Limits...
Dynein, microtubule and cargo: a ménage à trois.

Pavin N, Tolić-Nørrelykke IM - Biochem. Soc. Trans. (2013)

Bottom Line: To exert forces, motor proteins bind with one end to cytoskeletal filaments, such as microtubules and actin, and with the other end to the cell cortex, a vesicle or another motor.A general question is how motors search for sites in the cell where both motor ends can bind to their respective binding partners.We discuss how dynein targets sites where it can exert a pulling force on the microtubule to transport cargo inside the cell.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: *Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10002 Zagreb, Croatia.

ABSTRACT
To exert forces, motor proteins bind with one end to cytoskeletal filaments, such as microtubules and actin, and with the other end to the cell cortex, a vesicle or another motor. A general question is how motors search for sites in the cell where both motor ends can bind to their respective binding partners. In the present review, we focus on cytoplasmic dynein, which is required for a myriad of cellular functions in interphase, mitosis and meiosis, ranging from transport of organelles and functioning of the mitotic spindle to chromosome movements in meiotic prophase. We discuss how dynein targets sites where it can exert a pulling force on the microtubule to transport cargo inside the cell.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Two targeting mechanisms of dyneinDynein (magenta) from the cytoplasm (grey background) binds first either to the cargo (grey sphere) or to the microtubule (green), as shown by the upper and the lower pathway respectively. Subsequently, dynein also binds the other binding partner, and starts to perform its function in the cell.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927719&req=5

Figure 2: Two targeting mechanisms of dyneinDynein (magenta) from the cytoplasm (grey background) binds first either to the cargo (grey sphere) or to the microtubule (green), as shown by the upper and the lower pathway respectively. Subsequently, dynein also binds the other binding partner, and starts to perform its function in the cell.

Mentions: To exert forces, dynein binds to two partners: with the head domain to the microtubule and with the tail domain to the cell cortex or cargo. To understand how dynein performs its function in the cell, one needs to consider how dynein targets sites where it can bind simultaneously to a microtubule and to the cargo (Figure 2). This process can occur in two ways: dynein from the cytoplasm binds first either to the microtubule or to the cargo, and subsequently to the other binding partner.


Dynein, microtubule and cargo: a ménage à trois.

Pavin N, Tolić-Nørrelykke IM - Biochem. Soc. Trans. (2013)

Two targeting mechanisms of dyneinDynein (magenta) from the cytoplasm (grey background) binds first either to the cargo (grey sphere) or to the microtubule (green), as shown by the upper and the lower pathway respectively. Subsequently, dynein also binds the other binding partner, and starts to perform its function in the cell.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927719&req=5

Figure 2: Two targeting mechanisms of dyneinDynein (magenta) from the cytoplasm (grey background) binds first either to the cargo (grey sphere) or to the microtubule (green), as shown by the upper and the lower pathway respectively. Subsequently, dynein also binds the other binding partner, and starts to perform its function in the cell.
Mentions: To exert forces, dynein binds to two partners: with the head domain to the microtubule and with the tail domain to the cell cortex or cargo. To understand how dynein performs its function in the cell, one needs to consider how dynein targets sites where it can bind simultaneously to a microtubule and to the cargo (Figure 2). This process can occur in two ways: dynein from the cytoplasm binds first either to the microtubule or to the cargo, and subsequently to the other binding partner.

Bottom Line: To exert forces, motor proteins bind with one end to cytoskeletal filaments, such as microtubules and actin, and with the other end to the cell cortex, a vesicle or another motor.A general question is how motors search for sites in the cell where both motor ends can bind to their respective binding partners.We discuss how dynein targets sites where it can exert a pulling force on the microtubule to transport cargo inside the cell.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: *Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10002 Zagreb, Croatia.

ABSTRACT
To exert forces, motor proteins bind with one end to cytoskeletal filaments, such as microtubules and actin, and with the other end to the cell cortex, a vesicle or another motor. A general question is how motors search for sites in the cell where both motor ends can bind to their respective binding partners. In the present review, we focus on cytoplasmic dynein, which is required for a myriad of cellular functions in interphase, mitosis and meiosis, ranging from transport of organelles and functioning of the mitotic spindle to chromosome movements in meiotic prophase. We discuss how dynein targets sites where it can exert a pulling force on the microtubule to transport cargo inside the cell.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus