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Antifragility and Tinkering in Biology (and in Business) Flexibility Provides an Efficient Epigenetic Way to Manage Risk.

Danchin A, Binder PM, Noria S - Genes (Basel) (2011)

Bottom Line: In this ubiquitous process, an original entity, challenged by an ever-changing environment, creates variants that evolve into novel entities.One such example is proteins with flexible regions that can undergo functional alteration of their side residues or backbone and thus implement the tinkering that leads to antifragility.This in-built property of the cell chassis must be taken into account when considering construction of cell factories driven by engineering principles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: AMAbiotics SAS, CEA/Genoscope, 2 rue Gaston Crémieux, 91057 Evry Cedex, France. a.danchin@amabiotics.com.

ABSTRACT
The notion of antifragility, an attribute of systems that makes them thrive under variable conditions, has recently been proposed by Nassim Taleb in a business context. This idea requires the ability of such systems to 'tinker', i.e., to creatively respond to changes in their environment. A fairly obvious example of this is natural selection-driven evolution. In this ubiquitous process, an original entity, challenged by an ever-changing environment, creates variants that evolve into novel entities. Analyzing functions that are essential during stationary-state life yield examples of entities that may be antifragile. One such example is proteins with flexible regions that can undergo functional alteration of their side residues or backbone and thus implement the tinkering that leads to antifragility. This in-built property of the cell chassis must be taken into account when considering construction of cell factories driven by engineering principles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparative histogram of the length of the proteins of E. coli (in blue) and that of the functions required under stationary conditions (in red, ordinate scale multiplied by ten).
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f1-genes-02-00998: Comparative histogram of the length of the proteins of E. coli (in blue) and that of the functions required under stationary conditions (in red, ordinate scale multiplied by ten).

Mentions: The distribution of the length of the proteins important for stationary survival is compared in Figure 1 to that of all proteins in the E. coli proteome: it displays a remarkable bias both for short and long proteins.


Antifragility and Tinkering in Biology (and in Business) Flexibility Provides an Efficient Epigenetic Way to Manage Risk.

Danchin A, Binder PM, Noria S - Genes (Basel) (2011)

Comparative histogram of the length of the proteins of E. coli (in blue) and that of the functions required under stationary conditions (in red, ordinate scale multiplied by ten).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927596&req=5

f1-genes-02-00998: Comparative histogram of the length of the proteins of E. coli (in blue) and that of the functions required under stationary conditions (in red, ordinate scale multiplied by ten).
Mentions: The distribution of the length of the proteins important for stationary survival is compared in Figure 1 to that of all proteins in the E. coli proteome: it displays a remarkable bias both for short and long proteins.

Bottom Line: In this ubiquitous process, an original entity, challenged by an ever-changing environment, creates variants that evolve into novel entities.One such example is proteins with flexible regions that can undergo functional alteration of their side residues or backbone and thus implement the tinkering that leads to antifragility.This in-built property of the cell chassis must be taken into account when considering construction of cell factories driven by engineering principles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: AMAbiotics SAS, CEA/Genoscope, 2 rue Gaston Crémieux, 91057 Evry Cedex, France. a.danchin@amabiotics.com.

ABSTRACT
The notion of antifragility, an attribute of systems that makes them thrive under variable conditions, has recently been proposed by Nassim Taleb in a business context. This idea requires the ability of such systems to 'tinker', i.e., to creatively respond to changes in their environment. A fairly obvious example of this is natural selection-driven evolution. In this ubiquitous process, an original entity, challenged by an ever-changing environment, creates variants that evolve into novel entities. Analyzing functions that are essential during stationary-state life yield examples of entities that may be antifragile. One such example is proteins with flexible regions that can undergo functional alteration of their side residues or backbone and thus implement the tinkering that leads to antifragility. This in-built property of the cell chassis must be taken into account when considering construction of cell factories driven by engineering principles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus