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Mortality in levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease.

Morgan JC, Currie LJ, Harrison MB, Bennett JP, Trugman JM, Wooten GF - Parkinsons Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: Our findings confirm that PD is associated with increased mortality in both men and women.Unlike the majority of other mortality studies, we found that women have a greater reduction in lifespan compared to men.We also found that patients with early onset PD (onset at the age of 50 or before) have reduced survival relative to PD patients with later ages of onset.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Movement Disorders Program, Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, 1429 Harper Street HF-1154, Augusta, GA 30912, USA.

ABSTRACT
Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with increased mortality despite many advances in treatment. Following the introduction of levodopa in the late 1960's, many studies reported improved or normalized mortality rates in PD. Despite the remarkable symptomatic benefits provided by levodopa, multiple recent studies have demonstrated that PD patients continue to die at a rate in excess of their peers. We undertook this retrospective study of 211 deceased PD patients to determine the factors associated with mortality in levodopa-treated PD. Our findings confirm that PD is associated with increased mortality in both men and women. Unlike the majority of other mortality studies, we found that women have a greater reduction in lifespan compared to men. We also found that patients with early onset PD (onset at the age of 50 or before) have reduced survival relative to PD patients with later ages of onset. A final important finding is that survival is equal in PD patients treated with levodopa early (within 2 years or less of PD onset) versus later.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plot comparing age of onset to disease duration for each PD patient in our sample. Earlier age of PD onset was associated with longer disease duration in our sample as indicated by the trendline.
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fig3: Scatter plot comparing age of onset to disease duration for each PD patient in our sample. Earlier age of PD onset was associated with longer disease duration in our sample as indicated by the trendline.

Mentions: Early age of onset (defined as PD onset at age 50 or earlier) was associated with longer disease duration in our sample (Figure 3). Patients with early age of onset (n = 29) were 12 years younger at death (65 ± 8 versus 77 ± 6, P < 0.001) and had a longer disease duration (20 ± 8 versus 11 ± 6, P < 0.001) when compared to patients with onset after age 50 (n = 182). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed markedly reduced survival in early onset patients compared to patients with ages of onset after the age of 50 (Figure 4). Mortality ratios were 3.58 and 2.57, respectively, for the 29 patients with early PD onset versus the 182 patients with PD onset after the age of 50.


Mortality in levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease.

Morgan JC, Currie LJ, Harrison MB, Bennett JP, Trugman JM, Wooten GF - Parkinsons Dis (2014)

Scatter plot comparing age of onset to disease duration for each PD patient in our sample. Earlier age of PD onset was associated with longer disease duration in our sample as indicated by the trendline.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927757&req=5

fig3: Scatter plot comparing age of onset to disease duration for each PD patient in our sample. Earlier age of PD onset was associated with longer disease duration in our sample as indicated by the trendline.
Mentions: Early age of onset (defined as PD onset at age 50 or earlier) was associated with longer disease duration in our sample (Figure 3). Patients with early age of onset (n = 29) were 12 years younger at death (65 ± 8 versus 77 ± 6, P < 0.001) and had a longer disease duration (20 ± 8 versus 11 ± 6, P < 0.001) when compared to patients with onset after age 50 (n = 182). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed markedly reduced survival in early onset patients compared to patients with ages of onset after the age of 50 (Figure 4). Mortality ratios were 3.58 and 2.57, respectively, for the 29 patients with early PD onset versus the 182 patients with PD onset after the age of 50.

Bottom Line: Our findings confirm that PD is associated with increased mortality in both men and women.Unlike the majority of other mortality studies, we found that women have a greater reduction in lifespan compared to men.We also found that patients with early onset PD (onset at the age of 50 or before) have reduced survival relative to PD patients with later ages of onset.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Movement Disorders Program, Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, 1429 Harper Street HF-1154, Augusta, GA 30912, USA.

ABSTRACT
Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with increased mortality despite many advances in treatment. Following the introduction of levodopa in the late 1960's, many studies reported improved or normalized mortality rates in PD. Despite the remarkable symptomatic benefits provided by levodopa, multiple recent studies have demonstrated that PD patients continue to die at a rate in excess of their peers. We undertook this retrospective study of 211 deceased PD patients to determine the factors associated with mortality in levodopa-treated PD. Our findings confirm that PD is associated with increased mortality in both men and women. Unlike the majority of other mortality studies, we found that women have a greater reduction in lifespan compared to men. We also found that patients with early onset PD (onset at the age of 50 or before) have reduced survival relative to PD patients with later ages of onset. A final important finding is that survival is equal in PD patients treated with levodopa early (within 2 years or less of PD onset) versus later.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus