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Secular changes in at-risk drinking in Sweden: birth cohort comparisons in 75-year-old men and women 1976-2006.

Waern M, Marlow T, Morin J, Ostling S, Skoog I - Age Ageing (2013)

Bottom Line: Total weekly alcohol intake was estimated and at-risk drinking was defined as ≥100 g alcohol/week. the proportion abstaining differed significantly between birth cohorts (18% in 1976-77 versus 9% in 2005, P < 0.001).Corresponding figures for women were 0.6 and 10.4% (P < 0.001).At-risk drinking was significantly associated with birth cohort in women (OR: 13.77, CI: 1.82-104.0, P = 0.011) and the occupational group in men (OR: 1.60, CI: 1.13-2.26, P = 0.008). alcohol consumption in 75-year-olds has changed markedly, especially in women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: little is known about the prevalence of at-risk drinking in older adults.

Objective: to compare rates of at-risk drinking in 75-year-olds examined in 1976-77 and in 2005-06.

Design: cross-sectional survey.

Setting: two samples representative of the general population in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Participants: 75-year-olds born in 1901-02 (n = 303) and in 1930 (n = 753).

Methods: participants took part in a multidisciplinary study on health and ageing. Protocols regarding alcohol consumption were identical for both cohorts. Total weekly alcohol intake was estimated and at-risk drinking was defined as ≥100 g alcohol/week.

Results: the proportion abstaining differed significantly between birth cohorts (18% in 1976-77 versus 9% in 2005, P < 0.001). Frequencies of drinking beer and liquor were similar in the two cohorts for men, but were lower for women in the later-born cohort. Proportions drinking wine were higher in the later-born cohort for both sexes. Total weekly alcohol intake was higher for both men and women. At-risk drinking was observed in 19.3% of the men in the earlier-born cohort, and in 27.4% in the later-born cohort (P = 0.117). Corresponding figures for women were 0.6 and 10.4% (P < 0.001). At-risk drinking was significantly associated with birth cohort in women (OR: 13.77, CI: 1.82-104.0, P = 0.011) and the occupational group in men (OR: 1.60, CI: 1.13-2.26, P = 0.008).

Conclusions: alcohol consumption in 75-year-olds has changed markedly, especially in women. Studies need to be carried out in varied settings in order to evaluate the clinical and public health implications of changing trends in alcohol consumption.

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Alcohol consumption by sex and birth cohort (1901–02 birth cohort in white bars and 1930 birth cohort in dark grey bars).
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AFT136F1: Alcohol consumption by sex and birth cohort (1901–02 birth cohort in white bars and 1930 birth cohort in dark grey bars).

Mentions: Estimates of total weekly alcohol consumption are shown for men and women by birth cohort in Figure 1. In men, mean total weekly consumption was 56 g per week in the 1901 cohort and 81 g per week in the 1930 cohort (Mann–Whitney U = 12152, P = 0.004).For women the mean value changed from 14 to 39 g per week (Mann–Whitney U = 22900, P < 0.001). Figure 1 shows further that at-risk drinking was observed in 19.3% of the men in the earlier-born cohort, and in 27.4% in the latter-born cohort (P = 0.117). Corresponding figures for women were 0.6 and 10.4% (P < 0.001). A cohort difference in proportions with at-risk drinking was observed in women with manual occupations (0–7%, P = 0.002). Corresponding figures for the service/professional group were 2.8%–13.9%, P = 0.91. There were no significant cohort changes within occupational groups in men (results not shown).Figure 1.


Secular changes in at-risk drinking in Sweden: birth cohort comparisons in 75-year-old men and women 1976-2006.

Waern M, Marlow T, Morin J, Ostling S, Skoog I - Age Ageing (2013)

Alcohol consumption by sex and birth cohort (1901–02 birth cohort in white bars and 1930 birth cohort in dark grey bars).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927771&req=5

AFT136F1: Alcohol consumption by sex and birth cohort (1901–02 birth cohort in white bars and 1930 birth cohort in dark grey bars).
Mentions: Estimates of total weekly alcohol consumption are shown for men and women by birth cohort in Figure 1. In men, mean total weekly consumption was 56 g per week in the 1901 cohort and 81 g per week in the 1930 cohort (Mann–Whitney U = 12152, P = 0.004).For women the mean value changed from 14 to 39 g per week (Mann–Whitney U = 22900, P < 0.001). Figure 1 shows further that at-risk drinking was observed in 19.3% of the men in the earlier-born cohort, and in 27.4% in the latter-born cohort (P = 0.117). Corresponding figures for women were 0.6 and 10.4% (P < 0.001). A cohort difference in proportions with at-risk drinking was observed in women with manual occupations (0–7%, P = 0.002). Corresponding figures for the service/professional group were 2.8%–13.9%, P = 0.91. There were no significant cohort changes within occupational groups in men (results not shown).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Total weekly alcohol intake was estimated and at-risk drinking was defined as ≥100 g alcohol/week. the proportion abstaining differed significantly between birth cohorts (18% in 1976-77 versus 9% in 2005, P < 0.001).Corresponding figures for women were 0.6 and 10.4% (P < 0.001).At-risk drinking was significantly associated with birth cohort in women (OR: 13.77, CI: 1.82-104.0, P = 0.011) and the occupational group in men (OR: 1.60, CI: 1.13-2.26, P = 0.008). alcohol consumption in 75-year-olds has changed markedly, especially in women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: little is known about the prevalence of at-risk drinking in older adults.

Objective: to compare rates of at-risk drinking in 75-year-olds examined in 1976-77 and in 2005-06.

Design: cross-sectional survey.

Setting: two samples representative of the general population in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Participants: 75-year-olds born in 1901-02 (n = 303) and in 1930 (n = 753).

Methods: participants took part in a multidisciplinary study on health and ageing. Protocols regarding alcohol consumption were identical for both cohorts. Total weekly alcohol intake was estimated and at-risk drinking was defined as ≥100 g alcohol/week.

Results: the proportion abstaining differed significantly between birth cohorts (18% in 1976-77 versus 9% in 2005, P < 0.001). Frequencies of drinking beer and liquor were similar in the two cohorts for men, but were lower for women in the later-born cohort. Proportions drinking wine were higher in the later-born cohort for both sexes. Total weekly alcohol intake was higher for both men and women. At-risk drinking was observed in 19.3% of the men in the earlier-born cohort, and in 27.4% in the later-born cohort (P = 0.117). Corresponding figures for women were 0.6 and 10.4% (P < 0.001). At-risk drinking was significantly associated with birth cohort in women (OR: 13.77, CI: 1.82-104.0, P = 0.011) and the occupational group in men (OR: 1.60, CI: 1.13-2.26, P = 0.008).

Conclusions: alcohol consumption in 75-year-olds has changed markedly, especially in women. Studies need to be carried out in varied settings in order to evaluate the clinical and public health implications of changing trends in alcohol consumption.

Show MeSH