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Mild reproductive effects of the Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom in rats.

Dorce AL, Dorce VA, Nencioni AL - J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: Weight gains in fetuses and placentas were observed in the GD5 and GD10 groups.Weights of the heart and lungs were elevated in GD5 and GD10 and liver weight in GD10.However, these are preliminary results whose causes should be investigated more carefully in future studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Pharmacology, Butantan Institute, Avenue Dr, Vital Brasil, 1500, São Paulo, SP CEP 05503-900, Brazil. ana.nencioni@butantan.gov.br.

ABSTRACT

Background: Scorpion envenoming is a public health problem in Brazil, where Tityus serrulatus and T. bahiensis are considered the most dangerous scorpions. They are well adapted to urbanized environments, and there is an increasing probability of human exposure to these venoms, including during pregnancy. Not much is known about the effects of prenatal exposure to the venom, and no information is available to aid in the rational treatment of victims stung during pregnancy. Thus, this study aimed to investigate whether venom from the scorpion T. bahiensis administered once to pregnant female rats at a dose that causes a moderate envenomation may lead to deleterious effects on the reproductive performance of the dams and on the development of their offspring. This is the first work demonstrating that T. bahiensis venom, when administered experimentally to rats, alters maternal reproductive performance and the morphological development of fetuses. The venom was given to dams on the 5th (GD5) or on the 10th (GD10) gestational day. After laparotomy, on GD21, fetuses and placentas were counted, weighed and externally analyzed. The corpora lutea were counted. The sex and vitality of fetuses were evaluated, and each litter was then randomly divided for visceral or skeletal analyses. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Kramer test and Fisher's exact test. The significance level for all tests was set at p < 0.05.

Results: GD5 group presented an increased number of pre-implantation losses. Weight gains in fetuses and placentas were observed in the GD5 and GD10 groups. Weights of the heart and lungs were elevated in GD5 and GD10 and liver weight in GD10.

Conclusions: Moderate envenomation by T. bahiensis scorpion venom alters maternal reproductive performance and fetal development. However, these are preliminary results whose causes should be investigated more carefully in future studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Body weight gain (in grams) of dams treated with subcutaneous injection of 1.46% (w/v) NaCl (control group) or 2.5 mg/kg Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom on the 5th (GD5) and/or 10th (GD10) gestational day. Values represent the mean ± SEM.
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Figure 1: Body weight gain (in grams) of dams treated with subcutaneous injection of 1.46% (w/v) NaCl (control group) or 2.5 mg/kg Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom on the 5th (GD5) and/or 10th (GD10) gestational day. Values represent the mean ± SEM.

Mentions: Treatment with venom on GD5 or GD10 did not affect maternal body weight gain during gestation (p > 0.05 – Figure 1). Neither maternal deaths nor other signs of toxicity, such as differences in food and water intake, were induced in the rats (Table 1). The general state and activity did not change in the treated groups, except in the period after the injection. The length of gestation was not altered in the experimental groups (births were not anticipated). The number of fetuses per litter and the sex ratios of the litters were not significantly different between the control and experimental groups (p > 0.05 – Table 2). Dead fetuses were not detected (Table 2).


Mild reproductive effects of the Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom in rats.

Dorce AL, Dorce VA, Nencioni AL - J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis (2014)

Body weight gain (in grams) of dams treated with subcutaneous injection of 1.46% (w/v) NaCl (control group) or 2.5 mg/kg Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom on the 5th (GD5) and/or 10th (GD10) gestational day. Values represent the mean ± SEM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927621&req=5

Figure 1: Body weight gain (in grams) of dams treated with subcutaneous injection of 1.46% (w/v) NaCl (control group) or 2.5 mg/kg Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom on the 5th (GD5) and/or 10th (GD10) gestational day. Values represent the mean ± SEM.
Mentions: Treatment with venom on GD5 or GD10 did not affect maternal body weight gain during gestation (p > 0.05 – Figure 1). Neither maternal deaths nor other signs of toxicity, such as differences in food and water intake, were induced in the rats (Table 1). The general state and activity did not change in the treated groups, except in the period after the injection. The length of gestation was not altered in the experimental groups (births were not anticipated). The number of fetuses per litter and the sex ratios of the litters were not significantly different between the control and experimental groups (p > 0.05 – Table 2). Dead fetuses were not detected (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Weight gains in fetuses and placentas were observed in the GD5 and GD10 groups.Weights of the heart and lungs were elevated in GD5 and GD10 and liver weight in GD10.However, these are preliminary results whose causes should be investigated more carefully in future studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Pharmacology, Butantan Institute, Avenue Dr, Vital Brasil, 1500, São Paulo, SP CEP 05503-900, Brazil. ana.nencioni@butantan.gov.br.

ABSTRACT

Background: Scorpion envenoming is a public health problem in Brazil, where Tityus serrulatus and T. bahiensis are considered the most dangerous scorpions. They are well adapted to urbanized environments, and there is an increasing probability of human exposure to these venoms, including during pregnancy. Not much is known about the effects of prenatal exposure to the venom, and no information is available to aid in the rational treatment of victims stung during pregnancy. Thus, this study aimed to investigate whether venom from the scorpion T. bahiensis administered once to pregnant female rats at a dose that causes a moderate envenomation may lead to deleterious effects on the reproductive performance of the dams and on the development of their offspring. This is the first work demonstrating that T. bahiensis venom, when administered experimentally to rats, alters maternal reproductive performance and the morphological development of fetuses. The venom was given to dams on the 5th (GD5) or on the 10th (GD10) gestational day. After laparotomy, on GD21, fetuses and placentas were counted, weighed and externally analyzed. The corpora lutea were counted. The sex and vitality of fetuses were evaluated, and each litter was then randomly divided for visceral or skeletal analyses. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Kramer test and Fisher's exact test. The significance level for all tests was set at p < 0.05.

Results: GD5 group presented an increased number of pre-implantation losses. Weight gains in fetuses and placentas were observed in the GD5 and GD10 groups. Weights of the heart and lungs were elevated in GD5 and GD10 and liver weight in GD10.

Conclusions: Moderate envenomation by T. bahiensis scorpion venom alters maternal reproductive performance and fetal development. However, these are preliminary results whose causes should be investigated more carefully in future studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus