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The burden of hypertension and kidney disease in Northeast India: the Institute for Indian Mother and Child noncommunicable diseases project.

Gallieni M, Aiello A, Tucci B, Sala V, Brahmochary Mandal SK, Doneda A, Genovesi S - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Bottom Line: We summarize here results of the screening activities and the perspectives of a noncommunicable diseases project started in West Bengal, India, in collaboration with the Institute for Indian Mother and Child (IIMC), a nongovernmental voluntary organization committed to promoting child and maternal health.A glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min was found in 4.1% of adult subjects significantly higher than that of 0.8% to 1.4% reported 10 years ago.Increased awareness and intervention projects to identify NCDs and block their progression are necessary in all countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Graduate School of Nephrology, University of Milan, Via Pio II, 3-20153 Milano, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, obesity, and chronic kidney disease are the major cause of death not only in high income, but also in medium and low income countries. Hypertension and diabetes, the most common causes of chronic kidney disease, are particularly common in southeast Asian Countries. Because early intervention can markedly slow the progression of these two killer diseases, assessment of their presence through screening and intervention program is a priority. We summarize here results of the screening activities and the perspectives of a noncommunicable diseases project started in West Bengal, India, in collaboration with the Institute for Indian Mother and Child (IIMC), a nongovernmental voluntary organization committed to promoting child and maternal health. We started investigating hypertension and chronic kidney disease with screen in school-age children and in adults >30 years old. We found a remarkable prevalence of hypertension, even in underweight subjects, in both children and adult populations. A glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min was found in 4.1% of adult subjects significantly higher than that of 0.8% to 1.4% reported 10 years ago. Increased awareness and intervention projects to identify NCDs and block their progression are necessary in all countries.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Screening of women of childbearing age.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig4: Screening of women of childbearing age.

Mentions: The collaboration between the institutions that undertook the NCD studies in Kolkata is continuing. There is an ongoing project on the evaluation of hypertension and urinary abnormalities in women of childbearing age (Figure 4). Evaluation of body weight in very young children (less than 2 years old) is also ongoing to investigate the hypothesis of hypertension being influenced by low birth weight. Thus, optimization of maternal health and early childhood nutrition could reduce the global burden of hypertension and kidney disease in the future.


The burden of hypertension and kidney disease in Northeast India: the Institute for Indian Mother and Child noncommunicable diseases project.

Gallieni M, Aiello A, Tucci B, Sala V, Brahmochary Mandal SK, Doneda A, Genovesi S - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Screening of women of childbearing age.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927758&req=5

fig4: Screening of women of childbearing age.
Mentions: The collaboration between the institutions that undertook the NCD studies in Kolkata is continuing. There is an ongoing project on the evaluation of hypertension and urinary abnormalities in women of childbearing age (Figure 4). Evaluation of body weight in very young children (less than 2 years old) is also ongoing to investigate the hypothesis of hypertension being influenced by low birth weight. Thus, optimization of maternal health and early childhood nutrition could reduce the global burden of hypertension and kidney disease in the future.

Bottom Line: We summarize here results of the screening activities and the perspectives of a noncommunicable diseases project started in West Bengal, India, in collaboration with the Institute for Indian Mother and Child (IIMC), a nongovernmental voluntary organization committed to promoting child and maternal health.A glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min was found in 4.1% of adult subjects significantly higher than that of 0.8% to 1.4% reported 10 years ago.Increased awareness and intervention projects to identify NCDs and block their progression are necessary in all countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Graduate School of Nephrology, University of Milan, Via Pio II, 3-20153 Milano, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, obesity, and chronic kidney disease are the major cause of death not only in high income, but also in medium and low income countries. Hypertension and diabetes, the most common causes of chronic kidney disease, are particularly common in southeast Asian Countries. Because early intervention can markedly slow the progression of these two killer diseases, assessment of their presence through screening and intervention program is a priority. We summarize here results of the screening activities and the perspectives of a noncommunicable diseases project started in West Bengal, India, in collaboration with the Institute for Indian Mother and Child (IIMC), a nongovernmental voluntary organization committed to promoting child and maternal health. We started investigating hypertension and chronic kidney disease with screen in school-age children and in adults >30 years old. We found a remarkable prevalence of hypertension, even in underweight subjects, in both children and adult populations. A glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min was found in 4.1% of adult subjects significantly higher than that of 0.8% to 1.4% reported 10 years ago. Increased awareness and intervention projects to identify NCDs and block their progression are necessary in all countries.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus