Technology Usage and the Quality of Sleep among School-Aged Children during a School Week.

Ononogbu S, Wallenius M, Punamäki RL, Saarni L, Lindholm H, Nygård CH - Sleep Disord (2014)

Mean HRV (rMSSD, ms) during a school day and at night.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927848&req=5

fig2: Mean HRV (rMSSD, ms) during a school day and at night.
Mentions: The mean sleep time blood pressure did not differ between the ICT user groups. However, there was a statistically significant difference in HRV between the ICT user groups, when assessed with mean sleep time SDNN (P = 0.035) (Table 2). Comparison of the mean day and night HRV values between the ICT user groups revealed lower night values, especially in older (13-14 years) high ICT users. Nevertheless, analysis with rMSSD (P = 0.07) showed no statistically significant difference between the groups. HRV sleep period rose slower in high ICT users in both age groups compared to low ICT users (Figures 1 and 2). Adjustment for the influence of body mass index, gender, and age with factoral ANOVA resulted in no significant effect on the outcome (Table 3).

Bottom Line: Conclusion.The intensive ICT use was associated with poorer quality of sleep indicated by physiological measures among children and adolescents.Knowing the crucial role of healthy sleep in this age, the results are reason for concern.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Medisiinarinkatu 3, 33014 Tampere, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Objective. To determine the association between intensity of information and communication technology (ICT) usage and quality of sleep in school-aged children during a school week. Methods. In all 61 subjects, 10-14 years of age, a quasiexperimental laboratory study where criterions for inclusion were absence of prior medical condition and duration of ICT use. A portable device (Holter monitor) was used to measure heart rate variability (HRV) over a 24-hour period, while activity diary was used to record in 15-minute intervals ICT use and sleep and wake up time. Low and high ICT user groups were formed according to their intensity of ICT use. Statistical analysis was done with two independent samples tests and factorial ANCOVA. Results. The higher ICT users showed a lower sleep time standard deviation of normal to normal interval (SDNN) measures in comparison to the low ICT users. Conclusion. The intensive ICT use was associated with poorer quality of sleep indicated by physiological measures among children and adolescents. Knowing the crucial role of healthy sleep in this age, the results are reason for concern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus