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Porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold promotes full-thickness wound healing in rabbit.

Revi D, Vineetha VP, Muhamed J, Rajan A, Anilkumar TV - J Tissue Eng (2013)

Bottom Line: This study evaluated the properties of porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold and its use for treating full-thickness skin wound in rabbit.Compared to a commercially available skin-graft substitute made of porcine small intestinal submucosa, the cholecyst-derived scaffold was rich in natural biomolecules like elastin and glycosaminoglycans.When used as a xenograft, it promoted healing with excess cell proliferation at early phases and acceptable collagen deposition in the later remodelling phases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Experimental Pathology Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, India.

ABSTRACT
Graft-assisted healing is an important strategy for treating full-thickness skin wounds. This study evaluated the properties of porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold and its use for treating full-thickness skin wound in rabbit. The physical properties of cholecyst-derived scaffold were congenial for skin-graft application. Compared to a commercially available skin-graft substitute made of porcine small intestinal submucosa, the cholecyst-derived scaffold was rich in natural biomolecules like elastin and glycosaminoglycans. When used as a xenograft, it promoted healing with excess cell proliferation at early phases and acceptable collagen deposition in the later remodelling phases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Physical properties of the scaffold: (a) moisture content, (b) fluid uptake, (c) evaporative water loss (EWL), (d) water vapour transmission rate (WVTR), (e) flexural rigidity and (f) suture retention strength. The CDSs have lower WVTR (p value = 0.001) and suture retention strength (p value = 0.003) than SIS.CDS: cholecyst-derived scaffold; SIS: small intestinal submucosa.
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fig1-2041731413518060: Physical properties of the scaffold: (a) moisture content, (b) fluid uptake, (c) evaporative water loss (EWL), (d) water vapour transmission rate (WVTR), (e) flexural rigidity and (f) suture retention strength. The CDSs have lower WVTR (p value = 0.001) and suture retention strength (p value = 0.003) than SIS.CDS: cholecyst-derived scaffold; SIS: small intestinal submucosa.

Mentions: The moisture content (Figure 1(a)), the fluid uptake (Figure 1(b)) and EWL (Figure 1(c)) in CDS were similar to that of SIS. But the WVTR (Figure 1(d)) of CDS was significantly lower (p value = 0.001) compared to SIS.


Porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold promotes full-thickness wound healing in rabbit.

Revi D, Vineetha VP, Muhamed J, Rajan A, Anilkumar TV - J Tissue Eng (2013)

Physical properties of the scaffold: (a) moisture content, (b) fluid uptake, (c) evaporative water loss (EWL), (d) water vapour transmission rate (WVTR), (e) flexural rigidity and (f) suture retention strength. The CDSs have lower WVTR (p value = 0.001) and suture retention strength (p value = 0.003) than SIS.CDS: cholecyst-derived scaffold; SIS: small intestinal submucosa.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927752&req=5

fig1-2041731413518060: Physical properties of the scaffold: (a) moisture content, (b) fluid uptake, (c) evaporative water loss (EWL), (d) water vapour transmission rate (WVTR), (e) flexural rigidity and (f) suture retention strength. The CDSs have lower WVTR (p value = 0.001) and suture retention strength (p value = 0.003) than SIS.CDS: cholecyst-derived scaffold; SIS: small intestinal submucosa.
Mentions: The moisture content (Figure 1(a)), the fluid uptake (Figure 1(b)) and EWL (Figure 1(c)) in CDS were similar to that of SIS. But the WVTR (Figure 1(d)) of CDS was significantly lower (p value = 0.001) compared to SIS.

Bottom Line: This study evaluated the properties of porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold and its use for treating full-thickness skin wound in rabbit.Compared to a commercially available skin-graft substitute made of porcine small intestinal submucosa, the cholecyst-derived scaffold was rich in natural biomolecules like elastin and glycosaminoglycans.When used as a xenograft, it promoted healing with excess cell proliferation at early phases and acceptable collagen deposition in the later remodelling phases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Experimental Pathology Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, India.

ABSTRACT
Graft-assisted healing is an important strategy for treating full-thickness skin wounds. This study evaluated the properties of porcine cholecyst-derived scaffold and its use for treating full-thickness skin wound in rabbit. The physical properties of cholecyst-derived scaffold were congenial for skin-graft application. Compared to a commercially available skin-graft substitute made of porcine small intestinal submucosa, the cholecyst-derived scaffold was rich in natural biomolecules like elastin and glycosaminoglycans. When used as a xenograft, it promoted healing with excess cell proliferation at early phases and acceptable collagen deposition in the later remodelling phases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus