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Porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold promotes full-thickness wound healing in rabbit.

Revi D, Vineetha VP, Muhamed J, Rajan A, Anilkumar TV - J Tissue Eng (2013)

Bottom Line: This study evaluated the properties of porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold and its use for treating full-thickness skin wound in rabbit.Compared to a commercially available skin-graft substitute made of porcine small intestinal submucosa, the cholecyst-derived scaffold was rich in natural biomolecules like elastin and glycosaminoglycans.When used as a xenograft, it promoted healing with excess cell proliferation at early phases and acceptable collagen deposition in the later remodelling phases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Experimental Pathology Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, India.

ABSTRACT
Graft-assisted healing is an important strategy for treating full-thickness skin wounds. This study evaluated the properties of porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold and its use for treating full-thickness skin wound in rabbit. The physical properties of cholecyst-derived scaffold were congenial for skin-graft application. Compared to a commercially available skin-graft substitute made of porcine small intestinal submucosa, the cholecyst-derived scaffold was rich in natural biomolecules like elastin and glycosaminoglycans. When used as a xenograft, it promoted healing with excess cell proliferation at early phases and acceptable collagen deposition in the later remodelling phases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Van Gieson staining of (a and b) CDS-grafted wound and (c and d) SIS-grafted wound on 7th (a and c) and 30th day (b and d). Note that the elastin deposition (black fibres) increased on 30th day (b and d) in both CDS- and SIS-grafted wounds. Please see Figure 12(b) for quantitative data.CDS: cholecyst-derived scaffold; SIS: small intestinal submucosa.
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fig10-2041731413518060: Van Gieson staining of (a and b) CDS-grafted wound and (c and d) SIS-grafted wound on 7th (a and c) and 30th day (b and d). Note that the elastin deposition (black fibres) increased on 30th day (b and d) in both CDS- and SIS-grafted wounds. Please see Figure 12(b) for quantitative data.CDS: cholecyst-derived scaffold; SIS: small intestinal submucosa.

Mentions: Histomorphologic signs of healing were present as early as third day and progressed to complete healing by re-epithelisation and granulation tissue formation in both CDS and SIS-grafted wounds (Figure 3). Briefly, the changes appreciated on earlier time points (3 and 7 days) were related to the proliferation (regeneration) phase, but later observations (14 and 30 days) were indicative of remodelling phase of the wound healing process. Scattered inflammatory cells were seen in histology slides made from early time points (3 and 7 days) but were minimal in later time points. The extent of cell proliferation and the process of re-epithelialisation were apparent with the abundance of PCNA-positive cells (Figure 4) and cytokeratin-positive cells in the epidermis (Figure 5). There was also an increase in the number of proliferating cells in the dermis (Figure 4), and the dermis was thickly populated by mesenchymal cells (Figure 6) and myofibroblasts (Figure 7) as identified by IHC for vimentin and ASMA intermediate filament proteins. The nature of angiogenesis (Figure 3) and collagen deposition (Figure 8) contributing for the granulation tissue formation were evident in the dermis in all phases of healing. The Herovici staining (Figure 9) and Van Gieson staining (Figure 10) reactions revealed the relative proportion and distribution of type I and type III collagen during the healing process. The quantitative data (Figures 11 and 12) were used for objective evaluation of the histomorphology results as described below.


Porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold promotes full-thickness wound healing in rabbit.

Revi D, Vineetha VP, Muhamed J, Rajan A, Anilkumar TV - J Tissue Eng (2013)

Van Gieson staining of (a and b) CDS-grafted wound and (c and d) SIS-grafted wound on 7th (a and c) and 30th day (b and d). Note that the elastin deposition (black fibres) increased on 30th day (b and d) in both CDS- and SIS-grafted wounds. Please see Figure 12(b) for quantitative data.CDS: cholecyst-derived scaffold; SIS: small intestinal submucosa.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927752&req=5

fig10-2041731413518060: Van Gieson staining of (a and b) CDS-grafted wound and (c and d) SIS-grafted wound on 7th (a and c) and 30th day (b and d). Note that the elastin deposition (black fibres) increased on 30th day (b and d) in both CDS- and SIS-grafted wounds. Please see Figure 12(b) for quantitative data.CDS: cholecyst-derived scaffold; SIS: small intestinal submucosa.
Mentions: Histomorphologic signs of healing were present as early as third day and progressed to complete healing by re-epithelisation and granulation tissue formation in both CDS and SIS-grafted wounds (Figure 3). Briefly, the changes appreciated on earlier time points (3 and 7 days) were related to the proliferation (regeneration) phase, but later observations (14 and 30 days) were indicative of remodelling phase of the wound healing process. Scattered inflammatory cells were seen in histology slides made from early time points (3 and 7 days) but were minimal in later time points. The extent of cell proliferation and the process of re-epithelialisation were apparent with the abundance of PCNA-positive cells (Figure 4) and cytokeratin-positive cells in the epidermis (Figure 5). There was also an increase in the number of proliferating cells in the dermis (Figure 4), and the dermis was thickly populated by mesenchymal cells (Figure 6) and myofibroblasts (Figure 7) as identified by IHC for vimentin and ASMA intermediate filament proteins. The nature of angiogenesis (Figure 3) and collagen deposition (Figure 8) contributing for the granulation tissue formation were evident in the dermis in all phases of healing. The Herovici staining (Figure 9) and Van Gieson staining (Figure 10) reactions revealed the relative proportion and distribution of type I and type III collagen during the healing process. The quantitative data (Figures 11 and 12) were used for objective evaluation of the histomorphology results as described below.

Bottom Line: This study evaluated the properties of porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold and its use for treating full-thickness skin wound in rabbit.Compared to a commercially available skin-graft substitute made of porcine small intestinal submucosa, the cholecyst-derived scaffold was rich in natural biomolecules like elastin and glycosaminoglycans.When used as a xenograft, it promoted healing with excess cell proliferation at early phases and acceptable collagen deposition in the later remodelling phases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Experimental Pathology Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, India.

ABSTRACT
Graft-assisted healing is an important strategy for treating full-thickness skin wounds. This study evaluated the properties of porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold and its use for treating full-thickness skin wound in rabbit. The physical properties of cholecyst-derived scaffold were congenial for skin-graft application. Compared to a commercially available skin-graft substitute made of porcine small intestinal submucosa, the cholecyst-derived scaffold was rich in natural biomolecules like elastin and glycosaminoglycans. When used as a xenograft, it promoted healing with excess cell proliferation at early phases and acceptable collagen deposition in the later remodelling phases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus