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Genes Involved in the Production of Antimetabolite Toxins by Pseudomonas syringae Pathovars.

Arrebola E, Cazorla FM, Pérez-García A, Vicente Ad - Genes (Basel) (2011)

Bottom Line: The antimetabolite toxins are generally located in gene clusters present in the flexible genomes of specific strains.These gene clusters are typically present in blocks of genes that appear to be integrated into specific sites in the P. syringae core genome.A general overview of the genetic organization and biosynthetic and regulatory functions of these genetic traits of the antimetabolite toxins will be given in the present work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental Station La Mayora, Institute of Subtropical Horticulture and Mediterranean "La Mayora" (IHSM-UMA-CSIC), Algarrobo-Costa (Málaga) 29750, Spain. arrebolad@eelm.csic.es.

ABSTRACT
Pseudomonas syringae is pathogenic in a wide variety of plants, causing diseases with economic impacts. Pseudomonas syringae pathovars produce several toxins that can function as virulence factors and contribute to disease symptoms. These virulence factors include antimetabolite toxins, such as tabtoxin, phaseolotoxin and mangotoxin, which target enzymes in the pathways of amino acid metabolism. The antimetabolite toxins are generally located in gene clusters present in the flexible genomes of specific strains. These gene clusters are typically present in blocks of genes that appear to be integrated into specific sites in the P. syringae core genome. A general overview of the genetic organization and biosynthetic and regulatory functions of these genetic traits of the antimetabolite toxins will be given in the present work.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structure of phaseolotoxin.
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f4-genes-02-00640: Chemical structure of phaseolotoxin.

Mentions: Phaseolotoxin is a phytotoxic tripeptide consisting of ornithine, alanine and homoarginine that is linked to an inorganic sulfodiaminophosphinyl moiety (Figure 4) [16,39]. Phaseolotoxin is produced at relatively low temperatures (18 to 22 °C) by Pseudomonas syringae pvs. phaseolicola and actinidiae, pathogens causing halo blight in beans and canker in kiwi fruit, respectively. It is also produced by P. syringae pv. syringae CFBP3388 [40]. Phaseolotoxin can be cleft by peptidases and can liberate sulfodiaminophosphinyl ornithine (Psorn, also called octicidine [39]), the irreversible inhibitor of ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT), an enzyme that catalyses the conversion of ornithine to citruline.


Genes Involved in the Production of Antimetabolite Toxins by Pseudomonas syringae Pathovars.

Arrebola E, Cazorla FM, Pérez-García A, Vicente Ad - Genes (Basel) (2011)

Chemical structure of phaseolotoxin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927611&req=5

f4-genes-02-00640: Chemical structure of phaseolotoxin.
Mentions: Phaseolotoxin is a phytotoxic tripeptide consisting of ornithine, alanine and homoarginine that is linked to an inorganic sulfodiaminophosphinyl moiety (Figure 4) [16,39]. Phaseolotoxin is produced at relatively low temperatures (18 to 22 °C) by Pseudomonas syringae pvs. phaseolicola and actinidiae, pathogens causing halo blight in beans and canker in kiwi fruit, respectively. It is also produced by P. syringae pv. syringae CFBP3388 [40]. Phaseolotoxin can be cleft by peptidases and can liberate sulfodiaminophosphinyl ornithine (Psorn, also called octicidine [39]), the irreversible inhibitor of ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT), an enzyme that catalyses the conversion of ornithine to citruline.

Bottom Line: The antimetabolite toxins are generally located in gene clusters present in the flexible genomes of specific strains.These gene clusters are typically present in blocks of genes that appear to be integrated into specific sites in the P. syringae core genome.A general overview of the genetic organization and biosynthetic and regulatory functions of these genetic traits of the antimetabolite toxins will be given in the present work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental Station La Mayora, Institute of Subtropical Horticulture and Mediterranean "La Mayora" (IHSM-UMA-CSIC), Algarrobo-Costa (Málaga) 29750, Spain. arrebolad@eelm.csic.es.

ABSTRACT
Pseudomonas syringae is pathogenic in a wide variety of plants, causing diseases with economic impacts. Pseudomonas syringae pathovars produce several toxins that can function as virulence factors and contribute to disease symptoms. These virulence factors include antimetabolite toxins, such as tabtoxin, phaseolotoxin and mangotoxin, which target enzymes in the pathways of amino acid metabolism. The antimetabolite toxins are generally located in gene clusters present in the flexible genomes of specific strains. These gene clusters are typically present in blocks of genes that appear to be integrated into specific sites in the P. syringae core genome. A general overview of the genetic organization and biosynthetic and regulatory functions of these genetic traits of the antimetabolite toxins will be given in the present work.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus