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Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and susceptibility to prostate cancer in a colombian population.

Cano D, Gomez CF, Ospina N, Cajigas JA, Groot H, Andrade RE, Torres MM - ISRN Oncol (2014)

Bottom Line: According to the geographical origin attributed to each mtDNA haplogroup, 82% of the mtDNA sequences found in both groups were Native Americans (A, B, C, and D).A lower percentage of European haplogroups (U, H, K, J, M, T, and HV) were also found (13.1%CA-12.9%CG), likewise African haplogroups (L0, L1, L2, and L3) (6.5%CA-2.1%CG).There were no statistically significant differences between the distribution of mtDNA haplogroups in CA and the CG in this study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Genetics Laboratory, Science Faculty, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.

ABSTRACT
Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers and the second leading cause of mortality from cancer in Colombian men. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups have been associated with the risk of PC. Several studies have demonstrated dramatic differences regarding the risk of PC among men from different ethnic backgrounds. The present study was aimed at assessing the relationship between mtDNA haplogroups and PC. The mitochondrial DNA hypervariable segment I (HSV-1) was sequenced in a population-based study covering 168 cases (CA) and 140 unrelated healthy individuals as a control group (CG). A total of 92 different mtDNA sequences were found in CA and 59 were found in the CG. According to the geographical origin attributed to each mtDNA haplogroup, 82% of the mtDNA sequences found in both groups were Native Americans (A, B, C, and D). The most frequent was A (41.1%CA-42.1%CG), followed by B (22.0%CA-21.4%CG), C (12.0%CA-11.4%CG), and D (6%CA-10.0%CG). A lower percentage of European haplogroups (U, H, K, J, M, T, and HV) were also found (13.1%CA-12.9%CG), likewise African haplogroups (L0, L1, L2, and L3) (6.5%CA-2.1%CG). There were no statistically significant differences between the distribution of mtDNA haplogroups in CA and the CG in this study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Network haplotype constructed by the Median-Joining method showing haplogroup distribution (light colors represent control patients, while dark ones represent cases).
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fig1: Network haplotype constructed by the Median-Joining method showing haplogroup distribution (light colors represent control patients, while dark ones represent cases).

Mentions: Ninety-two different haplotypes were identified in the group of patients (168) which showed 90 polymorphic sites. Fifty-nine different haplotypes were found in the control group (140) in which 67 polymorphic sites were observed; 17 haplotypes were shared in the cases and 10 in the control group (Table 2). A haplotype network was constructed using the Median-Joining method (Figure 1) with all the haplotypes from both the patients and control group to establish relationships between HSV-1 region sequences and identify distinctive haplogroups according to their mutations shared by clades. The network arrangement showed four groups featuring Amerindian haplogroups, A2, B2, C1, and D1. European-origin sequences (U, H, HV, M, and T) were also found in a group more closely related to the revised reference sequence (CRS-Anderson). Some sequences had many mutations which generated outstanding long branches that were subsequently identified as belonging to African haplogroups (L). The different literature references [42] were used for assigning haplogroups to find their characteristic mutations; the diagnostic position for each haplogroup is shown in Table 2.


Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and susceptibility to prostate cancer in a colombian population.

Cano D, Gomez CF, Ospina N, Cajigas JA, Groot H, Andrade RE, Torres MM - ISRN Oncol (2014)

Network haplotype constructed by the Median-Joining method showing haplogroup distribution (light colors represent control patients, while dark ones represent cases).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927756&req=5

fig1: Network haplotype constructed by the Median-Joining method showing haplogroup distribution (light colors represent control patients, while dark ones represent cases).
Mentions: Ninety-two different haplotypes were identified in the group of patients (168) which showed 90 polymorphic sites. Fifty-nine different haplotypes were found in the control group (140) in which 67 polymorphic sites were observed; 17 haplotypes were shared in the cases and 10 in the control group (Table 2). A haplotype network was constructed using the Median-Joining method (Figure 1) with all the haplotypes from both the patients and control group to establish relationships between HSV-1 region sequences and identify distinctive haplogroups according to their mutations shared by clades. The network arrangement showed four groups featuring Amerindian haplogroups, A2, B2, C1, and D1. European-origin sequences (U, H, HV, M, and T) were also found in a group more closely related to the revised reference sequence (CRS-Anderson). Some sequences had many mutations which generated outstanding long branches that were subsequently identified as belonging to African haplogroups (L). The different literature references [42] were used for assigning haplogroups to find their characteristic mutations; the diagnostic position for each haplogroup is shown in Table 2.

Bottom Line: According to the geographical origin attributed to each mtDNA haplogroup, 82% of the mtDNA sequences found in both groups were Native Americans (A, B, C, and D).A lower percentage of European haplogroups (U, H, K, J, M, T, and HV) were also found (13.1%CA-12.9%CG), likewise African haplogroups (L0, L1, L2, and L3) (6.5%CA-2.1%CG).There were no statistically significant differences between the distribution of mtDNA haplogroups in CA and the CG in this study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Genetics Laboratory, Science Faculty, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.

ABSTRACT
Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers and the second leading cause of mortality from cancer in Colombian men. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups have been associated with the risk of PC. Several studies have demonstrated dramatic differences regarding the risk of PC among men from different ethnic backgrounds. The present study was aimed at assessing the relationship between mtDNA haplogroups and PC. The mitochondrial DNA hypervariable segment I (HSV-1) was sequenced in a population-based study covering 168 cases (CA) and 140 unrelated healthy individuals as a control group (CG). A total of 92 different mtDNA sequences were found in CA and 59 were found in the CG. According to the geographical origin attributed to each mtDNA haplogroup, 82% of the mtDNA sequences found in both groups were Native Americans (A, B, C, and D). The most frequent was A (41.1%CA-42.1%CG), followed by B (22.0%CA-21.4%CG), C (12.0%CA-11.4%CG), and D (6%CA-10.0%CG). A lower percentage of European haplogroups (U, H, K, J, M, T, and HV) were also found (13.1%CA-12.9%CG), likewise African haplogroups (L0, L1, L2, and L3) (6.5%CA-2.1%CG). There were no statistically significant differences between the distribution of mtDNA haplogroups in CA and the CG in this study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus