Limits...
Antifragility and Tinkering in Biology (and in Business) Flexibility Provides an Efficient Epigenetic Way to Manage Risk.

Danchin A, Binder PM, Noria S - Genes (Basel) (2011)

Bottom Line: In this ubiquitous process, an original entity, challenged by an ever-changing environment, creates variants that evolve into novel entities.One such example is proteins with flexible regions that can undergo functional alteration of their side residues or backbone and thus implement the tinkering that leads to antifragility.This in-built property of the cell chassis must be taken into account when considering construction of cell factories driven by engineering principles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: AMAbiotics SAS, CEA/Genoscope, 2 rue Gaston Crémieux, 91057 Evry Cedex, France. a.danchin@amabiotics.com.

ABSTRACT
The notion of antifragility, an attribute of systems that makes them thrive under variable conditions, has recently been proposed by Nassim Taleb in a business context. This idea requires the ability of such systems to 'tinker', i.e., to creatively respond to changes in their environment. A fairly obvious example of this is natural selection-driven evolution. In this ubiquitous process, an original entity, challenged by an ever-changing environment, creates variants that evolve into novel entities. Analyzing functions that are essential during stationary-state life yield examples of entities that may be antifragile. One such example is proteins with flexible regions that can undergo functional alteration of their side residues or backbone and thus implement the tinkering that leads to antifragility. This in-built property of the cell chassis must be taken into account when considering construction of cell factories driven by engineering principles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of proteins of different ages as cells multiply. At the onset of growth the cell is supposed to have all of its proteins of a given type of identical age (red circles). As time elapses some proteins begin to age (green, then blue and purple circles) and are replaced by young ones (red circles). At some point all cells display a mixture of the same protein carrying scars marking their different ages.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927596&req=5

f2-genes-02-00998: Distribution of proteins of different ages as cells multiply. At the onset of growth the cell is supposed to have all of its proteins of a given type of identical age (red circles). As time elapses some proteins begin to age (green, then blue and purple circles) and are replaced by young ones (red circles). At some point all cells display a mixture of the same protein carrying scars marking their different ages.

Mentions: Birth, growth, maturation and senescence are the four ages of all cells. This is true of their components as well. In general the maturation step is ignored: cell's components are viewed as synthesized, used in their final form, then decaying and being either repaired or destroyed. Maturation and possibly functional improvement during ageing is rarely taken into account. Senescence and ageing are treated as equivalent. Yet, quite a few physico-chemical processes suggests that the state of cell components at any time should be seen as actively browsing through a series of ageing states. In fact, notwithstanding apoptosis (which may be a process to reset the system), most cells harbor a mixture of aged and young components, reflecting the overall history of their divisions (Figure 2).


Antifragility and Tinkering in Biology (and in Business) Flexibility Provides an Efficient Epigenetic Way to Manage Risk.

Danchin A, Binder PM, Noria S - Genes (Basel) (2011)

Distribution of proteins of different ages as cells multiply. At the onset of growth the cell is supposed to have all of its proteins of a given type of identical age (red circles). As time elapses some proteins begin to age (green, then blue and purple circles) and are replaced by young ones (red circles). At some point all cells display a mixture of the same protein carrying scars marking their different ages.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927596&req=5

f2-genes-02-00998: Distribution of proteins of different ages as cells multiply. At the onset of growth the cell is supposed to have all of its proteins of a given type of identical age (red circles). As time elapses some proteins begin to age (green, then blue and purple circles) and are replaced by young ones (red circles). At some point all cells display a mixture of the same protein carrying scars marking their different ages.
Mentions: Birth, growth, maturation and senescence are the four ages of all cells. This is true of their components as well. In general the maturation step is ignored: cell's components are viewed as synthesized, used in their final form, then decaying and being either repaired or destroyed. Maturation and possibly functional improvement during ageing is rarely taken into account. Senescence and ageing are treated as equivalent. Yet, quite a few physico-chemical processes suggests that the state of cell components at any time should be seen as actively browsing through a series of ageing states. In fact, notwithstanding apoptosis (which may be a process to reset the system), most cells harbor a mixture of aged and young components, reflecting the overall history of their divisions (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: In this ubiquitous process, an original entity, challenged by an ever-changing environment, creates variants that evolve into novel entities.One such example is proteins with flexible regions that can undergo functional alteration of their side residues or backbone and thus implement the tinkering that leads to antifragility.This in-built property of the cell chassis must be taken into account when considering construction of cell factories driven by engineering principles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: AMAbiotics SAS, CEA/Genoscope, 2 rue Gaston Crémieux, 91057 Evry Cedex, France. a.danchin@amabiotics.com.

ABSTRACT
The notion of antifragility, an attribute of systems that makes them thrive under variable conditions, has recently been proposed by Nassim Taleb in a business context. This idea requires the ability of such systems to 'tinker', i.e., to creatively respond to changes in their environment. A fairly obvious example of this is natural selection-driven evolution. In this ubiquitous process, an original entity, challenged by an ever-changing environment, creates variants that evolve into novel entities. Analyzing functions that are essential during stationary-state life yield examples of entities that may be antifragile. One such example is proteins with flexible regions that can undergo functional alteration of their side residues or backbone and thus implement the tinkering that leads to antifragility. This in-built property of the cell chassis must be taken into account when considering construction of cell factories driven by engineering principles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus